Grantee Projects

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Alaska Department of Public Safety

Alaska

The State of Alaska Tribal Diversion Project will support multiagency efforts in planning and implementing partnerships with tribes to establish effective law enforcement diversion programs for offenders, including those who abuse illicit or prescription opioids. This funding will support project implementation, enhancement, and management and address the opioid and drug epidemic in tribal communities. The deliverables will include implemented diversion agreements, along with subgrants to Alaska Tribes to directly support their efforts. Funding will also be used to support planning and collaboration among the Department of Law, the Department of Public Safety, the Department of Health and Social Services Division of Juvenile Justice, and Alaska Tribes.

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Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

Alaska

The Tlingit and Haida Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Prevention and Intervention Project will plan, develop, and implement a civil diversion program though the Tlingit and Haida Court that targets Native families in southeast Alaska impacted by opioid abuse. The project will utilize a stakeholder consultation model for completing assessment, capacity building, and strategic planning necessary to implement and sustain a comprehensive, culturally competent diversion program and system.

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Jefferson County Commission

Alabama

Jefferson County Commission applied for Category 1a urban area funding in the amount of $1,189,215. The Jefferson County Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Program (COSSAP) will extend peer recovery services to include expanded pretrial supervision, as well as provide evidence-based treatment, including medication-assisted treatment (MAT), to individuals at high risk for overdose. This project serves a population of more than 500,000 in Jefferson County, Alabama. The project includes partnerships between the University of Alabama Department of Psychiatry — Substance Abuse Division, Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, and a local evaluator. Priority considerations addressed in this application include providing services to Qualified Opportunity Zones, addressing persistent poverty, and serving a region that has been disproportionately impacted by substance abuse.

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Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration

Arkansas

The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration is applying for a Category 2 statewide area grant in the amount of $6,000,000. The Arkansas COSSAP Project will address the opioid epidemic strategically and continue providing support to areas that have been disproportionally impacted by the abuse of illicit opioids, stimulants, and other substances, as indicated by a high rate of treatment admissions for substances other than alcohol; high rates of overdose-related deaths; and lack of accessibility to treatment and recovery services. The primary focuses of the proposed projects are comprehensive, real-time, regional information collection, analysis, and dissemination; the development of peer recovery services and treatment alternatives to incarceration; and continued Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-based Program (COAP) overdose investigations involving peer recovery services and the implementation of strategies identified in the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Strategic Plan. This project serves specific counties where high rates of opioid deaths have been identified in COAP Category 2; however, the specific subrecipients for the proposed projects have not been selected. The project includes partnerships between the Department of Finance and Administration Office of Intergovernmental Services (DFA-IGS), Department Human Services, Office of State Drug Director, and the Single State Authority, in addition to a new partnership between DFA-IGS and the Arkansas Coroners’ Association. Priority considerations addressed in this application include providing services to rural communities and the fact that the individuals (populations) intended to benefit from the project reside in high-poverty and/or persistent-poverty counties.

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Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration

Arkansas

The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration will: • Support an overdose crime scene team consisting of a criminal investigator and a peer recovery specialist to assist law enforcement task forces/agencies in a minimum of six geographically diverse sites (counties, regions, or localities) within the state. • Increase access and enrollment to treatment, increase education and awareness, and evaluate the grant strategies identified in 25 localities within the state to address offenders who may be opioid abusers. The sites to receive subawards will be selected through a competitive process. Subawardees will be required to use overdoes detection mapping application program. An independent evaluator will be selected after the grant is awarded.

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Alameda County Probation Department

California

The Alameda County Probation Department (ACPD) is applying for a Category 1a urban area grant in the amount of $1,195,323. Alameda County’s Residential Multi-Service Opportunity Center will expand access to responsive community alternatives to incarceration, as well as the county’s capacity to provide evidence-based mental health and substance use treatment services, built through a collaborative system of care that reduce the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances on individuals and communities, including a reduction in the number of overdose fatalities. This project serves Alameda County, a large, urban county with a population of 1.67 million. The project includes partnerships between ACPD and a qualified contracted service provider. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high-poverty area and a persistent poverty county, as well as enhanced public safety in federally designated Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Hoopa Valley Tribe

California

The Hoopa Valley Tribe will deliver customized interventions through the criminal justice system of Humboldt County and the Hoopa Valley Tribal Court. Among this project's deliverables are a full community needs assessment, an opioid diversion work plan, the implementation of data tracking systems across multiple domains, and broadened awareness of best practices for both county and tribal partners. The proposed project will be one of the first cross-jurisdictional diversion programs in Indian Country specifically designed to meet the opioid epidemic.

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Orange County Health Care Agency

California

The Orange County Health Care Agency applied for a Category 1a rural area grant in the amount of $1,200,000. The Orange County Health Care Agency’s Closing the Gaps by Expanding Access for Reentry Clients program will provide (1) a transfer for those leaving Orange County Central Jail to a peer support recovery specialist for transportation and immediate connection to a case coordinator at one of four MAT and substance use disorder (SUD) treatment county clinics, (2) MAT and SUD treatment services by psychiatrists at the four county clinics, and (3) training by addiction specialist(s) for mental health workers and physicians in the county clinics on SUD and best-practices for working with MAT clients. This project serves Orange County, California, with approximately 3.2 million residents. The project includes partnerships between Correctional Health Services (CHS) and is supported by the Orange County Sheriff’s Department. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high rates of overdose deaths and a need to increase accessibility to treatment providers in the City of Santa Ana with areas of 25 percent poverty.

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Yurok Tribe

California

Yurok Tribal Health and Human Services applied for a Category 1c tribal/rural area grant in the amount of $600,000. The Regional Expectations Accede to Coordination for Healing: Opioids Undercut by Treatment (REACH OUT) program will provide pre-court and court-connected culturally responsive programs that prioritize and expedite early assessment, treatment, recovery, and other supportive services to address communities impacted by opioids, stimulants, and other substances. The program will use the following strategies: (1) tribal healing to wellness approaches; (2) peer recovery; (3) team staffing and court hearings; (4) hot spot analysis (measuring increases in MAT and other drug treatment services); and (5) community education about culturally attuned services that meet the needs of the whole individual, family, and community. This project serves rural territories in Del Norte (1,139 tribal members and 27,828 total population), Humboldt (2,024 tribal members and 136,800 total population), and Trinity (45 tribal members) counties in northwestern California. The project includes partnerships between two tribal courts, two state courts, and their justice partners’ tribal and county law enforcement, attorneys, medical clinics, hospitals, and social services. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural, high-poverty communities facing real challenges, such as lack of public transportation, limited availability of alcohol and other drug treatment, and other support services.

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Yurok Tribe of the Yurok Reservation

California

The Yurok Tribal Court’s long-term goal is to develop, implement, and enhance diversion programs to address the escalating opioid epidemic within the Yurok community. The Yurok Tribe will be implementing the Yurok Opioid Diversion to Healing (YODH) Program. YODH will complete a Yurok Tribal Action Plan and community assessment, implement a community education and outreach program and workplace opioid awareness program, develop and implement a screening process in collaboration with the Humboldt and Del Norte Sheriffs’ Offices and the Superior Courts, and establish a formalized diversion process.

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Boulder County

Colorado

Boulder County Community Justice Services will work with the project partners to develop diversion and policy-related programming across intercept points as alternatives to traditional prosecution for offenders with low criminogenic risk who are facing opioid-related charges, those with treatment needs who are residing in jail, or those reentering the community, with a focus across all interventions on those who are high system utilizers. The OMNI Institute will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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City of Alamosa

Colorado

The City of Alamosa applied for Category 1c tribal/rural area grant funding in the amount of $599,997. The Angel Project will provide a non-arrest, self-referral pathway to connect addicted individuals to intensive case management and harm-reduction resources using the evidence- based Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI) model. The City of Alamosa is creating a system of care that will allow individuals to receive appropriate levels of service and treatment to address root challenges rather than utilizing a criminal justice system clearly not equipped to address substance use disorder effectively. The Angel Project will provide a third pathway into intensive case management, service coordination, and connection to harm- reduction resources. This project serves approximately 50,000 residents in the 12th Judicial District. The project includes partnerships between the City of Alamosa, Center for Restorative Programs, and the 12th Judicial District Office of the District Attorney. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the disproportionate impact of opioids and other substances on the region, the specific challenges faced by rural communities, and the high poverty area served by the project.

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Executive Office of the Governor of Delaware – Criminal Justice Council

Delaware

The Delaware Criminal Justice Council, in partnership with the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, will implement the Delaware Smart Criminal Justice and Treatment Change Team to effectively integrate initiatives, processes, and programs into standard treatment policies and practices maximizing efforts. Grant funds will implement programs to effectively integrate initiatives, processes, and programs into standard treatment policies and practices maximizing efforts. Grant funds will be used to implement comprehensive policies and practices identified in the planning phase and outlined in the coordinated state criminal justice and treatment plan. Subgrants will be awarded that assist and provide financial support to units of local government and community services agencies to implement strategies that support treatment and recovery service engagement; increase the use of diversion and alternatives to incarceration; and reduce the incidence of overdose death. The geographic area is the entire state of Delaware.

