Grantee Projects

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Alaska Department of Public Safety

Alaska

The State of Alaska Tribal Diversion Project will support multiagency efforts in planning and implementing partnerships with tribes to establish effective law enforcement diversion programs for offenders, including those who abuse illicit or prescription opioids. This funding will support project implementation, enhancement, and management and address the opioid and drug epidemic in tribal communities. The deliverables will include implemented diversion agreements, along with subgrants to Alaska Tribes to directly support their efforts. Funding will also be used to support planning and collaboration among the Department of Law, the Department of Public Safety, the Department of Health and Social Services Division of Juvenile Justice, and Alaska Tribes.

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Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

Alaska

The Tlingit and Haida Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Prevention and Intervention Project will plan, develop, and implement a civil diversion program though the Tlingit and Haida Court that targets Native families in southeast Alaska impacted by opioid abuse. The project will utilize a stakeholder consultation model for completing assessment, capacity building, and strategic planning necessary to implement and sustain a comprehensive, culturally competent diversion program and system.

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Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration

Arkansas

The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration will: • Support an overdose crime scene team consisting of a criminal investigator and a peer recovery specialist to assist law enforcement task forces/agencies in a minimum of six geographically diverse sites (counties, regions, or localities) within the state. • Increase access and enrollment to treatment, increase education and awareness, and evaluate the grant strategies identified in 25 localities within the state to address offenders who may be opioid abusers. The sites to receive subawards will be selected through a competitive process. Subawardees will be required to use overdoes detection mapping application program. An independent evaluator will be selected after the grant is awarded.

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Arizona Criminal Justice Commission

Arizona

The Arizona Criminal Justice Commission (ACJC) will use grant funds to hire a criminal justice treatment coordinator and bring together representatives from partner agencies and community service agencies to create and implement the Arizona Criminal Justice and Treatment Improvement Project. Since the grant provided to ACJC was a statewide planning grant, the focus of this project period will be developing and submitting an implementation grant to the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) in 2019 that promotes strategies to identify and provide treatment recovery support services to high-frequency utilizers of multiple systems who have a history of opioid misuse and expanding diversion and alternatives to incarceration programs. Partner agencies include the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System, the Arizona High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA), the Arizona Department of Health Services, the State Department of Corrections, the Department of Public Safety, the Attorney General’s Office, the Administrative Office of the Courts, county attorneys, county sheriffs, chiefs of police, and county and city administration. The Arizona COAP Project team submitted its implementation grant to BJA in June 2019 under category 2-C, requesting funds to implement new programs in six sites across Arizona and to enhance and evaluate existing programs.

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Hoopa Valley Tribe

California

The Hoopa Valley Tribe will deliver customized interventions through the criminal justice system of Humboldt County and the Hoopa Valley Tribal Court. Among this project's deliverables are a full community needs assessment, an opioid diversion work plan, the implementation of data tracking systems across multiple domains, and broadened awareness of best practices for both county and tribal partners. The proposed project will be one of the first cross-jurisdictional diversion programs in Indian Country specifically designed to meet the opioid epidemic.

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Yurok Tribe of the Yurok Reservation

California

The Yurok Tribal Court’s long-term goal is to develop, implement, and enhance diversion programs to address the escalating opioid epidemic within the Yurok community. The Yurok Tribe will be implementing the Yurok Opioid Diversion to Healing (YODH) Program. YODH will complete a Yurok Tribal Action Plan and community assessment, implement a community education and outreach program and workplace opioid awareness program, develop and implement a screening process in collaboration with the Humboldt and Del Norte Sheriffs’ Offices and the Superior Courts, and establish a formalized diversion process.

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Boulder County

Colorado

Boulder County Community Justice Services will work with the project partners to develop diversion and policy-related programming across intercept points as alternatives to traditional prosecution for offenders with low criminogenic risk who are facing opioid-related charges, those with treatment needs who are residing in jail, or those reentering the community, with a focus across all interventions on those who are high system utilizers. The OMNI Institute will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Executive Office of the Governor of Delaware – Criminal Justice Council

Delaware

The Delaware Criminal Justice Council, in partnership with the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, will implement the Delaware Smart Criminal Justice and Treatment Change Team to effectively integrate initiatives, processes, and programs into standard treatment policies and practices maximizing efforts. Grant funds will implement programs to effectively integrate initiatives, processes, and programs into standard treatment policies and practices maximizing efforts. Grant funds will be used to implement comprehensive policies and practices identified in the planning phase and outlined in the coordinated state criminal justice and treatment plan. Subgrants will be awarded that assist and provide financial support to units of local government and community services agencies to implement strategies that support treatment and recovery service engagement; increase the use of diversion and alternatives to incarceration; and reduce the incidence of overdose death. The geographic area is the entire state of Delaware.

