Grantee Projects

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Alaska Department of Health and Social Services

Alaska

The Alaska Department of Health and Social Services will institute an Alaska Public Safety and Public Health Drug Overdose Death Review that will assess the social, behavioral, and health system determinants of overdose deaths, with the goal of identifying opportunities for prevention and development of effective public policies.

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22nd Judicial Circuit District Attorney's Office

Alabama

The Office of the District Attorney in Alabama’s 22nd Judicial Circuit will concentrate on response and prevention. Response will include the formation of the opiate abuse prevention task force, which will be responsible for providing expedited responses for all opiate overdoses as well as for violent crimes involving opiates. The office will provide training for all local first responders on proper crime scene management and preservation as well as treating overdose victims and witnesses. Overdose response kits will be distributed to all police and fire departments in the county. Advertising campaigns will encourage those present during an overdose to call 9-1-1 without fear of arrest, provided they are not directly responsible for the overdose. The task force will host meetings with local doctors and pharmacists to develop and promote safe prescribing protocols. In the event that patients are found to be abusing prescriptions, the office will take the proper procedures to hold them accountable and to promote treatment through rehabilitation. The office will take all available steps to prosecute any doctors found to be illegally or unnecessarily prescribing opiates. Prevention efforts will be directed at high school students through part-time work-study peer helpers, who will be hired to maintain communication with students to warn them about the dangers of opioid use. The office will also partner with Operation Save Teens, a program that shows area teenagers the dangers of opiate abuse.

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Alabama Department of Mental Health

Alabama

Alabama’s Department of Mental Health, in partnership with the Alabama Bureau of Justice Assistance, a division of the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, proposes to conduct a statewide comprehensive needs assessment and plan for the design and implementation of criminal justice diversion and treatment services in select counties in Alabama. The proposed project is called ROAD to Recovery (Reducing Opioid Addiction through Diversion).

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Alabama Department of Mental Health

Alabama

Alabama's Department of Mental Health (ADMH), working in partnership with the Alabama Department of Economic Affairs and multiple state agencies as well as community organizations, will develop a Centralized Data Repository (CDR) to hold data and distribute results to identified agencies. Combining the information from an arrest to treatment to death to hospital care to community impact will offer a data solution that allows analysis informing targeted strategies to reduce prescription drug abuse and opioid addiction. This combined data-driven initiative will aid in reducing the number of people diverting, misusing, and abusing prescription drugs and opioids in Alabama in a way that siloed data as it exists now will never be able to accomplish.

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Alabama Department of Mental Health

Alabama

Alabama’s Department of Mental Health, in partnership with the Alabama Bureau of Justice Assistance, a division of the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs, will pilot an evidence-based model or models of diversion from incarceration for opioid-addicted individuals interacting with the criminal justice system and to study the impact/outcomes of such interventions, spreading successful intervention statewide at the completion of the project period, to reduce incarceration, recidivism, morbidity, and mortality for adults with opioid use disorders (OUDs) who are cycling through the criminal justice system.

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Alabama Department of Public Health

Alabama

The Alabama Department of Public Health will develop updated training for prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) users, produce public service announcements to educate the public, integrate the PDMP into electronic health records and pharmacy dispensing software, and analyze the PDMP data.

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Jefferson County Commission

Alabama

Jefferson County Commission applied for Category 1a urban area funding in the amount of $1,189,215. The Jefferson County Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Program (COSSAP) will extend peer recovery services to include expanded pretrial supervision, as well as provide evidence-based treatment, including medication-assisted treatment (MAT), to individuals at high risk for overdose. This project serves a population of more than 500,000 in Jefferson County, Alabama. The project includes partnerships between the University of Alabama Department of Psychiatry — Substance Abuse Division, Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, and a local evaluator. Priority considerations addressed in this application include providing services to Qualified Opportunity Zones, addressing persistent poverty, and serving a region that has been disproportionately impacted by substance abuse.

