Grantee Projects

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Native Village of Port Heiden

Alaska

The Meshik Soul Healing Project will provide screening for substance abuse and referrals to treatment and will incorporate a cultural camp in the Native Village of Port Heiden and provide for appropriate services within the context of the Aleut, Alaska, Native/American Indian culture. The project will serve the villages of Perryville, Pilot Point, Port Heiden, and Ugashik. The villages have tribal councils, which function as tribal governments and are rural communities.

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22nd Judicial Circuit District Attorney's Office

Alabama

The Office of the District Attorney in Alabama’s 22nd Judicial Circuit will concentrate on response and prevention. Response will include the formation of the opiate abuse prevention task force, which will be responsible for providing expedited responses for all opiate overdoses as well as for violent crimes involving opiates. The office will provide training for all local first responders on proper crime scene management and preservation as well as treating overdose victims and witnesses. Overdose response kits will be distributed to all police and fire departments in the county. Advertising campaigns will encourage those present during an overdose to call 9-1-1 without fear of arrest, provided they are not directly responsible for the overdose. The task force will host meetings with local doctors and pharmacists to develop and promote safe prescribing protocols. In the event that patients are found to be abusing prescriptions, the office will take the proper procedures to hold them accountable and to promote treatment through rehabilitation. The office will take all available steps to prosecute any doctors found to be illegally or unnecessarily prescribing opiates. Prevention efforts will be directed at high school students through part-time work-study peer helpers, who will be hired to maintain communication with students to warn them about the dangers of opioid use. The office will also partner with Operation Save Teens, a program that shows area teenagers the dangers of opiate abuse.

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Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration

Arkansas

The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration proposes to develop a statewide comprehensive opioid abuse plan that will include goals, objectives, and strategies addressing opioid abuse and misuse. The goals are to develop resources, recommend evidence-based practices, and create online tools that will aid Arkansas communities in reducing opioid abuse/misuse and related deaths and assist offenders with a history of opioid abuse. To meet the proposed objectives, the planning process will be facilitated by the planning consultant and consist of collaboration and partnerships from across state agencies and local entities. The required collaborative partner for this project is the Department of Human Services/State Drug Director, the state agency responsible for alcohol and substance abuse services. Other partnering agencies include the Department of Human Services/Office of the State Drug Director; representatives from the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area Program (HIDTA); the Administrative Office of the Courts; Arkansas Community Correction (ACC), Probation and Parole; Department of Human Services, Child Welfare; Governor’s Office–Senior Advisor for Child Welfare; Arkansas Sheriff’s Association; Arkansas Chief’s Association; Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA); Arkansas Foundation for Medical Care (AFMC); Arkansas Municipal League (an association of city/county governments); the City of El Dorado; and the City of Marianna. After the plan is finalized and approved, the state will move towards the implementation phase. The state anticipates providing up to 25 subawards to localities/communities. Representatives from these localities/communities will be trained, utilize developed resources, implement strategies identified in the comprehensive plan, and become designated opioid task forces.

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Arizona Criminal Justice Commission

Arizona

The Arizona Criminal Justice Commission (ACJC) will use grant funds to hire a criminal justice treatment coordinator and bring together representatives from partner agencies and community service agencies to create and implement the Arizona Criminal Justice and Treatment Improvement Project. Since the grant provided to ACJC was a statewide planning grant, the focus of this project period will be developing and submitting an implementation grant to the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) in 2019 that promotes strategies to identify and provide treatment recovery support services to high-frequency utilizers of multiple systems who have a history of opioid misuse and expanding diversion and alternatives to incarceration programs. Partner agencies include the Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System, the Arizona High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA), the Arizona Department of Health Services, the State Department of Corrections, the Department of Public Safety, the Attorney General’s Office, the Administrative Office of the Courts, county attorneys, county sheriffs, chiefs of police, and county and city administration. The Arizona COAP Project team submitted its implementation grant to BJA in June 2019 under category 2-C, requesting funds to implement new programs in six sites across Arizona and to enhance and evaluate existing programs.

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Hoopa Valley Tribe

California

The Hoopa Valley Tribe will deliver customized interventions through the criminal justice system of Humboldt County and the Hoopa Valley Tribal Court. Among this project's deliverables are a full community needs assessment, an opioid diversion work plan, the implementation of data tracking systems across multiple domains, and broadened awareness of best practices for both county and tribal partners. The proposed project will be one of the first cross-jurisdictional diversion programs in Indian Country specifically designed to meet the opioid epidemic.