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Florida Office of the State Courts Administrator

Florida

The Florida Office of the State Courts Administrator proposes that five established family dependency drug courts increase the number of families they serve and it proposes to institute/enhance peer-support programs; incorporate medication-assisted treatment; establish substance use disorder prevention programs for the children whose parents are participants in family dependency drug court; execute evidence-based, parent-child relationship-strengthening programs; strengthen peer-to-peer collaboration among sites with an annual all-sites meeting and cross-site visits; and increase training and technical assistance regarding substance use disorder and opioid use disorder. This project serves family dependency drug courts in Broward, Palm Beach, Orange, Marion, and Citrus counties. Dr. Barbara Andraka-Christou and her team from the University of Central Florida will serve as the evaluator for this project.

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Iowa Governor's Office of Drug Control Policy

Iowa

The Iowa Governor’s Office of Drug Control Policy will: • Reduce substance abuse and criminal involvement involving nonviolent individuals by implementing or expanding pre-/post-arrest diversion to treatment in Black Hawk, Story, and Jones Counties. • Expand citizen access to medication disposal in 25 new sites in underserved areas of the state. The Criminal and Juvenile Justice Planning Agency, Iowa’s Statistical Analysis Center, will serve as the evaluator for the project.

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Boone County

Illinois

The Boone County Health Department will use grant funds to integrate behavioral health services into the jail’s detainee health services, including introducing medication-assisted treatment and initiate a Recovery Navigator program to provide comprehensive case management to detainees and opioid-abusing individuals coming into contact with law enforcement and first responders. The grant funds will support a full-time navigator and project coordinator. The Boone County Task Force will provide direct support to include developing a screening and referral process, identify and implement evidence-based services; develop sustainability and implementation plans, and an evaluation plan to track impacts and outcomes.

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Cook County Health and Hospitals System

Illinois

Cook County Health and Hospital System (CCHHS) and the Office of the Chief Judge (OCJ) are expanding their efforts to reduce the prevalence of opioid addiction in the Adult Probation Department (APD) in Cook County through Category 3. The goal of the proposed project, Universal Opioid Screening in Adult Probation to Reduce Usage and Overdose, is to engage activities around opioid addiction and facilitate training for probation officers and staff members; interagency partnerships for screening, assessment, and coordination of care of opioid use by probationers; and program evaluation.

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Indiana Family and Social Services Administration

Indiana

The Indiana Division of Mental Health and Addiction, in partnership with the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute (ICJI), Choices Coordinated Care Solutions (Choices), Centerstone, Relias Analytics, and the Indiana University Center for Collaborative Systems Change, seeks to address the treatment needs of justice-involved individuals of southern Indiana in seven rural counties. The project will use mobile technology hardware, software, internet connectivity, and Web-based services, along with other available resources, to assess participants in drug courts as well as individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) to gain access to services and provide treatment when necessary as a diversion from charges.

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LaPorte Circuit Court

Indiana

The Circuit Court of LaPorte, Indiana, will develop a family recovery court (FRC) to provide a holistic approach to families of children in need of services (CHINS) with co-occurring substance abuse problems. CHINS cases are filed by the state against parents who are neglecting or abusing their children. Project partners include Choices! Counseling Services, Swanson Center, Department of Child Services, and the Public Defender’s offices. Dr. Roy Fowles from Purdue University Northwest will serve as the researcher.

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City of New Orleans Health Department

Louisiana

The City of New Orleans Health Department proposes to use funds to continue a 2017 COAP-funded post-overdose response, Opioid Survival Connection, and conduct community outreach and education. Outreach and education activities include bystander response training and naloxone distribution to EMS and community members. Grant funds will be used to hire two project coordinators and purchase naloxone, training supplies, and a vehicle. Overdose detection mapping application program will also be implemented. Project partners include University Medical Center Emergency Department, New Orleans EMS, New Orleans Public Library, New Orleans Opioid Task Force, US Drug Enforcement Agency Field Office, Mayor’s Office of Community Engagement, Xavier University College of Pharmacy, and community providers.