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Florida Office of the State Courts Administrator

Florida

The Florida Office of the State Courts Administrator proposes that five established family dependency drug courts increase the number of families they serve and it proposes to institute/enhance peer-support programs; incorporate medication-assisted treatment; establish substance use disorder prevention programs for the children whose parents are participants in family dependency drug court; execute evidence-based, parent-child relationship-strengthening programs; strengthen peer-to-peer collaboration among sites with an annual all-sites meeting and cross-site visits; and increase training and technical assistance regarding substance use disorder and opioid use disorder. This project serves family dependency drug courts in Broward, Palm Beach, Orange, Marion, and Citrus counties. Dr. Barbara Andraka-Christou and her team from the University of Central Florida will serve as the evaluator for this project.

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Fulton County

Georgia

The County of Fulton applied for Category 1a urban grant funding in the amount of $1,200,000. The Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Program will expand Fulton County’s comprehensive efforts to identify, respond to, treat, and support those impacted by substance use disorders and reduce impact on the criminal justice system. The Fulton County Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD) and its partners will expand pre-arrest diversion, case management, and training for law enforcement personnel to the city of Atlanta and two other jurisdictions using the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion model; provide recovery support services including transitional or recovery housing through Fulton DBHDD and its local partners; and offer evidence-based treatment including medication-assisted treatment through partner Grady Hospital. This project serves the city of Atlanta (population 498,044). The project includes partnerships between the Atlanta Fulton Pre-Arrest Diversion Initiative, Grady Hospital, Mary Hall Freedom House, Atlanta Recovery Center, Trinity Community Ministries, Sober Living of America, There’s Another Option, Highsmith Collins, Atlanta Police Department, and the Fulton County Offices of the District Attorney, Public Defender, and Solicitor General. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones, high-poverty areas, and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers, facilities, and emergency medical services. Dr. Kevin Baldwin from Applied Research Services serves as the lead evaluator for the proposed project.

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Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council

Georgia

The Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council applied for Category 2 statewide area grant funding in the amount of $2,289,701. The Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program will (1) establish a multi-locality naloxone initiative to include continued training for law enforcement personnel and provide funding to assist with the replenishment of the opioid reversal drug; (2) establish and implement a pre-arrest/post-booking diversion program for youth and adults who have a moderate to high risk of substance abuse within Athens-Clarke County; (3) provide K-12 youth in Athens-Clarke County with increased access to education and treatment; and (4) provide a comprehensive, real-time, information collection database for the City of Savannah to expand the pre-arrest diversion program, which is funded through the FY 2018 Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site Program (COAP). This project serves serve 23 of Georgia’s 159 counties. The project includes partnerships between Athens-Clarke County Unified Government and City of Savannah.

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Screven County Sheriff's Office

Georgia

The Screven County Sheriff's Office applied for Category 1c tribal/rural grant funding in the amount of $587,825. The Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program will (1) employ needs assessment tools to identify and prioritize services for jail offenders, (2) expand diversion programs for drug offenders to improve responses to offenders at high risk for overdose or substance abuse and provide alternative-to-incarceration services to those suffering from substance abuse disorders, (3) deliver an evidenced-based prevention program, and (4) offer rigorous program evaluation providing feedback and improvement opportunities. This project serves Screven County, Georgia, with a population of 14,300. The project includes partnerships between the Community Service Board of Middle Georgia, Ogeechee Division; Drug Court for the Ogeechee Judicial Circuit; and scientific partners. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a 100 percent rural county, high-poverty area, and Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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Iowa Governor's Office of Drug Control Policy

Iowa

The Iowa Governor’s Office of Drug Control Policy will: • Reduce substance abuse and criminal involvement involving nonviolent individuals by implementing or expanding pre-/post-arrest diversion to treatment in Black Hawk, Story, and Jones Counties. • Expand citizen access to medication disposal in 25 new sites in underserved areas of the state. The Criminal and Juvenile Justice Planning Agency, Iowa’s Statistical Analysis Center, will serve as the evaluator for the project.

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Boone County

Illinois

Boone County applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $599,000. The Boone County Support Outreach Recovery Team will to fill the identified need for a community law enforcement officer to work with the individuals who have been arrested and fill the identified need for an addiction counselor to work with the county’s jailed population. The second purpose of this program is to fill the identified need for an addiction counselor who will work as a recovery coach with Boone County’s jailed population. This individual will deliver services such as moral reconation therapy and substance abuse counseling. This project serves Boone County, Illinois (population 53,606). The project includes partnerships between the Boone County Health Department, the multidisciplinary team, the Rosecrance, and the Belvidere Police Department.

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Boone County

Illinois

The Boone County Health Department will use grant funds to integrate behavioral health services into the jail’s detainee health services, including introducing medication-assisted treatment and initiate a Recovery Navigator program to provide comprehensive case management to detainees and opioid-abusing individuals coming into contact with law enforcement and first responders. The grant funds will support a full-time navigator and project coordinator. The Boone County Task Force will provide direct support to include developing a screening and referral process, identify and implement evidence-based services; develop sustainability and implementation plans, and an evaluation plan to track impacts and outcomes.

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Cook County Health and Hospitals System

Illinois

Cook County Health and Hospital System (CCHHS) and the Office of the Chief Judge (OCJ) are expanding their efforts to reduce the prevalence of opioid addiction in the Adult Probation Department (APD) in Cook County through Category 3. The goal of the proposed project, Universal Opioid Screening in Adult Probation to Reduce Usage and Overdose, is to engage activities around opioid addiction and facilitate training for probation officers and staff members; interagency partnerships for screening, assessment, and coordination of care of opioid use by probationers; and program evaluation.

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Indiana Family and Social Services Administration

Indiana

The Indiana Division of Mental Health and Addiction, in partnership with the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute (ICJI), Choices Coordinated Care Solutions (Choices), Centerstone, Relias Analytics, and the Indiana University Center for Collaborative Systems Change, seeks to address the treatment needs of justice-involved individuals of southern Indiana in seven rural counties. The project will use mobile technology hardware, software, internet connectivity, and Web-based services, along with other available resources, to assess participants in drug courts as well as individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) to gain access to services and provide treatment when necessary as a diversion from charges.

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LaPorte Circuit Court

Indiana

The Circuit Court of LaPorte, Indiana, will develop a family recovery court (FRC) to provide a holistic approach to families of children in need of services (CHINS) with co-occurring substance abuse problems. CHINS cases are filed by the state against parents who are neglecting or abusing their children. Project partners include Choices! Counseling Services, Swanson Center, Department of Child Services, and the Public Defender’s offices. Dr. Roy Fowles from Purdue University Northwest will serve as the researcher.

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Kenton County Fiscal Court

Kentucky

Kenton County Fiscal Court applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program will develop, implement, and expand Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion to policing agencies with pre-arrest diversion coordinators to reduce incarceration and lower the cost to communities and provide a case manager for those leaving incarceration to reduce recidivism. The program will also contract a peer support specialist to assist quick response teams responding to overdoses to establish connections, provide harm-reduction information, and easy access to naloxone. In addition, the program will provide supportive services to those wanting treatment and those in recovery. Supportive services will include referrals to community partners, case management, transportation, recovery housing, assistance with identification and an Indigent Essentials Backpack. This project serves Kenton, Pendleton, and Grant counties with a total population of 205,701. The project includes partnerships between Mental Health America, Northern Kentucky Community Action, Life Learning Center, Transitions, Sun, Alexandria’s Angels, Erlanger Police social workers, and the City of Falmouth.

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City of New Orleans Health Department

Louisiana

The City of New Orleans Health Department proposes to use funds to continue a 2017 COAP-funded post-overdose response, Opioid Survival Connection, and conduct community outreach and education. Outreach and education activities include bystander response training and naloxone distribution to EMS and community members. Grant funds will be used to hire two project coordinators and purchase naloxone, training supplies, and a vehicle. Overdose detection mapping application program will also be implemented. Project partners include University Medical Center Emergency Department, New Orleans EMS, New Orleans Public Library, New Orleans Opioid Task Force, US Drug Enforcement Agency Field Office, Mayor’s Office of Community Engagement, Xavier University College of Pharmacy, and community providers.

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Louisiana Department of Health

Louisiana

The Louisiana Department of Health, Office of Behavioral Health will support access to, and engagement in, treatment and recovery support services for offenders with opioid abuse in Orleans and East Baton Rouge Parishes jails, as well as increased use of diversion in Orleans, Jefferson, and St. Tammany Parishes. This will be accomplished by providing support for peer support specialists and treatment staff members at the Day Reporting Center in New Orleans, which serves both Orleans and Jefferson Parishes, and at the St. Tammany Parish Jail to enable those with opioid use disorders to be assessed and referred to a specialty court.