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Ventura County

California

The Ventura County Health Care Agency–Ventura County Behavioral Health Department, the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office, the Ventura County Public Health Department, the Ventura County Emergency Medical Services Agency, and the Ventura County Ambulatory Care Department will convene the County Opioid Abuse Suppression Taskforce (COAST) to improve the quality, consistency, sharing, and integration of local and state prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) data to monitor community-level conditions/outcomes and target/coordinate resources to increase impact in response to the opioid abuse epidemic. Funds will also be used to complete, document, and disseminate an evaluation of state and local prescriber trends by scope of practice and to deploy the ESRI ArcGIS Opioid Epidemic Solution. EVALCORP Research and Consulting will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Boulder County

Colorado

Boulder County Community Justice Services will work with the project partners to develop diversion and policy-related programming across intercept points as alternatives to traditional prosecution for offenders with low criminogenic risk who are facing opioid-related charges, those with treatment needs who are residing in jail, or those reentering the community, with a focus across all interventions on those who are high system utilizers. The OMNI Institute will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection

Connecticut

The Connecticut Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP), in partnership with other state agencies, will merge the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) and the state forensic laboratory system with the Connecticut Prescription Monitoring and Reporting System (CPMRS) to allow prescribers and pharmacists to identify patients who have died and reduce inappropriate dispensing; create a new module to allow law enforcement users access to both death data and toxicology information within the CPMRS to assist in their investigations; and conduct educational campaigns to introduce these new features and the benefits that would expand the ability of prescribers, pharmacists, and law enforcement to avoid and deter controlled substance misuse or diversion.

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Executive Office of the Governor of Delaware – Criminal Justice Council

Delaware

The Delaware Criminal Justice Council, in partnership with the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, will implement the Delaware Smart Criminal Justice and Treatment Change Team to effectively integrate initiatives, processes, and programs into standard treatment policies and practices maximizing efforts. Grant funds will implement programs to effectively integrate initiatives, processes, and programs into standard treatment policies and practices maximizing efforts. Grant funds will be used to implement comprehensive policies and practices identified in the planning phase and outlined in the coordinated state criminal justice and treatment plan. Subgrants will be awarded that assist and provide financial support to units of local government and community services agencies to implement strategies that support treatment and recovery service engagement; increase the use of diversion and alternatives to incarceration; and reduce the incidence of overdose death. The geographic area is the entire state of Delaware.

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City of Miami

Florida

The Miami Police Department will implement a diversion program that follows the law enforcement-assisted diversion (LEAD) model. Officers who encounter a subject will have the authority to offer a 12-month treatment program as an alternative to arrest and incarceration. If a person agrees to participate, he or she must sign a legally binding treatment agreement. The Behavioral Science Research Institute will serve as the project’s research partner.

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Criminal Justice Coordinating Council

Georgia

The Savannah Police Department proposes to establish a pre-arrest diversion and behavioral response initiative by providing enhanced crisis intervention team training and offering substance abuse recovery treatment and behavioral health treatment. The applicant will provide data through Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP). David A. Bell, PhD, LLC, an independent evaluator, will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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DeKalb County Court Services

Illinois

The DeKalb County Opioid Dependency Diversion Program (ODDP) will increase immediate access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) services. The team, overseen by a full-time ODDP coordinator, will develop services that will include identifying persons with opioid abuse, providing MAT and recovery support services as part of a diversion program in an attempt to divert from harsher sentences, accessing MAT services for persons who have been charged but are awaiting trial, and assisting clients with some type of community supervision to access MAT. BetaGov/Litmus at New York University will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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Hamilton County Council on Alcohol and Other Drugs

Indiana

The Hamilton County, Indiana, Council on Alcohol and Other Drugs will implement an initiative known as the Community Opioid Prevention Effort (COPE). COPE will follow the Quick Response Team (QRT) diversion model, which will provide immediate intervention at on-scene overdoses, conduct visits to survivors of nonfatal overdoses, and provide recovery support and other community resources to individuals and their families. Treatment providers and recovery coaches will develop and implement strategies to identify and provide treatment and recovery support services. COPE will also encourage cross-system planning and collaboration among community officials, law enforcement, pre-trial services, the courts, probation, health-care providers, public health providers, emergency medical services, and substance abuse treatment providers.