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Louisiana Department of Health

Louisiana

The Louisiana Department of Health, Office of Behavioral Health will support access to, and engagement in, treatment and recovery support services for offenders with opioid abuse in Orleans and East Baton Rouge Parishes jails, as well as increased use of diversion in Orleans, Jefferson, and St. Tammany Parishes. This will be accomplished by providing support for peer support specialists and treatment staff members at the Day Reporting Center in New Orleans, which serves both Orleans and Jefferson Parishes, and at the St. Tammany Parish Jail to enable those with opioid use disorders to be assessed and referred to a specialty court.

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Louisiana Department of Health

Louisiana

The Louisiana Department of Health’s (LDH) Office of Behavioral Health plans to implement the Louisiana Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Program (LaCOAP), a program that aims to reduce the number of opioid-related overdoses and overdose deaths among offenders. The program will develop a multiagency planning team to develop a plan to address opioid use disorders in offenders. This multidisciplinary approach includes a large number of community partners, including the Louisiana Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Criminal Justice, LDH’s Office of Public Health/Bureau of Health Informatics, the Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections, and the New Orleans Division of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Other partners include the New Orleans Sheriff’s Department and the local governing entities that provide behavioral health services in three of the targeted parishes, to include Metropolitan Human Services District, Capital Area Human Services District, and the Florida Parishes Human Services Authority.

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City of Brockton

Massachusetts

The city of Brockton will develop a collaborative case management system involving healthcare experts, treatment specialists, police outreach officers, and recovery coaches. The case management team will work intensively to engage the highest risk populations and provide them with resources that will best meet their needs with the goal of sustained engagement in treatment. The project includes partnerships among the city of Brockton, the Champion Plan, Gandara Center, and Brockton Area Multi-Services, Inc. Community Outreach, Prevention, and Education (C.O.P.E.) Center. This project will engage Kelly Research Associates as its research partner.

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City of Holyoke

Massachusetts

The Holyoke Police Department will use funds primarily for salaries that support a project coordinator, a narcotics intervention officer, a recovery coach, and a mental health supervisor. Through the Project Recovery and Engagement of Addicts and Chronic users of Heroin (REACH) Project, the Holyoke Police Department will address the significant opiate drug problem in Holyoke, Massachusetts. Project goals are to decrease the number of overdose victims, decrease the number of narcotics crimes, and increase the support systems for people addicted to opioids in Holyoke.

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East Bridgewater Police Department

Massachusetts

Plymouth County Outreach (PCO), a police and treatment outreach approach to high-risk individuals, will continue to develop its countywide, multifaceted approach involving law enforcement, hospital, recovery, and local treatment partnerships that conduct post-overdose home follow-up visits to overdose survivors who are not initially admitted to a hospital or treatment services. The local research partner, Kelley Research Associates, created a unique, real-time overdose tracking system that supports the daily overdose response program. The East Bridgewater Police Department will make data available through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Middle District Attorney's Office

Massachusetts

COAP supports the Middle District Attorney’s Office in implementing the Worcester County Drug Diversion Initiative. Clinicians from AdCare Hospital assist law enforcement and prosecutors in identifying and screening individuals who may be appropriate for diversion to substance abuse treatment programs. This program is currently operating out of two locations – Leominster and Gardner/Winchendon District Courts— and it will soon be integrated into five district courts throughout Worcester County. Fitchburg State University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention

Maryland

Maryland’s “Regrounding Our Response: A Coordinated Public Safety and Public Health Approach to the Opioid Epidemic” initiative will establish six new law enforcement assisted diverson (LEAD) sites (St. Mary’s County, Columbia in Howard County, Westminster in Carroll County, Annapolis City in Anne Arundel County, Hagerstown in Washington County, and Cumberland in Allegany County), support three existing LEAD sites (Belair in Harford County, Wicomico County, and Baltimore City), and support detention-based interventions in partnership with the Office of the Public Defender in five of the nine sites. The objectives include: (1) reduce recidivism in LEAD participants; (2) reduce calls for service for drug-related activity in the target areas; (3) reduce criminal justice costs incurred by LEAD participants; and (4) improve police understanding of and response to issues related to addiction and mental health disorders. The Maryland Statistical Analysis Center will support the research, performance management, and evaluation of all the selected sites.

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City of Detroit

Michigan

The Detroit Police Department’s Opioid Abuse Diversion Program will create and implement a law enforcement-led pre- and post-arrest diversion in Detroit using the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) model. The School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project. The applicant agreed to provide data through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Clare County

Michigan

The Clare County, Michigan, Prosecuting Attorney’s Office will establish a task force to focus on drug-related problems, to include the opioid epidemic. Representatives from all five of the law enforcement agencies that service Clare County, medical personnel, substance abuse counselors, pharmacists, a representative from probation and parole, and any other professionals who are identified during the implementation will comprise the task force. Federal agencies will also be invited to participate in the task force to participate in investigations that might be more effectively prosecuted at the federal level. The assistant prosecutor in charge of the program will coordinate with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District.