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City of Brockton

Massachusetts

The city of Brockton will develop a collaborative case management system involving healthcare experts, treatment specialists, police outreach officers, and recovery coaches. The case management team will work intensively to engage the highest risk populations and provide them with resources that will best meet their needs with the goal of sustained engagement in treatment. The project includes partnerships among the city of Brockton, the Champion Plan, Gandara Center, and Brockton Area Multi-Services, Inc. Community Outreach, Prevention, and Education (C.O.P.E.) Center. This project will engage Kelly Research Associates as its research partner.

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City of Holyoke

Massachusetts

The Holyoke Police Department will use funds primarily for salaries that support a project coordinator, a narcotics intervention officer, a recovery coach, and a mental health supervisor. Through the Project Recovery and Engagement of Addicts and Chronic users of Heroin (REACH) Project, the Holyoke Police Department will address the significant opiate drug problem in Holyoke, Massachusetts. Project goals are to decrease the number of overdose victims, decrease the number of narcotics crimes, and increase the support systems for people addicted to opioids in Holyoke.

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City of Holyoke Police Department

Massachusetts

The City of Holyoke Police Department (HPD) applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $597,650. Project ERASE (Expansion of Recovery from Addiction to Substances Efforts) will implement a multicomponent intervention program designed to (1) support individuals with opioid, stimulant, and other illicit substance issues with interventions to reduce addictions and associated mental health needs, (2) reduce overdoses and overdose deaths through prevention and intervention strategies, and (3) reduce substance-related crime in Holyoke. This project serves Behavioral Health Network and Gandara, the Holyoke Police Department, Hampden County Sheriff, Holyoke Probation, and research partners. The project includes partnerships between the House of Corrections to provide detox treatment options and develop a law enforcement liaison between HPD, the courts, and probation personnel. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high-poverty area and enhanced public safety in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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East Bridgewater Police Department

Massachusetts

Plymouth County Outreach (PCO), a police and treatment outreach approach to high-risk individuals, will continue to develop its countywide, multifaceted approach involving law enforcement, hospital, recovery, and local treatment partnerships that conduct post-overdose home follow-up visits to overdose survivors who are not initially admitted to a hospital or treatment services. The local research partner, Kelley Research Associates, created a unique, real-time overdose tracking system that supports the daily overdose response program. The East Bridgewater Police Department will make data available through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Massachusetts Administrative Office of the Trial Court

Massachusetts

The Massachusetts Administrative Office of the Trial Court applied for a Category 2 statewide grant in the amount of $6,000,000. Project NORTH (Navigation, Outreach, Recovery, Treatment, and Hope) will increase treatment engagement and retention, decrease risk of overdose, and reduce risk of justice-system involvement. The objectives of the project are to increase access to evidence-based treatment and care coordination, decrease barriers to treatment retention, increase recovery support and recovery capital, and increase access to overdose-prevention education and naloxone distribution. This project serves 62 communities in 9 counties and 2.7 million people. Proposed locations include Boston, Brockton, Fall River, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, New Bedford, Pittsfield, Quincy, Springfield, Taunton, and Worcester. The project includes partnerships between the Executive Office of Health and Human Services, MassHealth (Medicaid office), Department of Public Health, Department of Mental Health, and the Massachusetts Alliance for Sober Housing. Priority considerations in this application include rural regions, high-poverty areas, and Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Middle District Attorney's Office

Massachusetts

COAP supports the Middle District Attorney’s Office in implementing the Worcester County Drug Diversion Initiative. Clinicians from AdCare Hospital assist law enforcement and prosecutors in identifying and screening individuals who may be appropriate for diversion to substance abuse treatment programs. This program is currently operating out of two locations – Leominster and Gardner/Winchendon District Courts— and it will soon be integrated into five district courts throughout Worcester County. Fitchburg State University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention

Maryland

Maryland’s “Regrounding Our Response: A Coordinated Public Safety and Public Health Approach to the Opioid Epidemic” initiative will establish six new law enforcement assisted diversion (LEAD) sites (St. Mary’s County, Columbia in Howard County, Westminster in Carroll County, Annapolis City in Anne Arundel County, Hagerstown in Washington County, and Cumberland in Allegany County), support three existing LEAD sites (Belair in Harford County, Wicomico County, and Baltimore City), and support detention-based interventions in partnership with the Office of the Public Defender in five of the nine sites. The objectives include: (1) reduce recidivism in LEAD participants; (2) reduce calls for service for drug-related activity in the target areas; (3) reduce criminal justice costs incurred by LEAD participants; and (4) improve police understanding of and response to issues related to addiction and mental health disorders. The Maryland Statistical Analysis Center will support the research, performance management, and evaluation of all the selected sites.

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Cass County, Inc.

Michigan

Cass County, Inc. applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The Cass County COSSAP Project will employ a collaborative and comprehensive “gap-filling” approach to develop, implement, and/or expand/enhance existing trauma-informed evidence-based programming in order to identify, respond to, treat, and support those affected by illicit opioids, stimulants, and other substances. Objectives include the expansion of access to supervision, treatment, and recovery support services across the criminal justice system. The program will also create co-responder crisis intervention teams of trained law enforcement officers and behavioral health practitioners to connect individuals to trauma-informed and evidence-based co-occurring SUD treatment and recovery support services, as well as provide overdose education and prevention activities, and address the needs of children impacted by substance abuse. The project includes partnerships between 43rd Circuit Court judges, Woodlands Behavioral Healthcare Network, Office of the Sheriff, Office of the Prosecutor, Community Corrections, defense attorney, program coordinator, and the program evaluator. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the challenges that rural communities face and Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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City of Detroit

Michigan

The Detroit Police Department’s Opioid Abuse Diversion Program will create and implement a law enforcement-led pre- and post-arrest diversion in Detroit using the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) model. The School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project. The applicant agreed to provide data through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Clare County

Michigan

The Clare County, Michigan, Prosecuting Attorney’s Office will establish a task force to focus on drug-related problems, to include the opioid epidemic. Representatives from all five of the law enforcement agencies that service Clare County, medical personnel, substance abuse counselors, pharmacists, a representative from probation and parole, and any other professionals who are identified during the implementation will comprise the task force. Federal agencies will also be invited to participate in the task force to participate in investigations that might be more effectively prosecuted at the federal level. The assistant prosecutor in charge of the program will coordinate with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District.

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Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians

Michigan

The Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians (GTB) applied for Category 1c tribal/rural area grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The GTB COSSAP Project will address the current substance use issues identified by Grand Traverse Band’s Behavioral Health intakes, with statistics confirming the continued need for substance use services and recovery support for adolescents and adult federally recognized Native Americans who are experiencing depression, trauma, suicide ideation, and co-occurring disorders. This project serves 5,100 Native Americans in the GTB six-county service area located in lower northwest Michigan (Antrim, Benzie, Charlevoix, Grand Traverse, Leelanau, and Manistee counties). The project includes partnerships between GTB Public Safety and the GTB Tribal Court departments. Priority considerations addressed in this application include addressing specific challenges that rural communities face.

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St. Joseph County

Michigan

The County of St. Joseph applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The County of St. Joseph COSSAP Project will employ a collaborative and comprehensive “gap-filling” approach to develop, implement, and/or expand/enhance existing trauma-informed evidence-based programming in order to identify, respond to, treat, and support those affected by illicit opioids, stimulants, and other substances. Objectives include the expansion of access to supervision, treatment, and recovery support services across the criminal justice system. The project will also create Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) to enhance co-responder crisis intervention teams to connect individuals to trauma-informed and evidence-based co-occurring SUD treatment and recovery support services; provide overdose education and prevention activities; and address the needs of children impacted by substance abuse. This project serves St. Joseph County, Michigan, with a population of 60,964. The project includes partnerships between the 45th Circuit Court of Michigan, sheriff, Community Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, defense attorney, Office of the Prosecutor, Community Corrections, program evaluator, and program coordinator. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the specific challenges that rural communities face and a Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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Minnesota Department of Public Safety—Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

Minnesota

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS) will support the “Timely Treatment, Strengthened Service, and Effective Evaluation for Overdose Prevention: Linkage to Care Across Minnesota” project to achieve the following objectives in eight sites: • Reduce opioid misuse and opioid overdose death by supporting local efforts to implement effective opioid overdose prevention projects. • Support local efforts to implement treatment and recovery support linkage activities serving individuals vulnerable for drug overdose. • Support implementation of local multidisciplinary intervention models to bring together stakeholders with different perspectives and different information to identify drug overdose prevention strategies. • Enhance access to naloxone among people who use drugs to decrease overdose deaths. • Enhance successful local multidisciplinary overdose prevention activities to decrease overdose deaths. • Evaluate the extent to which additional funding to eight opioid overdose prevention projects, referred to as “Tackling Opioid Use With Networks (TOWN)”, impact the incidence of overdose in communities. • Create a TOWN Manual in collaboration with the communities to support the expansion and sustainability of the TOWN model. The eight sites will implement three evidence-based activities: (1) peer recovery specialists in emergency departments; (2) treatment linkage by emergency medical services; and (3) overdose fatality review teams. The project will also enhance six Minnesota Department of Public Safety-funded syringe services programs by providing each site with naloxone to distribute to participants who use opioids. Dr. Catherine Diamond from the Minnesota Department of Health will lead the project evaluation.