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Kenton County Detention Center

Kentucky

The Kenton County Detention Center will reduce the prevalence of opioid abuse in Covington, Kentucky. In 2015, northern Kentucky lost nearly five times more residents to drug overdoses than to car accidents. This project proposes to address the issue by implementing the Kentucky Overdose Prevention and Education Project (KOPE), which has three main goals: to conduct an analysis of the severity of the opioid crisis; develop a multidisciplinary approach to address the needs of overdose survivors; and incentivize, propagate, and support pre-arrest diversion and naloxone distribution programs in the targeted region. This proposal will support naloxone distribution programs in the region. The Kenton County Detention Center will collaborate with local police departments and health-care and rehabilitation providers. Northern Kentucky University will serve as an action research partner.

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Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government

Kentucky

The Lexington–Fayette Urban County Government will create the Lexington Overdose Outreach Project (LOOP). LOOP will consist of a multidisciplinary response team of law enforcement, fire and emergency services, treatment providers, recovery advocates, and other community partners. The Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center at the University of Kentucky will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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University of Kentucky Research Foundation

Kentucky

The Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center (KIPRC), bona fide agent for the Kentucky Department for Public Health, intends to implement a project that will strengthen interagency as well as researcher-practitioner collaborations, expand data sharing, and improve decision making of regulatory and law enforcement agencies and public health officials in their efforts to reduce prescription drug misuse and diversion as well as illicit drug use. The goals of the project are to evaluate the impact of Kentucky Law SB32, which required the inclusion of drug conviction data in Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting (KASPER); develop and provide education for prescribers and dispensers on the content of conviction data within KASPER patient reports; evaluate changes in gabapentin prescribing and diversion since gabapentin became a Schedule V controlled substance in Kentucky in 2017; analyze existing and new data sets for identification of drug abuse; and hold quarterly action team meetings to review recent data. The project's research component will be performed by action researchers from KIPRC, the Institute for Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy (IPOP), and the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research (CDAR), University of Kentucky.

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East Bridgewater Police Department

Massachusetts

Plymouth County Outreach (PCO), a police and treatment outreach approach to high-risk individuals, will continue to develop its countywide, multifaceted approach involving law enforcement, hospital, recovery, and local treatment partnerships that conduct post-overdose home follow-up visits to overdose survivors who are not initially admitted to a hospital or treatment services. The local research partner, Kelley Research Associates, created a unique, real-time overdose tracking system that supports the daily overdose response program. The East Bridgewater Police Department will make data available through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Massachusetts Administrative Office of the Trial Court

Massachusetts

The Trial Court of Massachusetts, on behalf of six states (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont), will establish a New England Regional Judicial Opioid Initiative (RJOI). This project will support comprehensive cross-system planning and collaboration among officials who work in multiple justice and justice related settings while staying focused on the judiciary and judiciary stakeholders (e.g. law enforcement, pre-trial services, the courts, probation and parole, child welfare, reentry, prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs), and emergency medical services, as well as health-care providers, public health partners, and agencies that provide substance use disorder treatment and recovery support services). The New England RJOI will also develop and enhance public safety, behavioral health, and public health information-sharing partnerships that leverage key public health and public safety data sets and implement interventions based on this information. The project will have a researcher and is presently completing contract negotiations for these services.

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City of Detroit

Michigan

The Detroit Police Department’s Opioid Abuse Diversion Program will create and implement a law enforcement-led pre- and post-arrest diversion in Detroit using the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) model. The School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project. The applicant agreed to provide data through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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St. Louis County

Missouri

The Opioid Community of Practice (OCP) began in October 2017 and is coordinated by St. Louis County Department of Public Health. The OCP is a multijurisdictional learning collaborative composed of public health entities and action researchers that provides a designated space for strategic planning, knowledge sharing, protocol evaluation, peer review, and innovation. OCP members are engaged in a continuous process of learning to identify barriers, highlight successful interventions, and identify new opportunities for potential collaboration. Participation of local public health agencies ripples from anchoring jurisdictions from St. Louis County, St. Louis City, St. Charles County, Kansas City, Jackson County, Clay County, Columbia–Boone County, and Springfield–Greene County. The group aims to improve outreach on OCP initiatives to the growing number of jurisdictions (currently 72) participating in the St. Louis County Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) and beyond. The group also includes researchers from the Missouri Institute of Mental Health at the University of Missouri–St. Louis and leaders from local law enforcement, the Missouri Hospital Association, United Way of Greater St. Louis, the Behavioral Health Network of Greater St. Louis, and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. The goals and objectives for this project are: (1) collaborate to improve data identification, collection, and utilization of opioid data; (2) prioritize and enhance community-based interventions and system-level strategies using improved opioid data and collective action that address social determinants of health; and (3) leverage action researchers, local public health entities, and regional data collaborative groups to evaluate the collective impact of the learning community and the impact of resulting interventions on reducing opioid misuse. St. Charles County, Kansas City, Jackson County, Clay County, Columbia–Boone County, and Springfield–Greene County. The group aims to improve outreach on OCP initiatives to the growing number of jurisdictions (currently 72) participating in the St. Louis County Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) and beyond. The group also includes researchers from the Missouri Institute of Mental Health at the University of Missouri–St. Louis and leaders from local law enforcement, the Missouri Hospital Association, United Way of Greater St. Louis, the Behavioral Health Network of Greater St. Louis, and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. The goals and objectives for this project are: (1) collaborate to improve data identification, collection, and utilization of opioid data; (2) prioritize and enhance community-based interventions and system-level strategies using improved opioid data and collective action that address social determinants of health; and (3) leverage action researchers, local public health entities, and regional data collaborative groups to evaluate the collective impact of the learning community and the impact of resulting interventions on reducing opioid misuse.