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Minnesota Department of Public Safety—Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

Minnesota

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS) will support the “Timely Treatment, Strengthened Service, and Effective Evaluation for Overdose Prevention: Linkage to Care Across Minnesota” project to achieve the following objectives in eight sites: • Reduce opioid misuse and opioid overdose death by supporting local efforts to implement effective opioid overdose prevention projects. • Support local efforts to implement treatment and recovery support linkage activities serving individuals vulnerable for drug overdose. • Support implementation of local multidisciplinary intervention models to bring together stakeholders with different perspectives and different information to identify drug overdose prevention strategies. • Enhance access to naloxone among people who use drugs to decrease overdose deaths. • Enhance successful local multidisciplinary overdose prevention activities to decrease overdose deaths. • Evaluate the extent to which additional funding to eight opioid overdose prevention projects, referred to as “Tackling Opioid Use With Networks (TOWN)”, impact the incidence of overdose in communities. • Create a TOWN Manual in collaboration with the communities to support the expansion and sustainability of the TOWN model. The eight sites will implement three evidence-based activities: (1) peer recovery specialists in emergency departments; (2) treatment linkage by emergency medical services; and (3) overdose fatality review teams. The project will also enhance six Minnesota Department of Public Safety-funded syringe services programs by providing each site with naloxone to distribute to participants who use opioids. Dr. Catherine Diamond from the Minnesota Department of Health will lead the project evaluation.

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City of St. Louis Circuit Attorney's Office

Missouri

The City of St. Louis Circuit Attorney’s Office (CAO) is requesting funding for St. Louis Circuit Attorney Navigation, Diversion, and Opportunity program: a post-arrest diversion program offered on a pre-booking, pre-charge, or pre-plea basis to individuals with low-level drug possession charges—providing them with education, access to treatment and wrap-around case management services as an alternative to incarceration. The program will serve individuals who have committed opioid-related offenses in the City of St. Louis, Missouri, program eligibility will be determined by the location of the offense, not the residency of the participant. Participants will receive treatment, healthcare, housing, and employment services through referral partnerships with Affinia Healthcare, Queen of Peace Center, CareSTL Health, The Missouri Network for Opiate Reform and Recovery, MO Better Living, and the St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment. Additionally, the CAO will work with the St. Louis Director of Public Safety to facilitate the creation of a citation referral system with the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department. Funding will support a full-time project manager, three full-time case managers, half-time administrative staff, emergency financial assistance, and metro tickets to participants. The University of Missouri St. Louis – Missouri Institute of Mental Health (UMSL-MIMH) will serve as the evaluation partner.

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Buncombe County Health and Human Services

North Carolina

Buncombe County Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) proposes to connect individuals at risk of overdose with substance use treatment and peer support; provide transitional or recovery housing for individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) leaving the jails or the emergency department; develop programs to address the opioid epidemic in rural areas; develop and implement a comprehensive plan to reduce the risk of overdose death and enhance treatment and recovery service engagement among the pretrial and post-trial populations leaving jails; and support the timely collection and integration of data to provide an understanding of drug trends, support program evaluation, inform clinical decision-making, identify at-risk individuals or populations, and support investigations. Buncombe County DHHS, the Sheriff’s Office, and Emergency Medical Services will implement the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

North Carolina

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ Integrated Opioid Abuse Program will develop a task force composed of tribal decision makers who will create policies and keep agencies accountable to indicators of success. A multidisciplinary team will provide direct services to high-frequency drug users and their families. These two teams will work together to develop a plan to create a secured mental health/opioid abuse treatment center and secure transportation for participants becoming certified peer recovery support specialists.

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Camden County

New Jersey

Camden County, New Jersey, plans to implement the Camden County Opioid Abuse Diversion Program (CCOAD) to improve treatment and support services for individuals with a history of opioid abuse diagnosis. These interventions will specifically target the pre-trial and reentry intercepts of the Sequential Intercept Model. The initial phase of CCOAD entailed conducting a comprehensive assessment of individuals incarcerated in the Camden County Correctional Facility (CCCF) to document the extent of the opioid crisis in the Camden County jail, subsequently setting up wraparound services at the pre-trial and reentry intercepts. The second phase of the program entails the integration of specialized care managers to work intensely with individuals with an opioid abuse diagnosis upon their release to help them navigate treatment options and resources as well as advocacy specific to housing, employment, legal challenges, and access to social services. In addition, CCOAD will include a comprehensive ongoing analysis on the effectiveness of strategies used by the program. The Walter Rand Institute of Public Affairs at Rutgers University will serve as the project’s research partner.

