Agenda: Closing Day of Forum


Back to Agenda Next > < Previous
calendar icon

Thursday, November 18 — Closing Day of Forum

12:00 Noon – 12:15 p.m.

Opening Remarks

More information coming soon.

12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Grantee Spotlight Sessions

Advocates for Human Potential (AHP)

More information coming soon.

National Criminal Justice Training Center (NCJTC) of Fox Valley Technical College

More information coming soon.

Institute for Intergovernmental Research (IIR)

More information coming soon.

12:15 p.m. – 1:15 p.m.
Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Meeting

Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Administrator Open Forum

The Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) Administrator Open Forum offers participants a platform to discuss PDMP-related issues as well as learn current practices employed by their PDMP colleagues.  Moderated by PDMP Training and Technical Assistance Center staff, this session provides an environment for the exchange of opinions and innovative ideas for the PDMP community.

Objectives:

By the end of this session, participants should be able to:

  • Understand challenges facing PDMPs.
  • Develop strategies to address those challenges.
  • Learn from the experiences of their PDMP colleagues.

1:15 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
Networking Break

1:30 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
Grantee Q&A

Advocates for Human Potential (AHP)

More information coming soon.

National Criminal Justice Training Center (NCJTC) of Fox Valley Technical College

More information coming soon.

Institute for Intergovernmental Research (IIR)

More information coming soon.

2:00 p.m. – 2:15 p.m.
Networking Break

2:15p.m. – 3:30 p.m.
Breakout Session Five

Moving From Understanding the Effects of Trauma on the Lives of Those We Serve to Implementing Principles of Trauma-Informed Care

The National Association of State Mental Health Program Directors’ Center for Innovation in Health Policy and Practice promotes trauma-responsive approaches in the delivery of services to people who have experienced violence and trauma and are seeking support for recovery and healing.  For many, traumatic experiences have strained social connections in the family, in the workplace, in childrearing, and/or in housing, which may have led to consequent substance use, criminal behaviors, or other health and social problems—all of which need to be addressed in a trauma-integrated approach.  Widespread interest and attention to trauma has substantially raised awareness and understanding of trauma’s long-lasting impact, yet systems often struggle with the culture change needed to implement approaches that prevent retraumatization and promote safety.

SAMHSA’s Concept of Trauma and Guidance for a Trauma-Informed Approach describes the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s (SAMHSA) values-based principles and domains that serve, not as prescriptive measures, but rather as guidelines to implementing an approach aimed at doing no harm.  Presenters will discuss the definition and prevalence of trauma, the neurobiology of trauma and how it affects the developing brain, and how trauma-responsiveness can help people heal.  A person with lived experience with incarceration and substance use will be featured.  Practical examples of innovative, low-cost strategies, as well as resources and technical assistance opportunities, will be shared with participants.

Objectives:

At the conclusion of this training, participants will be able to:

  • Define trauma and discuss its prevalence.
  • Discuss strategies to reduce the likelihood of retraumatization.
  • Develop action steps to implement trauma-informed practices in their work.

Peer Recovery Support Services in Practice: Tailoring Peer Support to Unique Practice Settings

Peer recovery support services (PRSS) are increasingly offered across diverse criminal justice settings to address opioid, stimulant, and other substance use.  As the varied roles that peers play continue to achieve positive outcomes, unique practice settings are establishing creative solutions for implementing PRSS into their programs.  This session will:

  • Explore Tucson, Arizona, Police Department’s lessons learned in regard to tailoring PRSS to a law enforcement setting.
  • Identify challenges and opportunities associated with maintaining outside partnerships with community stakeholders.
  • Highlight tips for establishing internal, external, and peer buy-in.
  • Discuss issues surrounding peer supervision and overcoming disparities around dual role expectations.
  • Describe hiring practices for peers, as well as training practices for peers and other internal s

Implementation and Support of Harm Reduction Programs

This session will provide a foundational introduction to the principles of harm reduction, including the key areas for which a harm reduction approach can mitigate drug-related harm and promote wellness and health for people who use drugs.  Emphasis will be placed on state-level policy and the development and implementation of programming around issues central to harm reduction, including stigmatization, naloxone, Good Samaritan laws, syringe access, and drug checking.  The session will include evidence-based strategies that can be implemented at the state, local, and community levels to address rising rates of drug-related overdoses and how grantees can connect with existing networks to facilitate establishing, increasing capacity of, and scaling programs to support the health and dignity of people who use drugs.