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Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

North Carolina

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ Integrated Opioid Abuse Program will develop a task force composed of tribal decision makers who will create policies and keep agencies accountable to indicators of success. A multidisciplinary team will provide direct services to high-frequency drug users and their families. These two teams will work together to develop a plan to create a secured mental health/opioid abuse treatment center and secure transportation for participants becoming certified peer recovery support specialists.

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City of Manchester

New Hampshire

The Manchester Police Department will enhance the existing Adverse Childhood Experiences Response Team Enhancement (ACERT) Project. The ACERT response team includes a Manchester police officer to provide law enforcement, security, and safety; a crisis services advocate to provide support and explain available victim services; and a community health worker to prevent retraumatization. Plymouth State University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project. Training in trauma-informed services will also be provided to first responders. The applicant agreed to make data available through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Morris County Sheriff's Office

New Jersey

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office will use funds to maintain and expand its Hope One Mobile Outreach vehicle program, which is deployed twice a week to areas experiencing a high volume of opiate overdoses. This expansion will include the launch of a Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI), utlizing municipal and county law enforcement with the assistance of community partners. The research partner, Epiphany Community Services, will be provided with the data to track client progress and report progress so that any necessary program adjustments can be made.

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Pueblo of Pojoaque

New Mexico

The Pueblo of Pojoaque will create the Pueblo of Pojoaque Opioid Prevention and Intervention Project, a court-based, pre-prosecution diversion program. A project coordinator and an outreach worker/case manager will be hired. The State of New Mexico Sentencing Commission will serve as the evaluation partner for the proposed project.

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Reno Police Department

Nevada

The Reno Police Department, in partnership with the Washoe County Health Department and other community partners, will implement evidence-based practices in the field of tobacco prevention by launching a mass-reach health communication campaign with the goal of changing the social norms surrounding prescribed opioids. This program will also follow up with individuals/families who have experienced a suspected overdose and provide information regarding resources such as how to seek a substance abuse evaluation and/or counseling, medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and other treatment, and where to obtain naloxone. Finally, the program will launch a prescriber education campaign.

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Erie County

New York

Erie County, New York, will establish an opioid mortality review board to inform future public health practice and policy related to primary and secondary prevention of opioid addiction and mortality through action research that operationalizes insight gained from mortality reviews.

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City of Columbus–Public Safety, Division of Fire

Ohio

The Columbus Department of Public Safety’s Rapid Response Emergency Addiction and Crisis Team (RREACT) will hire a project manager, fund a case manager, and fund staff members at the Franklin County Family and Children First Council to provide wraparound service coordination and trauma counseling for children and families impacted by overdose. Grant funds will be used to establish standard protocols for case management for overdose survivors who do not immediately choose to enter treatment; incorporate connection to kinship supports and trauma counseling for children and family members impacted by overdose; implement standards case management protocols; and measure the impact of community-based RREACT services on repeat overdose, entry into treatment, and future engagement with the justice system. The Columbus Division of Fire (which operates the RREACT Program) will partner with an external researcher for project evaluation.