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City of Newark

New Jersey

The Newark Police Division will use grant funds to support a pre-arraignment diversion program in partnership with the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office and Newark Community Solutions. Police officers will be trained to identify signs and symptoms of opioid abuse and dependency and will flag individuals arrested on eligible charges. The Essex County Prosecutor’s Office will determine eligibility and Newark Community Solutions will support participants. Newark Community Solutions will hire a full-time coordinator, full-time case manager, and part-time case manager. The Center for Court Innovation will provide analytic and training support and Rutgers University will serve as the research partner.

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State of New Jersey, Department of Law and Public Safety

New Jersey

The New Jersey Department of Law and Public Safety (DLPS) will use grant funds to create a coordinated plan, formulated with pertinent stakeholders, to assess how best to leverage available data, resources, and funding streams to establish opioid response teams in the five most at-risk and in-need municipalities in New Jersey to add another point of entry to treatment for opioid-addicted individuals. The New Jersey DLPS will offer subawards to help fund opioid response teams at the local level. DLPS’s goal for the program is to provide crisis intervention for opioid-addicted individuals at multiple entry points, thus facilitating another link to treatment and recovery programs through law enforcement.

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Bernalillo County

New Mexico

Bernalillo County in New Mexico will use grant funds to expand access to treatment and recovery support services across behavioral health, primary care, criminal justice, and emergency management services. Grant funds will be used to hire a full-time coordinator and two case managers. The county and partners will engage in comprehensive planning; create a mobile harm reduction center staffed by a nurse and the two case managers; increase medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for off reservation urban Indians; provide transitional housing for underserved youth and their families; and provide MAT to incarcerated youth. The University of New Mexico Institute for Social Research will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Dona Ana County

New Mexico

The Dona Ana County Health and Human Services Department will implement a law enforcement assisted diversion program and other activities aimed at reducing opioid use and mitigating the impact on individuals and communities. The project includes a coordinator and case manager as well as services from the National Alliance on Mental Illnesses for peer support and the Las Cruces Police Department for officer training and implementation costs. Naloxone will also be purchased, funds will be used for transitional housing, and trauma-informed training. New Mexico State University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Pueblo of Pojoaque

New Mexico

The Pueblo of Pojoaque will create the Pueblo of Pojoaque Opioid Prevention and Intervention Project, a court-based, pre-prosecution diversion program. A project coordinator and an outreach worker/case manager will be hired. The State of New Mexico Sentencing Commission will serve as the evaluation partner for the proposed project.

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New York State Unified Court System

New York

The New York State Unified Court System will partner with the Center for Court Innovation (CCI) and the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services to implement the New York State Opioid Reduction Teleservices Program. Up to three opioid courts will be selected—based on demonstrated need and rural location—to receive technology-based access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) providers. The court system and CCI researchers will develop materials to educate the field about using remote technology to improve treatment, judicial monitoring, and MAT induction.

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Office of the Bronx County District Attorney

New York

The Bronx District Attorney, in partnership with the Bronx Criminal Court and the Center for Court Innovation/Bronx Community Solutions, will address the crisis in opioid deaths and overdose by enhancing the Overdose Avoidance Recovery (OAR) Program. This enhanced OAR Program will be expanded into two additional courtrooms. BetaGov/Litmus at NYU will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, Inc. at OASAS

New York

The Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, Inc. at The New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse (OASAS) proposes the New York Opioid Court Treatment Enhancement Project to enhance and evaluate substance abuse treatment and recovery support service systems treating offenders participating in ten opioid courts in Troy, Elmira, Watertown, Canandaigua, Niagara Falls, Montgomery, Rockland, Nassau, Queens, and Staten Island. OASAS is working in collaboration with the New York State Unified Court System (UCS) to expand treatment and recovery support services to serve offenders in opioid courts the moment they enter the criminal justice system. UCS is initiating opioid court models based on the original model established by the Buffalo Opioid Intervention Court in 2017. The project will engage the Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion at Syracuse University as the research partner for this project.