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29th Judicial Circuit Court

Missouri

The 29th Judicial Circuit Court applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $887,194. The Jasper County Treatment Program (JCTP) will provide a postbooking connection to clinical treatment indicated by evidence-based needs for all offenders per screening for substance abuse, mental illness, criminogenic risk, and connection to enhanced treatment for family-based offenders. The program will also provide court-ordered referrals into the JCTP and referral into other offender programming as indicated for nonfamily substance abuse offenders, as well as develop individualized treatment plans for family-based substance abuse offenders. Also, the program will provide case management of JCTP participants targeting substance abuse and co-occurring disorders and communicate community treatment program participation requirements (i.e., probation conditions, such as mandatory counseling session participation, MAT plan compliance, drug testing, and court reporting). This project serves Jasper County (population 120,217). Priority considerations addressed in this application include eight high-poverty areas and a Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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City of St. Louis Circuit Attorney's Office

Missouri

The City of St. Louis Circuit Attorney’s Office (CAO) is requesting funding for St. Louis Circuit Attorney Navigation, Diversion, and Opportunity program: a post-arrest diversion program offered on a pre-booking, pre-charge, or pre-plea basis to individuals with low-level drug possession charges—providing them with education, access to treatment and wrap-around case management services as an alternative to incarceration. The program will serve individuals who have committed opioid-related offenses in the City of St. Louis, Missouri, program eligibility will be determined by the location of the offense, not the residency of the participant. Participants will receive treatment, healthcare, housing, and employment services through referral partnerships with Affinia Healthcare, Queen of Peace Center, CareSTL Health, The Missouri Network for Opiate Reform and Recovery, MO Better Living, and the St. Louis Agency on Training and Employment. Additionally, the CAO will work with the St. Louis Director of Public Safety to facilitate the creation of a citation referral system with the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department. Funding will support a full-time project manager, three full-time case managers, half-time administrative staff, emergency financial assistance, and metro tickets to participants. The University of Missouri St. Louis – Missouri Institute of Mental Health (UMSL-MIMH) will serve as the evaluation partner.

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Lamar County Board of Supervisors

Mississippi

The Lamar County Board of Supervisors applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $599,981. The Lamar County LEAD Program will develop a trauma-informed, comprehensive, community-based response to divert individuals experiencing opioid or stimulant misuse/abuse from the criminal justice system to treatment. The objectives are to (1) divert 100 individuals with SUD from the criminal justice system to treatment and case management service providers, and (2) provide harm-reduction case management services to 150 individuals with SUD. A total of 250 individuals will be served over the project period. This project serves Lamar County, Mississippi, which has a population of 63,300. The project includes partnerships between Pine Belt Mental Healthcare Resources’ Grant and Research Department. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities and emergency medical services, and rural challenges.

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City of Billings

Montana

The City of Billings applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Billings Peer Support Diversion Program (Billings PSDP) will develop a peer support-driven prebooking diversion program that provides support for individuals at high risk of overdose or chronic substance abuse. The program will use trained and certified peer support specialists, working independently and embedded with law enforcement to engage in street outreach with the chronically homeless through mobile behavioral health crisis response. The primary objective of the project is to use evidence-based strategies to divert high-risk individuals from incarceration into treatment and social support services. The project will also overcome local barriers related to length of treatment for methamphetamine recovery and limited recovery housing options in the community. This project serves individuals who have been arrested and chronically homeless individuals with opioid or stimulant use disorders in all of Yellowstone County, with a focus on downtown Billings, where this population is concentrated. The project includes partnerships among the City of Billings, Billings Police Department, Downtown Billings Association, and Rimrock, Montana’s largest mental health and substance abuse treatment provider. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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Buncombe County Health and Human Services

North Carolina

Buncombe County Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) proposes to connect individuals at risk of overdose with substance use treatment and peer support; provide transitional or recovery housing for individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) leaving the jails or the emergency department; develop programs to address the opioid epidemic in rural areas; develop and implement a comprehensive plan to reduce the risk of overdose death and enhance treatment and recovery service engagement among the pretrial and post-trial populations leaving jails; and support the timely collection and integration of data to provide an understanding of drug trends, support program evaluation, inform clinical decision-making, identify at-risk individuals or populations, and support investigations. Buncombe County DHHS, the Sheriff’s Office, and Emergency Medical Services will implement the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Catawba County

North Carolina

The County of Catawba applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The purpose of the project is to expand the current Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program by offering additional financial support for Officer training and engagement in order to grow the referral pool. Second, funds will be used to further develop an existing jail services program to include a more robust pretrial diversion program. Finally, funds will be used to implement a new transitional, reentry housing program to be utilized by both LEAD and jail services. This project serves Catawba County, North Carolina, with a population of 150,000 people. The project includes partnerships between the Cognitive Connection and Rebound Treatment Center. Catawba Valley Behavioral Health has existing relationships with the local sheriff’s department, five local police departments and the Districts Attorney’s Office through the LEAD program. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high rates of overdose and overdose death.

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Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

North Carolina

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ Integrated Opioid Abuse Program will develop a task force composed of tribal decision makers who will create policies and keep agencies accountable to indicators of success. A multidisciplinary team will provide direct services to high-frequency drug users and their families. These two teams will work together to develop a plan to create a secured mental health/opioid abuse treatment center and secure transportation for participants becoming certified peer recovery support specialists.

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Wayne County Sheriff's Office

North Carolina

The Wayne County Detention Center, through the Wayne County Sheriff’s Office, applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The purpose of the project is to provide best practices in developing, implementing, and sustaining a jail-based medication-assisted treatment (MAT) program during incarceration and upon release. The benefits include stemming the cycle of arrest, incarceration, and release typically linked to substance use disorders; helping to maintain a safe and secure jail for inmates and staff; and reducing costs, since data indicate that MAT for opioid use disorders is cost-effective. This project serves Wayne County, North Carolina, which is the fourth largest agricultural county in the state with over 123,000 residents. The project includes partnerships between Southern Health Partners, Wayne County’s Day Reporting Center, Wayne County Health Department, and One to One with Youth, Inc. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones and persistent poverty.

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Bergen County

New Jersey

The County of Bergen applied for a Category 1a urban area grant in the amount of $1,200,000. The BCPO-COSSAP Project will establish a comprehensive, evidence-based response to the opioid crisis. This response will be composed of multiple teams and initiatives, including the Heroin Addiction Recovery Team (HART), Fair Lawn Initiative (FLI), and a county-level Overdose Fatality Review Team. These teams will work independently and share data to best coordinate response needs for opioid and addiction needs across Bergen County. This project serves Bergen County, which is home to 948,046 residents. The project includes partnerships between the Bergen County Police Chiefs Association; Bergen County police departments; Newark Community Solutions, Center for Court Innovation; Center for Alcohol and Drug Resources, a division of Children’s Aid and Family Services; Bergen County Health Department and Division of Alcohol and Drug Dependency; and New Bridge Medical Center. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Bergen County’s 12 Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Camden County

New Jersey

Camden County, New Jersey, plans to implement the Camden County Opioid Abuse Diversion Program (CCOAD) to improve treatment and support services for individuals with a history of opioid abuse diagnosis. These interventions will specifically target the pre-trial and reentry intercepts of the Sequential Intercept Model. The initial phase of CCOAD entailed conducting a comprehensive assessment of individuals incarcerated in the Camden County Correctional Facility (CCCF) to document the extent of the opioid crisis in the Camden County jail, subsequently setting up wraparound services at the pre-trial and reentry intercepts. The second phase of the program entails the integration of specialized care managers to work intensely with individuals with an opioid abuse diagnosis upon their release to help them navigate treatment options and resources as well as advocacy specific to housing, employment, legal challenges, and access to social services. In addition, CCOAD will include a comprehensive ongoing analysis on the effectiveness of strategies used by the program. The Walter Rand Institute of Public Affairs at Rutgers University will serve as the project’s research partner.

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City of Newark

New Jersey

The Newark Police Division will use grant funds to support a pre-arraignment diversion program in partnership with the Essex County Prosecutor’s Office and Newark Community Solutions. Police officers will be trained to identify signs and symptoms of opioid abuse and dependency and will flag individuals arrested on eligible charges. The Essex County Prosecutor’s Office will determine eligibility and Newark Community Solutions will support participants. Newark Community Solutions will hire a full-time coordinator, full-time case manager, and part-time case manager. The Center for Court Innovation will provide analytic and training support and Rutgers University will serve as the research partner.