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Fairfield County

Ohio

Fairfield County, Ohio, will implement the Fairfield County Overdose Response Team (FORT). Strategies include deploying an Overdose Response Team to perform follow-up visits with persons who have had a nonfatal overdose; providing expedited access to treatment, including medication-assisted treatment (MAT), to persons who have had a nonfatal overdose; performing overdose fatality case reviews; connecting people who identify as having a substance use disorder with available treatment and recovery options outside of the criminal justice system; and tracking every overdose in real-time using the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP). Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Franklin County

Ohio

Between 2003 and 2015, Franklin County experienced a 343 percent increase in residents dying from drug-related overdoses. To combat what the DEA has referred to as “Ground Zero” of the opiate and carfentanil crisis, the government of Franklin County, Ohio, will implement the Diversion Alternative–Project Opioid (DA–PO) program, a comprehensive and multifaceted approach to reducing the impact of the opioid crisis. Expanding treatment and support services and reducing the number of overdoses and fatalities are the project’s main goals. In addition, the DA–PO program calls for planning and implementation of a Community Mayor's Drug Court, the launch of a robust harm-reduction campaign that will include hosting town hall meetings, distributing naloxone kits to families of overdose survivors, and distributing fentanyl test strips to those in active addiction. Mighty Crow Media will partner with Franklin County as the project’s researcher.

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Supreme Court of Ohio

Ohio

The Supreme Court of Ohio has been awarded funding for the eight-state regional project, to create the Appalachia/Midwest Regional Judicial Opioid Initiative (RJOI), which includes Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, North Carolina, Ohio, Tennessee, and West Virginia. This initiative facilitates the improvement of PDMP exchanges across state lines, establishes regional best practices, and coordinates and standardizes procedures that provide a more targeted, unified regional response to the opioid epidemic. The RJOI effort is led by the Leadership Committee (composed of each state’s Supreme Court chief justice and the state court administrator), which relies on the National Center for State Courts for aid and coordination. Indiana University’s Public Policy Institute is the action researcher for the project.

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Warren County

Ohio

The Warren County, Ohio, Commissioners Office, in partnership with the Department of Children Services, Warren County Sheriff’s Office, Mental Health and Recovery Services of Warren and Clinton County, and the Addiction Policy Forum, propose to pilot the Child Assessment and Response Evaluation program, a 24/7 rapid response intervention program for children who are present at the scene of an overdose of a parent or loved one. The Urban Institute will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Muscogee (Creek) Nation

Oklahoma

The Muscogee (Creek) Nation (MCN), the fourth-largest federally recognized tribe in the United States, is proposing the MCN COAP and Treatment Project. Project MCN will pursue three goals. First, MCN will develop an internal referral process to identify tribal citizens suffering from opioid abuse who need additional services and support or citizens at higher risk as a result of exposure. Second, MCN will create an internal database of patient health information to inform and evaluate patient needs for treatment and prevention opportunities. Third, MCN will increase the number of providers certified and licensed for medication-assisted treatment and new telebehavioral health options at a primary care facility. Use of these expanded options will be driven by data analysis and recommendations from a research partner.

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Beaver County

Pennsylvania

In Beaver County, Pennsylvania, accidental overdose deaths increased by 240 percent from 2014 to 2016, and more than 600 naloxone reversals were reported in 2016. Beaver County is also the first county in the region to report an overdose death from carfentanil, an analog of the synthetic opioid analgesic fentanyl, 10,000 times more potent than morphine. In response, Beaver County will implement a program to analyze the underlying causes of opioid misuse and to create a data exchange system for use by the Criminal Justice Advisory Board, the Sequential Intercept Model Committee, and the Drug Coalition to influence policy. Additional goals include evaluating outreach, prevention, and treatment efforts and to work to expand prescription drug monitoring. Townsend Associates LLC will serve as the project’s research partner.

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Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) will fund projects for counties that work with the Technical Assistance Center at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy’s Program Evaluation and Research Unit to implement evidence-based programs to reduce overdose deaths.

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Rhode Island State Police

Rhode Island

The Rhode Island State Police will implement the Heroin-Opioid Prevention Effort (HOPE) Initiative, the nation’s first statewide law enforcement-led opioid overdose outreach program, modeled after the Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI). The HOPE Initiative engages law enforcement personnel in a proactive outreach strategy to combat the opioid overdose epidemic by bringing together substance-use professionals and members of law enforcement with the mission of reaching out to those who are at risk of overdosing and encouraging them to be assessed and treated. The project will support the HOPE Initiative by enhancing the ongoing efforts of state and local government to address the opioid overdose epidemic, including gathering real-time law enforcement data on opioid overdoses to identify individuals with opioid use disorder. In addition, the project will support a program involving law enforcement and case management to provide outreach to individuals with opioid use disorder. Outreach efforts will include victims and child welfare services. Data gathered through the HOPE Initiative will be shared with the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP). Kelley Research Associates will serve as the project evaluator.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services will develop the Sullivan County Overdose Response Team (SCORT) in Sullivan County. Grant funds will be used to support a coordinator and peer navigator(s), and a case manager will provide support services to both individuals who have overdosed and victims as well as administrative grant support. The case manager will also coordinate with the Tennessee Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (TADEC) and the Sullivan County District Attorney’s Office through the Sullivan County Family Justice Center. The SCORT coordinator will be responsible for exporting and uploading all relevant data into the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP) data collection tool. An independent evaluator will serve as the project evaluator.