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Seneca Nation of Indians

New York

The Seneca Nation of Indians Peacemakers Court will address the increasing number of opioid overdoses and overdose-related deaths in the Seneca National Territories by reducing reliance on emergency health care and the criminal justice system by high-frequency opioid users. In partnership with Seneca Strong, a community-based drug and alcohol prevention and recovery program, the Peacemakers Court will create a community-driven, culturally competent diversion project that will specifically target Native American opioid utilizers who have a high number of contacts with multiple systems. The project coordinator will assemble a multidisciplinary team responsible for developing the program’s policy and procedures. Programming will include culturally specific professionals and confidential trainings and individualized wraparound services, in addition to a data analysis.

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Adams County

Ohio

The Adams County Health Department will embed a community care coordinator within the Sheriff's Office, Probation Department and County Court to provide a real-time interface between community recovery resources and the criminal justice system; expand capacity of the quick response team; expand drug treatment opportunities to incarcerated individuals, including MAT; establish peer recovery support for individuals returning to the community before release; establish a Handle with Care program; and establish an overdose fatality review committee.

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Butler County Mental Health and Addiction Recovery Services Board

Ohio

Butler County will expand the existing pilot Quick Response Team (QRT) to the more rural areas of the county, establish victim services by hiring a care coordinator, expand school-based groups for children of opiate abusers, and establish law enforcement and court-based diversion options for nonviolent opioid abusers. Miami University of Ohio will serve as the local research partner. The applicant agreed to provide data through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Franklin County

Ohio

Between 2003 and 2015, Franklin County experienced a 343 percent increase in residents dying from drug-related overdoses. To combat what the DEA has referred to as “Ground Zero” of the opiate and carfentanil crisis, the government of Franklin County, Ohio, will implement the Diversion Alternative–Project Opioid (DA–PO) program, a comprehensive and multifaceted approach to reducing the impact of the opioid crisis. Expanding treatment and support services and reducing the number of overdoses and fatalities are the project’s main goals. In addition, the DA–PO program calls for planning and implementation of a Community Mayor's Drug Court, the launch of a robust harm-reduction campaign that will include hosting town hall meetings, distributing naloxone kits to families of overdose survivors, and distributing fentanyl test strips to those in active addiction. Mighty Crow Media will partner with Franklin County as the project’s researcher.

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Guernsey County

Ohio

The Guernsey County Sheriff’s Office will increase support services for those impacted by addiction. The key component of the proposal is the implementation of a diversion program with an evidence-based curriculum at the Justice Center. Funds were also requested to purchase and install equipment to increase the safety and security of inmates in the county jail by improving the intake process at the jail.

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Hocking County

Ohio

The Hocking County Prosecutor’s Office, in collaboration with the Hocking County Sheriff’s Office, local treatment providers, and the Hocking County Health Department, has expanded an administrator role for the Hocking Overdose Partnership Endeavor (HOPE). HOPE is a coordinated, multi-disciplinary intervention and risk-reduction response team that is dedicated to connecting individuals who are at risk for overdose and/or survivors of a non-fatal overdose and their families with substance abuse and behavioral health treatment providers or peer recovery supports. HOPE consists of law enforcement, other first responders, treatment providers, child welfare providers, public health providers, and the prosecutor’s office. The applicant agreed to make data available through Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Marion County

Oregon

Marion County will expand its Law Enforcement-Assisted Diversion (LEAD) initiative in targeted neighborhoods in Salem, Oregon. The Oregon Criminal Justice Commission will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Multnomah County Health Department

Oregon

The Multnomah County Health Department will use grant funds to embed an opioid use disorder (OUD) corrections counselor and peer recovery mentors in booking for Multnomah County. The individuals in these positions will identify persons in need of OUD treatment and assist them in successfully engaging with recovery programs that offer medication-assisted therapy (MAT). A full-time coordinator will be employed to engage partners in a planning process to further identify gaps and refine project strategies, as well as ongoing coordination of opioid overdose strategies for populations with OUD. A focus of the grant activities is to screen and identify offenders for OUD and provide navigation services and peer recovery support to connect them to treatment, including MAT, and other critical resources. Dr. David Dowler of Program Design and Evaluation Services will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) will fund projects for counties that work with the Technical Assistance Center at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy’s Program Evaluation and Research Unit to implement evidence-based programs to reduce overdose deaths.