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City of Paterson

New Jersey

The City of Paterson, New Jersey, applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Paterson Coalition for Opioid Assessment and Response (Pat-COAR) will support for a peer recovery support specialist to perform proactive outreach on a group and personalized basis with residents in “hot spot” areas, as identified based on the collective data and research of Pat-COAR. The program will also support an Overdose Fatality Review Team to better analyze and understand overdose cases and trends, allowing Pat-COAR to identify any gaps in services or policies that would potentially minimize its high rate of overdoses. Also, the program provides to hire staff needed to build the capacity and sustainability of Pat-COAR over time, as well as support the proposed activities. This project serves the city of Paterson, which has a population of 145,800 residents. The project includes partnerships between law enforcement entities from the local (Paterson Police Department), county (Passaic County Prosecutor’s Office), and interstate/federal (New York/New Jersey High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area) levels; addiction and health professionals from local (Paterson Department of Health and Human Services/Division of Health), county (Passaic County Department of Health and Human Services/Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services), and regional (St. Joseph’s University Medical Center) levels; community-based partners who work hands-on to develop policy (Health Coalition of Passaic County) and programs (Eva’s Village) to support the region’s substance-using residents; and traditional Narcan distributors (Paterson Fire Department and Paterson Emergency Medical Services). Priority considerations addressed in this application include the needs of high-poverty areas; supporting law enforcement in Qualified Opportunity Zones; and addressing areas with a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin/opioids, high rates of overdose deaths, and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers.

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State of New Jersey, Department of Law and Public Safety

New Jersey

The New Jersey Department of Law and Public Safety (DLPS) will use grant funds to create a coordinated plan, formulated with pertinent stakeholders, to assess how best to leverage available data, resources, and funding streams to establish opioid response teams in the five most at-risk and in-need municipalities in New Jersey to add another point of entry to treatment for opioid-addicted individuals. The New Jersey DLPS will offer subawards to help fund opioid response teams at the local level. DLPS’s goal for the program is to provide crisis intervention for opioid-addicted individuals at multiple entry points, thus facilitating another link to treatment and recovery programs through law enforcement.

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Bernalillo County

New Mexico

Bernalillo County in New Mexico will use grant funds to expand access to treatment and recovery support services across behavioral health, primary care, criminal justice, and emergency management services. Grant funds will be used to hire a full-time coordinator and two case managers. The county and partners will engage in comprehensive planning; create a mobile harm reduction center staffed by a nurse and the two case managers; increase medication-assisted treatment (MAT) for off reservation urban Indians; provide transitional housing for underserved youth and their families; and provide MAT to incarcerated youth. The University of New Mexico Institute for Social Research will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Dona Ana County

New Mexico

The Dona Ana County Health and Human Services Department will implement a law enforcement assisted diversion program and other activities aimed at reducing opioid use and mitigating the impact on individuals and communities. The project includes a coordinator and case manager as well as services from the National Alliance on Mental Illnesses for peer support and the Las Cruces Police Department for officer training and implementation costs. Naloxone will also be purchased, funds will be used for transitional housing, and trauma-informed training. New Mexico State University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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New Mexico Human Services Department

New Mexico

The New Mexico Human Services Department applied for Category 2 statewide area grant funding in the amount of $6,000,000. The implementation and enhancement of Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) programs in New Mexico will reduce criminal behavior, decrease criminal justice and emergency health service utilization, and improve public safety by supporting the development of LEAD in tribal and nontribal jurisdictions. The project aims to reduce drug overdose and improve the quality of life for people with a substance use disorder while supporting a coordinated collaborative response to behavioral health among criminal justice, social service, and public health systems. This project serves approximately 900,000 residents in New Mexico. The project includes partnerships between Bernalillo County, Santa Fe County, Taos County, Lea County, San Juan County and San Miguel County. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the high rate of individuals in New Mexico jails and prisons estimated to have an untreated substance use disorder and the high rates of racial disparity in corrections.

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Pueblo of Pojoaque

New Mexico

The Pueblo of Pojoaque will create the Pueblo of Pojoaque Opioid Prevention and Intervention Project, a court-based, pre-prosecution diversion program. A project coordinator and an outreach worker/case manager will be hired. The State of New Mexico Sentencing Commission will serve as the evaluation partner for the proposed project.

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Albany County

New York

Albany County applied for a Category 1b suburban area grant in the amount of $898,062. The Growing LEAD: Increasing Operational Capacity to Improve and Expand Service in Albany County program will be increased with the addition of case managers to grow caseload capacity by 200 percent, an increase of approximately 50 new clients annually. Additionally, a full-time, dedicated project director and community engagement and outreach coordinator will be hired to improve coordination between partners and the public, increase public awareness of LEAD, and develop policies and procedures to better serve LEAD communities. This project serves the city of Albany, with a population of over 97,000. The project includes partnerships between Albany County Executive Office, District Attorney’s Office, sheriff, mayor of Albany, City of Albany Police Department, Center for Law and Justice, and Central Avenue Business Improvement District. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Erie County

New York

The County of Erie applied for Category 1a urban area grant funding in the amount of $1,200,000. The Erie County New York Comprehensive Quick Response Program to Overdose will enhance the county’s Law Enforcement Diversion Programs using the Quick Response Program to Overdose (QRP model). The model will blend various strategies to work in a comprehensive manner, including expanding naloxone distribution/deployment by law enforcement, police remotely referring overdose survivors from the field to MAT in emergency departments (using the Buffalo MATTERS telemedicine appointment capability), and leveraging the HIDTA ODMAP app to link survivors to the public health peer teams for follow-up and navigation to long-term treatment agencies. The Erie County Comprehensive Quick Response Program to Overdose will provide a seamless flow after an opioid overdose rescue by police. ODMAP will initiate a follow-up through the public health peer response team, who will reach out to the survivor to offer support at each stage of the process and track their engagement with treatment. This project serves Erie County, with a population of 925,702. The project includes partnerships between public health, law enforcement, emergency medicine services, high- intensity drug trafficking areas (ODMAP program), county mental health, family advocates, and the SUNY at Buffalo research evaluation partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include targeting high-poverty areas and designated Qualified Opportunity Zones in economically distressed areas of Erie County.

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New York State Unified Court System

New York

The New York State Unified Court System will partner with the Center for Court Innovation (CCI) and the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services to implement the New York State Opioid Reduction Teleservices Program. Up to three opioid courts will be selected—based on demonstrated need and rural location—to receive technology-based access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) providers. The court system and CCI researchers will develop materials to educate the field about using remote technology to improve treatment, judicial monitoring, and MAT induction.

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Office of the Bronx County District Attorney

New York

The Bronx District Attorney, in partnership with the Bronx Criminal Court and the Center for Court Innovation/Bronx Community Solutions, will address the crisis in opioid deaths and overdose by enhancing the Overdose Avoidance Recovery (OAR) Program. This enhanced OAR Program will be expanded into two additional courtrooms. BetaGov/Litmus at NYU will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, Inc. at OASAS

New York

The Research Foundation for Mental Hygiene, Inc. at The New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse (OASAS) proposes the New York Opioid Court Treatment Enhancement Project to enhance and evaluate substance abuse treatment and recovery support service systems treating offenders participating in ten opioid courts in Troy, Elmira, Watertown, Canandaigua, Niagara Falls, Montgomery, Rockland, Nassau, Queens, and Staten Island. OASAS is working in collaboration with the New York State Unified Court System (UCS) to expand treatment and recovery support services to serve offenders in opioid courts the moment they enter the criminal justice system. UCS is initiating opioid court models based on the original model established by the Buffalo Opioid Intervention Court in 2017. The project will engage the Lerner Center for Public Health Promotion at Syracuse University as the research partner for this project.

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Seneca Nation of Indians

New York

The Seneca Nation of Indians Peacemakers Court will address the increasing number of opioid overdoses and overdose-related deaths in the Seneca National Territories by reducing reliance on emergency health care and the criminal justice system by high-frequency opioid users. In partnership with Seneca Strong, a community-based drug and alcohol prevention and recovery program, the Peacemakers Court will create a community-driven, culturally competent diversion project that will specifically target Native American opioid utilizers who have a high number of contacts with multiple systems. The project coordinator will assemble a multidisciplinary team responsible for developing the program’s policy and procedures. Programming will include culturally specific professionals and confidential trainings and individualized wraparound services, in addition to a data analysis.