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Utah Department of Health

Utah

The Utah Department of Health Violence and Injury Prevention Program proposes to develop a data information sharing system with public safety and local health departments. The key indicators will include mortality, morbidity, and prescription of behavior-related data using data from death certificates, medical examiner records, syndromic surveillance, prescription drug monitoring data (known as the Controlled Substance Database), emergency department records, and poison control data. These efforts will assist in developing an information sharing system that is timely to inform prevention efforts.

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Mason County

Washington

From 2009 to 2014, deaths related to heroin have doubled in Mason County, Washington; the county had the fourth-highest rate of death (2011–2013) attributed to opiates, with a rate of more than 14.1 per 100,000 compared with the state rate of 8.6 per 100,000. This project includes a public education campaign, a prescription drug take-back component, and naloxone distribution as well as a comprehensive look at Mason County’s treatment and recovery system. Project goals include reducing the number of opioid-related deaths, increasing the number of opioid users who own naloxone take-home kits, developing a local recovery and treatment services network. and improving public awareness about the dangers of opioids and about local treatment and recovery support services.

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Kenosha County

Wisconsin

The Kenosha County Opioid Overdose Reduction Project was created in response to the high nonfatal overdose and opioid-related death rates in the community. The project utilizes state-certified peer support specialists to link overdose survivors and their families with treatment and support services. Local hospitals and the EMS community are partners in the effort to establish contact shortly after the initial overdose. The Kenosha County Opioid Overdose Task Force was formed in 2017 to promote awareness and education regarding opioid-related substance use disorders, overdose prevention, and harm reduction and to facilitate partnerships among member agencies - including EMS, hospitals, treatment providers, the recovery community, county government, the district attorney's office, probation and parole, the health department, the medical examiner's office, and law enforcement.

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Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin

Wisconsin

The Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin will mitigate the impact of opioid abuse on crime victims within the Menominee tribal jurisdiction by hiring two full-time crisis response case managers at Tribal Social Services to work with first responders, the Clinic of Behavioral Health, and the Child Protection Team when children are present at the scene of an overdose or are impacted by familial substance abuse. The grant funds will also be used to support a program coordinator who will assist in implementing the program, a clinical therapist, and a family preservation worker.

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Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin

Wisconsin

The Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin will develop a Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI) model of law enforcement diversion to reduce opioid abuse and the number of overdose fatalities. Grant funds will be used to support a program coordinator, who will assist in implementing the program; a clinical therapist; and three peer support specialists. The applicant agreed to make data available through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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West Allis Health Department

Wisconsin

The West Allis Health Department will implement the Cardiff Model, an enhanced violence surveillance system and intervention that involves information sharing and violence prevention among law enforcement, public health, and the medical field. The model requires (1) the collection, linking, and mapping of interpersonal violence information from emergency departments, police departments, and other relevant areas (e.g., emergency medical services [EMS]); and (2) the convening of a multidisciplinary stakeholder consortium to discuss and utilize timely information to implement data-informed violence-prevention activities. The Cardiff Model has not been evaluated regarding its impact in the United States and requires evaluation in the proposed health-care, population, and environmental contexts. Further, by incorporating and discussing opioid-related data sets (e.g., the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program [ODMAP], the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program [PDMP]) alongside violence data sets, this model may have utility for addressing the intersection of violence and opioid misuse. The Medical College of Wisconsin and its Comprehensive Injury Center will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Wisconsin Department of Justice

Wisconsin

The Wisconsin Department of Justice, in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, will develop a comprehensive state plan that will assist the state and localities in engaging and retaining individuals in the justice system in diversion, treatment, and recovery services. This plan will identify training and technical assistance programs for localities aimed at improving treatment engagement and client outcomes; supporting the tracking, compiling, coordinating, and dissemination of statewide and local data; and expanding the collaborative efforts between state and local agencies. Funding is also provided to implement the plan once it is approved.

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