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Rhode Island State Police

Rhode Island

The Rhode Island State Police will implement the Heroin-Opioid Prevention Effort (HOPE) Initiative, the nation’s first statewide law enforcement-led opioid overdose outreach program, modeled after the Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI). The HOPE Initiative engages law enforcement personnel in a proactive outreach strategy to combat the opioid overdose epidemic by bringing together substance-use professionals and members of law enforcement with the mission of reaching out to those who are at risk of overdosing and encouraging them to be assessed and treated. The project will support the HOPE Initiative by enhancing the ongoing efforts of state and local government to address the opioid overdose epidemic, including gathering real-time law enforcement data on opioid overdoses to identify individuals with opioid use disorder. In addition, the project will support a program involving law enforcement and case management to provide outreach to individuals with opioid use disorder. Outreach efforts will include victims and child welfare services. Data gathered through the HOPE Initiative will be shared with the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP). Kelley Research Associates will serve as the project evaluator.

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Lancaster County

South Carolina

Lancaster County, South Carolina, will implement a pre-arrest diversion program based on the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) model. A research partner will be selected at the time of the award. The applicant agreed to make data available through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services

South Carolina

The South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services will assist in developing a medication-assisted treatment (MAT) project in York County, in partnership with the Sixteenth Judicial Circuit Solicitor’s Office, the York County Sheriff’s Office, and treatment partners. Winthrop University will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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Sevier County Government

Tennessee

Sevier County will enhance the Sevier County Offender Recovery Program (SCORP), a comprehensive, collaborative effort to identify and refer individuals to treatment and recovery following incarceration. Interventions begin during incarceration; however, the majority of services are provided immediately at release during the probationary period. Funds will be used to hire a peer mentor coordinator, a women’s service liaison, and a probation/life skills coach for incarcerated women enrolled in the program and expand the substance abuse prevention education program to include the families of SCORP participants.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse will: • Support six new implementation project sites (Davidson, Montgomery, Sumner, Putnam, Wilson, and Washington counties) as well as five enhancement project sites for counties that are currently COAP funded (Sullivan, Hamilton, Knox, Jefferson, and Coffee Counties). Sullivan and Hamilton Counties will (1) embed behavioral health clinicians with law enforcement; (2) provide employment readiness and connection to employment services both pre- and post-incarceration; and/or (3) deliver evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy courses. • Enhance six regional drug-endangered children response teams in Dickson, Cheatham, Lawrence, Franklin, Jefferson, and Scott Counties. Response teams will use a collaborative approach in meeting the needs of children affected by drug overdose events as well as their parents. The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation will also implement a statewide prevention strategy by creating a virtual reality game with education content for students to engage with at school events. • Integrate three certified peer recovery support specialist (CPRS) positions in probation and parole offices across the state, one in each of the three Grand Divisions of Tennessee. • Provide recovery support services, including recovery housing, as part of a comprehensive response. Dr. Carolyn Marie Audet and Lauren Allard will serve as the research partners for this project.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services will develop the Hamilton County Police and Community Overdose Response Team (PCORT) in Hamilton County. Grant funds will be used to support a coordinator and peer navigator(s), and a case manager will provide support services to both individuals who have overdosed and victims, as well as providing administrative grant support. The case manager will also coordinate with the Tennessee Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (TADEC) and the Hamilton County District Attorney’s Office through the Hamilton County Family Justice Center. The PCORT coordinator will be responsible for exporting and uploading all relevant data into the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP) data collection tool. An independent evaluator will serve as the project evaluator.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services will develop the Sullivan County Overdose Response Team (SCORT) in Sullivan County. Grant funds will be used to support a coordinator and peer navigator(s), and a case manager will provide support services to both individuals who have overdosed and victims as well as administrative grant support. The case manager will also coordinate with the Tennessee Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (TADEC) and the Sullivan County District Attorney’s Office through the Sullivan County Family Justice Center. The SCORT coordinator will be responsible for exporting and uploading all relevant data into the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP) data collection tool. An independent evaluator will serve as the project evaluator.

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Bexar County Commissioners Court

Texas

Bexar County Commissioners Court will create a strategic plan, develop a dashboard of all data related to opioid use and abuse, and fund evidence-based outpatient and residential treatment. The University of Texas at San Antonio will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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County of Page

Virginia

The Page County Sheriff’s Office proposes to develop the Page County Cognitive Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment Project that will provide cognitive behavioral treatment for individuals who are involved with the justice system as a result of their opioid use. The project includes a coordinator to manage the operations of a day reporting center where individuals can receive individual or group sessions in person or via teleconferencing. The project will fund equipment for the telehealth component and will serve the county of Page and the towns of Rileyville, Luray, Stanley, and Shenandoah. Project partners include Page County Sheriff’s Office, Page County Jail, Luray Police Department, Stanley Police Department, and the Shenandoah Police Department.