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The City of Ithaca

New York

The City of Ithaca applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Ithaca LEAD Program (ILP) will reduce repeated arrests and incarceration for people whose unlawful conduct stems from unmet behavioral health needs in the city of Ithaca and adjacent towns in Tompkins County, New York. ILP will reduce racial disparities in criminal justice involvement for the region’s African-American population, reduce unnecessary arrests and prosecutions imposed on the justice system, improve officer efficiency, maximize the value of the city’s community-based service array, and improve outcomes for this complex population. In the era of COVID-19, these changes are especially critical. Across the nation, officers are confronting new challenges in interacting with people on the street; jails are striving to reduce incarceration so as to mitigate COVID-19 risks; and judges, attorneys, and court staff are seeking to reduce congestion in courtrooms. This project serves the city of Ithaca, New York. The project includes partnerships with Tompkins County District Attorney and Legislature, Community Leadership Team DCI, Ithaca Police Department, Tompkins County Sheriff, REACH Medical, Greater Ithaca Activities Center, and the LEAD National Support Bureau. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones, as well as challenges faced by rural communities and high-poverty areas.

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Adams County

Ohio

The Adams County Health Department will embed a community care coordinator within the Sheriff's Office, Probation Department and County Court to provide a real-time interface between community recovery resources and the criminal justice system; expand capacity of the quick response team; expand drug treatment opportunities to incarcerated individuals, including MAT; establish peer recovery support for individuals returning to the community before release; establish a Handle with Care program; and establish an overdose fatality review committee.

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Butler County Mental Health and Addiction Recovery Services Board

Ohio

Butler County will expand the existing pilot Quick Response Team (QRT) to the more rural areas of the county, establish victim services by hiring a care coordinator, expand school-based groups for children of opiate abusers, and establish law enforcement and court-based diversion options for nonviolent opioid abusers. Miami University of Ohio will serve as the local research partner. The applicant agreed to provide data through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Butler County of Ohio

Ohio

Butler County of Ohio applied for Category 1B grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Butler County COSSAP project aims to reduce the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances on individuals within its communities, through reducing the number of overdose fatalities, as well as mitigating the impacts of on crime victims by supporting comprehensive, collaborative initiatives. This project serves Butler County, home to a population of 382,000. The project includes a partnership with Miami University’s Center for School-based Mental Health Programs. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural challenges in a high-poverty area and Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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Franklin County

Ohio

Between 2003 and 2015, Franklin County experienced a 343 percent increase in residents dying from drug-related overdoses. To combat what the DEA has referred to as “Ground Zero” of the opiate and carfentanil crisis, the government of Franklin County, Ohio, will implement the Diversion Alternative–Project Opioid (DA–PO) program, a comprehensive and multifaceted approach to reducing the impact of the opioid crisis. Expanding treatment and support services and reducing the number of overdoses and fatalities are the project’s main goals. In addition, the DA–PO program calls for planning and implementation of a Community Mayor's Drug Court, the launch of a robust harm-reduction campaign that will include hosting town hall meetings, distributing naloxone kits to families of overdose survivors, and distributing fentanyl test strips to those in active addiction. Mighty Crow Media will partner with Franklin County as the project’s researcher.

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Franklin County Municipal Court

Ohio

Franklin County Municipal Court applied under Category 1A for grant funding in the amount of $903,289 to support and enhance its MAT, Assessment, Referral, Care and Hope (MARCH) project. This project serves Franklin County and the areas surrounding Columbus, Ohio, with an estimated population of 922,223. The purpose of the project is to continue to fund, expand, and enhance the court’s MAT program — an innovative and effective collaborative effort among Franklin County and City of Columbus justice and government stakeholders. Grant funds would continue to support the positions of MAT project manager and one community case manager through 2023. Enhancements would add an additional community case manager and a contracted peer support specialist to significantly increase the capacity of the program, opening more days to in-custody referrals and facilitating the offering of a full-time behavioral health walk-in clinic. The project includes partnerships between Franklin County Municipal Court, Columbus City Attorney, Office of Justice Policy and Programs, Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, Franklin County ADAMH Board, and a variety of community behavioral health providers. The MARCH program will enhance public safety in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Guernsey County

Ohio

The Guernsey County Sheriff’s Office will increase support services for those impacted by addiction. The key component of the proposal is the implementation of a diversion program with an evidence-based curriculum at the Justice Center. Funds were also requested to purchase and install equipment to increase the safety and security of inmates in the county jail by improving the intake process at the jail.

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Hocking County

Ohio

The Hocking County Prosecutor’s Office, in collaboration with the Hocking County Sheriff’s Office, local treatment providers, and the Hocking County Health Department, has expanded an administrator role for the Hocking Overdose Partnership Endeavor (HOPE). HOPE is a coordinated, multi-disciplinary intervention and risk-reduction response team that is dedicated to connecting individuals who are at risk for overdose and/or survivors of a non-fatal overdose and their families with substance abuse and behavioral health treatment providers or peer recovery supports. HOPE consists of law enforcement, other first responders, treatment providers, child welfare providers, public health providers, and the prosecutor’s office. The applicant agreed to make data available through Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Clackamas County, Health Housing and Human Services

Oregon

Clackamas County applied for grant funding in the amount of $900,000 under Category 1B for the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) Plus project. This project serves the 424,747 residents of Clackamas County, which consists of urban, suburban, and rural areas spanning 1,879 square miles (larger than the state of Rhode Island). The primary goals of LEAD Plus are to continue and enhance the implementation of the LEAD program and add a new layer of coordination that connects the many opioid and substance abuse efforts in the county into a truly comprehensive and integrated approach. Key partners included in this project include the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Milwaukie Police Department, the Indigent Defense Corporation, homeless/houseless service providers, and substance abuse treatment providers. There are no priority considerations with this project.

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Marion County

Oregon

Marion County will expand its Law Enforcement-Assisted Diversion (LEAD) initiative in targeted neighborhoods in Salem, Oregon. The Oregon Criminal Justice Commission will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Multnomah County Health Department

Oregon

The Multnomah County Health Department will use grant funds to embed an opioid use disorder (OUD) corrections counselor and peer recovery mentors in booking for Multnomah County. The individuals in these positions will identify persons in need of OUD treatment and assist them in successfully engaging with recovery programs that offer medication-assisted therapy (MAT). A full-time coordinator will be employed to engage partners in a planning process to further identify gaps and refine project strategies, as well as ongoing coordination of opioid overdose strategies for populations with OUD. A focus of the grant activities is to screen and identify offenders for OUD and provide navigation services and peer recovery support to connect them to treatment, including MAT, and other critical resources. Dr. David Dowler of Program Design and Evaluation Services will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) will fund projects for counties that work with the Technical Assistance Center at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy’s Program Evaluation and Research Unit to implement evidence-based programs to reduce overdose deaths.

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Rhode Island State Police

Rhode Island

The Rhode Island State Police will implement the Heroin-Opioid Prevention Effort (HOPE) Initiative, the nation’s first statewide law enforcement-led opioid overdose outreach program, modeled after the Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI). The HOPE Initiative engages law enforcement personnel in a proactive outreach strategy to combat the opioid overdose epidemic by bringing together substance-use professionals and members of law enforcement with the mission of reaching out to those who are at risk of overdosing and encouraging them to be assessed and treated. The project will support the HOPE Initiative by enhancing the ongoing efforts of state and local government to address the opioid overdose epidemic, including gathering real-time law enforcement data on opioid overdoses to identify individuals with opioid use disorder. In addition, the project will support a program involving law enforcement and case management to provide outreach to individuals with opioid use disorder. Outreach efforts will include victims and child welfare services. Data gathered through the HOPE Initiative will be shared with the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP). Kelley Research Associates will serve as the project evaluator.

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Lancaster County

South Carolina

Lancaster County, South Carolina, will implement a pre-arrest diversion program based on the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) model. A research partner will be selected at the time of the award. The applicant agreed to make data available through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Oconee County

South Carolina

The purpose of this program is to design and implement a collaborative intervention strategy that provides (pre-booking or post-booking) treatment alternative-to-incarceration programs serving individuals at high risk for overdose or substance abuse utilizing evidence-based recovery support services (transitional/recovery housing and peer support) and medication-assisted treatment (MAT). To meet these objectives, the proposed initiative will provide: 1) assessment-based individualized treatment plans, 2) MAT (Medication Assisted Treatment), 3) transitional housing at the OARS Center, 4) cognitive behavioral therapy, and 5) peer support services. Services will be delivered in the Oconee Addiction Recovery & Solutions Center located adjacent to the Oconee Law Enforcement Center that, as a communitywide enterprise, was recently renovated for this purpose. OARS will coordinate with the Oconee County Sheriff’s Office, the Oconee County Detention Center, the Oconee County Drug Court, the 10th Judicial Circuit Solicitor’s Office, and the Center for Family Medicine to deliver the proposed initiative through: 1) the development of a comprehensive, locally driven evidence-based response to opioids, stimulants, and other substances with expanded access to supervision, treatment, and recovery support services; 2) supporting law enforcement and other first responder diversion programs for nonviolent drug offenders to improve responses to offenders at high risk for overdose or substance abuse and provide alternative-to-incarceration services to those suffering from substance abuse disorders; 3) needs assessment tools to identify and prioritize services for jail offenders; 4) the use of evidenced-based treatment practices; and 5) rigorous program evaluation by Clemson University providing feedback and improvement opportunities.