Objectives:

By the end of this session, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the purpose and principles of harm reduction and how they relate to state, local, and community programming.
  • Discuss harm reduction strategies that states, organizations, and communities are engaged in to combat increasing rates of drug overdoses.
  • Understand how and where to get more information needed to implement harm reduction programming at the state, local, or community level.

National Institute of Justice’s Drugs and Crime Research and Forensic Technology Assistance

The National Institute of Justice’s (NIJ) Drugs and Crime Research Portfolio supports rigorous applied research on evidence-based tools, protocols, and policies for state, tribal, and local law enforcement and other criminal justice agencies that address drug trafficking, drug markets, and drug-related violence.  The panel begins with RTI’s presentation on NIJ’s Forensic Technology Center of Excellence (FTCOE) activities, developed with Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Program (COSSAP) support, that enhance collaborations among forensic science organizations and the broader public safety and public health communities through virtual learning, podcasts, landscape reports, and other technology assistance.  The panel also highlights two research projects funded under the NIJ Research and Evaluation on Drugs and Crime solicitation, which focuses on narcotics-related criminal investigation, prosecution, intelligence, and community surveillance relevant to law enforcement and medicolegal death investigation activities.  Researchers at the University of Delaware examined the impact of the Delaware Opioid Metric Intelligence Project and the challenges of mapping apps used by criminal justice and public health professionals.  In partnership with the Pennsylvania State Police, Penn State University researchers examined the structure of local opioid distribution networks and markets and the capacity for local intelligence to disrupt those operations using data-driven approaches to criminal justice policy and practice.

3:30 p.m. – 3:45 p.m.
Networking Break

3:45 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Breakout Session Six

Navigating Confidentiality in First Responder Deflection

First responders and behavioral health providers increasingly work together to provide services to individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs) and mental health conditions.  Questions frequently arise about how health privacy laws—including the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and 42 Code of Federal Regulations Part 2—permit or prevent sharing information.  How can first responders connect with behavioral health providers, including exchanging health information, in order to reduce barriers to treatment?  This workshop will address common “HIPAA myths” and describe ways to strengthen linkages between first responders and community providers while protecting patient rights and confidentiality.

Objectives:

By the end of this session, participants should be able to:

  • Describe the federal health privacy laws for individuals with SUD and those seeking mental health treatment.
  • Explore key privacy concepts for first responders working with individuals with SUDs and mental health needs in practical case studies.
  • Identify additional privacy resources for first responders through the Center of Excellence for Protected Health Information.

Reducing the Stigma of Addiction in Tribal Communities

The stigma of addiction can discourage individuals from accessing needed treatment and healthcare services.  It also negatively impacts the public’s perception of evidence-based intervention and treatment strategies.  This session will explore the brain science behind addiction, common misconceptions about addiction, and strategies to assist tribal communities and service providers in reducing the stigma of addiction within their communities.  The White Earth Nation and Shoshone-Bannock Tribes will share effective strategies they have implemented in their communities to raise community awareness and break down barriers related to the stigma of addiction.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this session, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the impact of addiction on the brain.
  • Identify the common misconceptions about addiction.
  • Summarize strategies and program examples to reduce the stigma of addiction in tribal communities.

Applying Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program Data to Community Overdose Responses

This session will focus on how two districts have utilized Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP) data to respond to overdoses in their communities.   Connecticut’s city and regional task forces have used ODMAP data to prioritize zip codes selected for information and prevention campaigns. 

The session will also include an overview of the design and implementation of a drug overdose surveillance system by public health professionals in the Nashville/Middle Tennessee region.  This surveillance system integrates multiple data streams and applications, including ODMAP, to monitor, detect, and respond to acute drug overdose activity, identify emerging trends, and support data-driven decisions and interventions in the community.

Objectives:

By the end of this session, participants should have an increased awareness of:

  • How ODMAP is utilized for overdose response efforts in two geographic areas (Northeast and mid-South).
  • Methodology associated with developing an overdose surveillance system including possible data streams and acute overdose activity detection channels.
  • How an overdose surveillance system can be leveraged in order to implement data-to-action strategies with public health, public safety, and prevention partners.
  • How an overdose surveillance system can be utilized as a core component of acute overdose response planning.

Treating Incarcerated Individuals With Methamphetamine and Stimulant Use Disorder – RSAT Presentation

More information coming soon.
Diamond shaped graphic accent