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University of Alabama

Alabama

The Institute of Business Analytics (IBA) is the research hub for the Culverhouse College of Business at the University of Alabama. IBA will develop the Unified Nexus for Leveraging Opioid Crime Knowledge (UNLOCK) system, which will provide decision makers with the information they need to allocate resources and policies in a timely manner. The UNLOCK system will serve as a data communications pipeline whereby information from the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences, Medicaid, and other future partners can flow back up the chain to decision makers in a de-identified manner. The data will consist of summarized toxicology information, evidence test results, and coroner death report information and other georeferenced data that will assist decision makers. The UNLOCK system will be deployed to field officers, law enforcement administrators, prosecutors, community affiliates, public health providers, and researchers to provide them with complete analytics capability.

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Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration

Arkansas

The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration is applying for a Category 2 statewide area grant in the amount of $6,000,000. The Arkansas COSSAP Project will address the opioid epidemic strategically and continue providing support to areas that have been disproportionally impacted by the abuse of illicit opioids, stimulants, and other substances, as indicated by a high rate of treatment admissions for substances other than alcohol; high rates of overdose-related deaths; and lack of accessibility to treatment and recovery services. The primary focuses of the proposed projects are comprehensive, real-time, regional information collection, analysis, and dissemination; the development of peer recovery services and treatment alternatives to incarceration; and continued Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-based Program (COAP) overdose investigations involving peer recovery services and the implementation of strategies identified in the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Strategic Plan. This project serves specific counties where high rates of opioid deaths have been identified in COAP Category 2; however, the specific subrecipients for the proposed projects have not been selected. The project includes partnerships between the Department of Finance and Administration Office of Intergovernmental Services (DFA-IGS), Department Human Services, Office of State Drug Director, and the Single State Authority, in addition to a new partnership between DFA-IGS and the Arkansas Coroners’ Association. Priority considerations addressed in this application include providing services to rural communities and the fact that the individuals (populations) intended to benefit from the project reside in high-poverty and/or persistent-poverty counties.

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Arkansas Department of Health

Arkansas

The Arkansas Department of Health will create a data repository that links prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) data, emergency department/hospitalization data, and death certificates using semantic integration; develop a risk prediction tool for identifying individuals at risk for opioid overdose using the linked data sets, creating a graphical user interface for the linked databases and a risk-prediction tool; and implement a statewide campaign using the new tools created by this application to increase awareness of opioid overdose risk in Arkansas.

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Arkansas Department of Health

Arkansas

The Arkansas Department of Health seeks to convene an action group, the Prescription Drug Overdose (PDO) Advisory Council, to encourage and support cross-system planning and collaboration to reduce the incidence of morbidity and mortality related to opioid overdose. The approach will include integrating prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) data with all identified data sets, developing composite tables that combine indicators across data sources, providing training and education to opioid prescribers, assessing the impact of specific policy changes to the PDMP, and creating the Opioid Misuse Action Group to provide feedback on the data sets. The Arkansas Department of Health will also implement the Dose of Reality educational campaign to combat opioid abuse.

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Arkansas Division of Aging, Adult Behavioral Health Services

Arkansas

The Arkansas Office of the State Drug Director, together with Arkansas Foundation for Medical Care, proposes to create a statewide data sharing infrastructure with a single data repository/database; an interactive Web portal accessible by law enforcement, criminal justice, and health-care stakeholders; and syndromic drug overdose surveillance via dashboards and heat maps. The objectives of the project are to promote cross-system planning and coordination of opioid abuse prevention and treatment interventions through information-sharing partnerships with key stakeholders; increase the timeliness, comprehensiveness, and reporting of fatal and nonfatal opioid overdose data; disseminate surveillance findings to key stakeholders and policymakers to inform prevention and response efforts; and monitor use of the data sharing system and implement ongoing quality controls.

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Hoopa Valley Tribe

California

The Hoopa Valley Tribe will deliver customized interventions through the criminal justice system of Humboldt County and the Hoopa Valley Tribal Court. Among this project's deliverables are a full community needs assessment, an opioid diversion work plan, the implementation of data tracking systems across multiple domains, and broadened awareness of best practices for both county and tribal partners. The proposed project will be one of the first cross-jurisdictional diversion programs in Indian Country specifically designed to meet the opioid epidemic.