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South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services

South Carolina

The South Carolina Department of Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse Services will assist in developing a medication-assisted treatment (MAT) project in York County, in partnership with the Sixteenth Judicial Circuit Solicitor’s Office, the York County Sheriff’s Office, and treatment partners. Winthrop University will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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Minnehaha County

South Dakota

Minnehaha County applied under Category 1b for grant funding in the amount of $900,000 under the reporting umbrella of the Minnehaha County Sheriff’s Office. This project serves the population of Minnehaha County, which includes a population of 186,749 residents. The purpose of the project is to reduce reliance of the criminal justice system to deal with individuals with substance abuse disorders. The project includes partnerships between Minnehaha County (Sheriff’s Office, SAO, Human Services), the Sioux Falls Police Department, Avera Hospital, Urban Indian Health, and the University of South Dakota. The program-specific priority area the applicant will address is the lack of accessibility to treatment providers. The OJP policy priority area the applicant will address is to enhance public safety in four Qualified Opportunity Zones. The applicant will partner with researchers in the Department of Family Medicine at the University of South Dakota to submit performance measurement and related assessments (including a gap assessment) to make data-informed decisions. These deliverables will also include assessments of the peer navigator and associated program. Final reports will be produced that summarize community crime changes and analysis of benefits to Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Cocke County, Tennessee, Government

Tennessee

Cocke County Government, located in the rural Appalachian Mountain region of eastern Tennessee, applied for grant funding under Subcategory 1b in the amount of $899,488. This project serves Tennessee's 4th Judicial District, which includes Cocke, Sevier, Jefferson, and Grainger counties and has a total combined population of 212,069. The purpose of the proposed Tennessee Recovery Oriented Compliance Strategy (TN-ROCS) Enhancement and Evaluation project is (1) to increase the capacity of this innovative court-based intervention program to link individuals across the district at high risk of overdose to appropriate, evidence-based behavioral health treatment and recovery support services; and (2) to independently validate the TN-ROCS model, such that key findings related to program quality and implementation fidelity can inform current and future data-driven expansion efforts. This project includes partnerships between Cocke County, 4th Judicial District Circuit Court Judge Duane Slone, Dr. Stephen Loyd, Dr. Jennifer Anderson, American Institutes for Research, and Rulo Strategies. All four priority considerations are addressed in this application. Cocke County is a geographically isolated rural area that is plagued by persistently high rates of poverty, substance use, and overdose fatality. Additionally, one census tract within Cocke County (9207.00) has been designated as a Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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Sevier County Government

Tennessee

Sevier County will enhance the Sevier County Offender Recovery Program (SCORP), a comprehensive, collaborative effort to identify and refer individuals to treatment and recovery following incarceration. Interventions begin during incarceration; however, the majority of services are provided immediately at release during the probationary period. Funds will be used to hire a peer mentor coordinator, a women’s service liaison, and a probation/life skills coach for incarcerated women enrolled in the program and expand the substance abuse prevention education program to include the families of SCORP participants.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services will develop the Sullivan County Overdose Response Team (SCORT) in Sullivan County. Grant funds will be used to support a coordinator and peer navigator(s), and a case manager will provide support services to both individuals who have overdosed and victims as well as administrative grant support. The case manager will also coordinate with the Tennessee Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (TADEC) and the Sullivan County District Attorney’s Office through the Sullivan County Family Justice Center. The SCORT coordinator will be responsible for exporting and uploading all relevant data into the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP) data collection tool. An independent evaluator will serve as the project evaluator.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services will develop the Hamilton County Police and Community Overdose Response Team (PCORT) in Hamilton County. Grant funds will be used to support a coordinator and peer navigator(s), and a case manager will provide support services to both individuals who have overdosed and victims, as well as providing administrative grant support. The case manager will also coordinate with the Tennessee Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (TADEC) and the Hamilton County District Attorney’s Office through the Hamilton County Family Justice Center. The PCORT coordinator will be responsible for exporting and uploading all relevant data into the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP) data collection tool. An independent evaluator will serve as the project evaluator.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services is applying for category 2 in the amount of $6,000,000. This project will increase local community’s capacity to respond to the presence of Substance Use Disorders (SUDs) among justice involved individuals and reduce the impact of SUDs among justice involved individuals. This project will include partnerships with the Tennessee Department of Health to support the expansion of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) in COSSAP jail sites and the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation to support Drug Endangered Children Task Forces, Field Based Drug Testing, and overdose data mapping. This project serves to support ten new implementation project sites; 1) Blount, 2) Roane, 3) Anderson, 4) Bradley, 5) Dickson, 6) Cheatham, 7) Roane, 8) Tipton, 9) Grundy and 10) Montgomery counties. Priority Considerations: Qualified Opportunity Zones: All 10 sites targeted for this COSSAP project have Qualified Opportunity Zones in their county: See Attachment 6. High-Poverty Areas or Persistent-Poverty Counties: Two of the targeted counties: Grundy and Cocke are rated by the TN Dept of Economic and Community Development as “Distressed”, while the other eight (8) counties are rated as “Transitional”. Poverty rates for all targeted counties are above the national average (12.3%) with Grundy (28.5%), Cocke (25.0%) and Bradley (18.0%) all exceeding the Statewide poverty rate of 16.7%. Address Specific Challenges That Rural Communities Face: Six of the ten sites selected have more than (50%) of their population residing in rural areas, which Grundy County having (100%) of its population residing in a rural area.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse will: • Support six new implementation project sites (Davidson, Montgomery, Sumner, Putnam, Wilson, and Washington counties) as well as five enhancement project sites for counties that are currently COAP funded (Sullivan, Hamilton, Knox, Jefferson, and Coffee Counties). Sullivan and Hamilton Counties will (1) embed behavioral health clinicians with law enforcement; (2) provide employment readiness and connection to employment services both pre- and post-incarceration; and/or (3) deliver evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy courses. • Enhance six regional drug-endangered children response teams in Dickson, Cheatham, Lawrence, Franklin, Jefferson, and Scott Counties. Response teams will use a collaborative approach in meeting the needs of children affected by drug overdose events as well as their parents. The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation will also implement a statewide prevention strategy by creating a virtual reality game with education content for students to engage with at school events. • Integrate three certified peer recovery support specialist (CPRS) positions in probation and parole offices across the state, one in each of the three Grand Divisions of Tennessee. • Provide recovery support services, including recovery housing, as part of a comprehensive response. Dr. Carolyn Marie Audet and Lauren Allard will serve as the research partners for this project.

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Bexar County Commissioners Court

Texas

Bexar County Commissioners Court will create a strategic plan, develop a dashboard of all data related to opioid use and abuse, and fund evidence-based outpatient and residential treatment. The University of Texas at San Antonio will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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El Paso County Community Supervision and Corrections Department

Texas

El Paso County Community Supervisions and Corrections Department in El Paso, Texas, applied for grant funding under Subcategory 1a in the amount of $1,199,787. This project serves El Paso County with a population of approximately 839,238. The purpose of the project is to expand access to evidence-based treatment by piloting and evaluating telebehavioral health for probationers and expanding access to medication-assisted treatment. Priority considerations addressed in this application include providing services to Qualified Opportunity Zones, addressing communities that are facing persistent poverty, and serving a region that has been disproportionately impacted by substance abuse.

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Arlington County Government

Virginia

Arlington County Department of Human Services’ Behavioral Health Division (BHD) applied for grant funding under Category 1B in the amount of $899,815 over three years. This project will serve Arlington County (population 235,000) and is particularly focused on response in high-poverty regions of the county where opioid use and opioid overdoses remain prevalent. The project also works across traditional jurisdictional boundaries to provide wraparound services for individuals identified as high risk or otherwise involved in the Arlington criminal justice system. The purpose of this project is to improve access to and treatment in the detoxification program; provide early intervention to people arrested on substance use-related charges and identify alternatives to incarceration; improve recovery options by adding a reentry program to an established residential program; maintain collaboration between the police and BHD to address opioid overdoses and activity hotspots; assess and provide interventions for children and families impacted by substance use; and evaluate the use of evidence-based treatment and outcomes. The proposed addition of 1.0 FTE therapist and 1.0 FTE case manager will allow BHD to enhance services along the Sequential Intercept Model. The therapist will be focused on establishment, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based programming in a variety of treatment settings and will be the clinical lead for the creation of diversion service plans and “Plans of Safe Care” for substance-exposed infants. The case manager will serve as the lead clinical staff for co-response with police and fire services to the community, and will provide community outreach, education, and naloxone distribution. Both positions will expand the reach of MAT programming in the county and will address gaps identified through comprehensive community assessment. A key feature of the proposal is a collaboration with an academic partner, Dr. Taxman from George Mason University, to evaluate performance, including outcomes and outputs, along with the development of fidelity assessments to measure evidence-based practice adoption. The project expands upon existing partnership with the police and fire departments, Child Protective Services, the offices of the sheriff, the public defender, and the Commonwealth’s attorney.