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Seattle King County Department of Public Health

Washington

Seattle and King County Public Health is proposing to provide enhanced care coordination services focusing on treatment decision-making within the correctional setting and the linkage and retention of formerly incarcerated individuals into community-based opioid use disorder treatment programs. Transition support services for individuals who receive Medicated Assisted Treatment will be provided as well as increased identification of individuals with OUD, enhanced release planning from jail, and linage to a community provider for up to five visits following release from jail. Grant funds requested will provide: a half-time coordinator, two full-time substance use disorder specialists, a health program assistant and a lead evaluator, Dr. Hood, Seattle King County Public Health.

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County of Juneau

Wisconsin

The Juneau County Sheriff’s Office proposes a jail-based substance use disorder program in collaboration with the Juneau County Department of Human Services. It will include a coordinator to provide expanded case management services to include screening and assessment; a full-time jail-based therapist to develop treatment plans and provide individual and group therapy, and referral to a community-based MAT program. The Sheriff’s Office intends to contract with a local program evaluator to conduct yearly evaluations to assess the overall implementation and the effectiveness of the program in achieving its stated goals and objectives.

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Milwaukee County Housing Division

Wisconsin

The Milwaukee Prostitution and Opioid Diversion Project (MPOD) within the Milwaukee County Housing Division will establish a public health and justice partnership to address the unique needs of women in street prostitution and sex trafficking who abuse illicit or prescription opioids (and other drugs) and frequently come into contact with the justice system for prostitution or drug-related arrests or as victims of sex trafficking. MPOD will enhance service capacity in the current Sisters Diversion Project, a municipal pre-arrest prostitution diversion program, building on the pre-existing partnership among the Milwaukee Police Department, the Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division, the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office, local treatment agencies, and the Medical College of Wisconsin; and enhance coordination and services for women in Milwaukee County’s Early Interventions Program (specifically, its pretrial diversion program). MPOD will engage the Medical College of Wisconsin as the research partner for this project.

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Waukesha County

Wisconsin

The Waukesha County Criminal Justice Collaborating Council will work with the District Attorney’s Office to develop a pre-charge diversion program for low-risk offenders who abuse illicit or prescription opioids and expand the use of deferred prosecution agreements for moderate-risk offenders who abuse illicit or prescription opioids. The University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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Winnebago County District Attorney

Wisconsin

The Winnebago County District Attorney will improve data infrastructure and develop diversion strategies for people with opioid use disorders using evidence-based components. BetaGov/Litmus at New York University (NYU) will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Wisconsin Department of Justice

Wisconsin

The Wisconsin Department of Justice (DOJ) will support the implementation of local law enforcement assisted diversion (LEAD) and medication-assisted treatment (MAT) programs in jails. Five pre-booking diversion sites using the LEAD model will be selected to provide diversion to treatment at the pre-arrest or post-arrest stages. Nine jail-based sites will be selected to provide non-narcotic, non-addictive injectable MAT to an inmate in the days immediately preceding re-entry to the community. The MAT program will include community-based care coordination for inmates exiting the county or tribal jail and rely on evidence-based, trauma-informed practices for substance use disorder treatment. This project will engage the Wisconsin DOJ's Bureau of Justice Information and Analysis as the research partner for this project.

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Logan County Commission

West Virginia

The Logan County Commission, in partnership with the Southwestern Regional Day Report Center in Logan, West Virginia, will implement the Fresh Start program, which will facilitate access to treatment services to overdose survivors. West Virginia has the highest drug overdose death rate in the nation. Overdoses attributed to prescription drug overdoses are especially prevalent in the southernmost counties of West Virginia, including Logan County. At the center of the program will be agricultural and artisan programming, which aims to reconnect clients with their communities. The program will offer community mentoring, interagency teamwork, life-based skills development sessions, craftsmanship, artisanship, and credit attainment through the local community college. Another key component of the program is the creation of the Logan County Health Department Satellite site, to provide increased access to basic health-care services. Marshall University will serve as the project’s research partner.

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West Virginia Division of Administrative Services, Justice and Community Services

West Virginia

The West Virginia Division of Justice and Community Services (DJCS) will address the opioid crisis in West Virginia by increasing the number of technology-assisted treatment services for individuals involved with the justice system because of an opioid use disorder in rural areas. The program plans to provide mental health services, addiction recovery services, and alternative sanctions or diversions. These services will be implemented through existing community corrections programs and future partnerships to provide risk and need assessments, group counseling, and individual counseling. The project will purchase and install the necessary hardware and software in 12 community corrections programs. The Office of Research and Strategic Planning, a unit within the DJCS, will provide for the research needs of the project.

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