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Augusta County

Virginia

The Commonwealth’s Attorney’s Office for the County of Augusta, Virginia, applied for grant funding in the amount of $600,000. This project serves Augusta County, a small, semi-rural county with the population of 74,701. The purpose of the project is to expand its currently existing LEAD program to serve the expanding number persons with substance use disorder. The grant will fund a new case management program, which will connect higher-risk, felony-level offenders with community resources prior to them being charged. The program will also institute a new transfer project, which will give medical professionals and first responders the ability to ensure continuity of care for clients presenting with SUD. The project includes partnerships between Augusta County Sherriff’s Department, Blue Ridge Court Services, Valley Community Services Board, Blue Ridge Criminal Justice Board, and the Institute for Reform and Solutions. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural designation for part of the County of Augusta in seven of its census tracts.

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Chesterfield County

Virginia

Chesterfield County Sheriff’s Office is applying for grant funding in the amount of $1,192,430. This project serves the metro Richmond area with a population of over 500,000 and is submitted under Subcategory 1a. The purpose of the project is to provide specialized pretrial supervision to individuals at high risk for overdose and expand reentry planning and medication-assisted treatment to inmates. The project includes partnerships between the Chesterfield County Sheriff’s Office, Chesterfield Community Corrections Services, Chesterfield Mental Health Supportive Services, and a local evaluator. Priority considerations addressed in this application include providing services to Qualified Opportunity Zones, addressing persistent poverty, and serving a region that has been disproportionately impacted by substance abuse.

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County of Page

Virginia

The Page County Sheriff’s Office proposes to develop the Page County Cognitive Mental Health and Substance Abuse Treatment Project that will provide cognitive behavioral treatment for individuals who are involved with the justice system as a result of their opioid use. The project includes a coordinator to manage the operations of a day reporting center where individuals can receive individual or group sessions in person or via teleconferencing. The project will fund equipment for the telehealth component and will serve the county of Page and the towns of Rileyville, Luray, Stanley, and Shenandoah. Project partners include Page County Sheriff’s Office, Page County Jail, Luray Police Department, Stanley Police Department, and the Shenandoah Police Department.

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Makah Indian Tribe of the Makah Indian Reservation

Washington

In the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Program application, the Makah Tribe is proposing to utilize funding under Category 1: Local or Tribal Applicants, Subcategory 1c. The applicant intends to utilize funds from this application to continue funding the two FTE positions from the previous application: the COSSAP case manager and one coordinator, who will implement the LEAD program, develop MAT protocols, and help further expand the Sisuk Houses. There are no priority considerations for this application.

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Seattle King County Department of Public Health

Washington

Seattle and King County Public Health is proposing to provide enhanced care coordination services focusing on treatment decision-making within the correctional setting and the linkage and retention of formerly incarcerated individuals into community-based opioid use disorder treatment programs. Transition support services for individuals who receive Medicated Assisted Treatment will be provided as well as increased identification of individuals with OUD, enhanced release planning from jail, and linage to a community provider for up to five visits following release from jail. Grant funds requested will provide: a half-time coordinator, two full-time substance use disorder specialists, a health program assistant and a lead evaluator, Dr. Hood, Seattle King County Public Health.

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County of Juneau

Wisconsin

The Juneau County Sheriff’s Office proposes a jail-based substance use disorder program in collaboration with the Juneau County Department of Human Services. It will include a coordinator to provide expanded case management services to include screening and assessment; a full-time jail-based therapist to develop treatment plans and provide individual and group therapy, and referral to a community-based MAT program. The Sheriff’s Office intends to contract with a local program evaluator to conduct yearly evaluations to assess the overall implementation and the effectiveness of the program in achieving its stated goals and objectives.

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Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians

Wisconsin

The Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Indians (a federally recognized Indian Tribe) applied under Category 1c for grant funding in the amount of $589,959. This project will serve the Ojibwe Indian membership of the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe (LCO) of rural northern Wisconsin. The population of the Tribe is 7,796, with thousands more familial descendants. The purpose of the project is to provide evidence-based opioid treatment that supports services to tribal individuals in need of transitional or recovery housing with a Bimaadiziwin tribal culture-based peer recovery support services, including medication-assisted treatment and recovery. The project will improve collaboration and partnerships between tribal and community-serving agencies in support of an EBT “wraparound” system of comprehensive Anishinaabe culture-based mental health treatment and recovery that uses the ASAM Criteria to determine the most appropriate level of treatment and care. This project includes important partnerships between the LCO Residential Treatment Center and tribal and county human services agencies, such as: LCO Comprehensive Community Services, LCO Tribal Court, LCO Bizhiki Wellness Center, Social Services Department, Vocational Rehabilitation Program, and the Minimaajisewin Home Program. OJP policy priority areas for Category 1 that are addressed by this project application from the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe applicant are: applications that address specific challenges that rural communities face, individuals who reside in high-poverty areas (the reservation), and individuals who offer enhancements to public safety in economically distressed communities.

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Milwaukee County Housing Division

Wisconsin

The Milwaukee Prostitution and Opioid Diversion Project (MPOD) within the Milwaukee County Housing Division will establish a public health and justice partnership to address the unique needs of women in street prostitution and sex trafficking who abuse illicit or prescription opioids (and other drugs) and frequently come into contact with the justice system for prostitution or drug-related arrests or as victims of sex trafficking. MPOD will enhance service capacity in the current Sisters Diversion Project, a municipal pre-arrest prostitution diversion program, building on the pre-existing partnership among the Milwaukee Police Department, the Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division, the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office, local treatment agencies, and the Medical College of Wisconsin; and enhance coordination and services for women in Milwaukee County’s Early Interventions Program (specifically, its pretrial diversion program). MPOD will engage the Medical College of Wisconsin as the research partner for this project.

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Waukesha County

Wisconsin

The Waukesha County Criminal Justice Collaborating Council will work with the District Attorney’s Office to develop a pre-charge diversion program for low-risk offenders who abuse illicit or prescription opioids and expand the use of deferred prosecution agreements for moderate-risk offenders who abuse illicit or prescription opioids. The University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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Winnebago County District Attorney

Wisconsin

The Winnebago County District Attorney will improve data infrastructure and develop diversion strategies for people with opioid use disorders using evidence-based components. BetaGov/Litmus at New York University (NYU) will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Wisconsin Department of Justice

Wisconsin

The Wisconsin Department of Justice (DOJ) will support the implementation of local law enforcement assisted diversion (LEAD) and medication-assisted treatment (MAT) programs in jails. Five pre-booking diversion sites using the LEAD model will be selected to provide diversion to treatment at the pre-arrest or post-arrest stages. Nine jail-based sites will be selected to provide non-narcotic, non-addictive injectable MAT to an inmate in the days immediately preceding re-entry to the community. The MAT program will include community-based care coordination for inmates exiting the county or tribal jail and rely on evidence-based, trauma-informed practices for substance use disorder treatment. This project will engage the Wisconsin DOJ's Bureau of Justice Information and Analysis as the research partner for this project.

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Logan County Commission

West Virginia

The Logan County Commission, in partnership with the Southwestern Regional Day Report Center in Logan, West Virginia, will implement the Fresh Start program, which will facilitate access to treatment services to overdose survivors. West Virginia has the highest drug overdose death rate in the nation. Overdoses attributed to prescription drug overdoses are especially prevalent in the southernmost counties of West Virginia, including Logan County. At the center of the program will be agricultural and artisan programming, which aims to reconnect clients with their communities. The program will offer community mentoring, interagency teamwork, life-based skills development sessions, craftsmanship, artisanship, and credit attainment through the local community college. Another key component of the program is the creation of the Logan County Health Department Satellite site, to provide increased access to basic health-care services. Marshall University will serve as the project’s research partner.

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West Virginia Division of Administrative Services, Justice and Community Services

West Virginia

The West Virginia Division of Justice and Community Services (DJCS) will address the opioid crisis in West Virginia by increasing the number of technology-assisted treatment services for individuals involved with the justice system because of an opioid use disorder in rural areas. The program plans to provide mental health services, addiction recovery services, and alternative sanctions or diversions. These services will be implemented through existing community corrections programs and future partnerships to provide risk and need assessments, group counseling, and individual counseling. The project will purchase and install the necessary hardware and software in 12 community corrections programs. The Office of Research and Strategic Planning, a unit within the DJCS, will provide for the research needs of the project.

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