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Regents of the University of California (Davis)

California

The University of California, Davis (UC Davis) will work with the California Department of Justice and other partners to perform a rigorous evaluation of California’s new law mandating use of its prescription drug monitoring program. The evaluation will focus on effects of mandated PDMP use on prescribing patterns and health outcomes, including potential unintended consequences. UC Davis will work with the Northern California High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) to establish a foundational relationship between public health and law enforcement agencies. In particular, UC Davis will focus on exploring new data sources from law enforcement agencies to share with public health agencies about opioid supply and overdose. The goal is to develop protocols to predict opioid overdose and share information about supply disruptions with emergency departments, first responders, and other key agencies. UC Davis will also explore protocols for communicating directly with local emergency services directors.

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Ventura County

California

The Ventura County Health Care Agency–Ventura County Behavioral Health Department, the Ventura County Sheriff’s Office, the Ventura County Public Health Department, the Ventura County Emergency Medical Services Agency, and the Ventura County Ambulatory Care Department will convene the County Opioid Abuse Suppression Taskforce (COAST) to improve the quality, consistency, sharing, and integration of local and state prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) data to monitor community-level conditions/outcomes and target/coordinate resources to increase impact in response to the opioid abuse epidemic. Funds will also be used to complete, document, and disseminate an evaluation of state and local prescriber trends by scope of practice and to deploy the ESRI ArcGIS Opioid Epidemic Solution. EVALCORP Research and Consulting will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Boulder County

Colorado

Boulder County Community Justice Services will work with the project partners to develop diversion and policy-related programming across intercept points as alternatives to traditional prosecution for offenders with low criminogenic risk who are facing opioid-related charges, those with treatment needs who are residing in jail, or those reentering the community, with a focus across all interventions on those who are high system utilizers. The OMNI Institute will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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City of Alamosa

Colorado

The City of Alamosa applied for Category 1c tribal/rural area grant funding in the amount of $599,997. The Angel Project will provide a non-arrest, self-referral pathway to connect addicted individuals to intensive case management and harm-reduction resources using the evidence- based Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI) model. The City of Alamosa is creating a system of care that will allow individuals to receive appropriate levels of service and treatment to address root challenges rather than utilizing a criminal justice system clearly not equipped to address substance use disorder effectively. The Angel Project will provide a third pathway into intensive case management, service coordination, and connection to harm- reduction resources. This project serves approximately 50,000 residents in the 12th Judicial District. The project includes partnerships between the City of Alamosa, Center for Restorative Programs, and the 12th Judicial District Office of the District Attorney. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the disproportionate impact of opioids and other substances on the region, the specific challenges faced by rural communities, and the high poverty area served by the project.

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City of Longmont

Colorado

The Longmont Department of Public Safety, located in Boulder County, Colorado, will expand its Crisis Outreach Response and Engagement (CORE) program. Grant funds will be used to support a paramedic, two peer case managers, a project coordinator, and treatment for individuals who are struggling with substance use or co-occurring disorders. The University of Colorado, Boulder, will serve as the research partner on the proposed project.

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Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

Colorado

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) will expand Colorado’s existing innovative, multidisciplinary approach to reduce opioid abuse and overdose by linking prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) data to key public health and public safety data sets to create a de-identified analytic data file that can be used to identify hot spots throughout the state. Specifically, CDPHE and its partners will achieve the following goals during the three-year project period: (1) enhance public safety/behavioral health/public health treatment partnerships to leverage key data sets to better understand Colorado’s opioid epidemic; (2) increase data-driven responses to Colorado’s opioid epidemic; and (3) assess the impact of the implementation of Colorado Senate Bill 18-022 on PDMP utilization and patient outcomes. The University of Colorado School of Medicine will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection

Connecticut

The Connecticut Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP), in partnership with other state agencies, will merge the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (OCME) and the state forensic laboratory system with the Connecticut Prescription Monitoring and Reporting System (CPMRS) to allow prescribers and pharmacists to identify patients who have died and reduce inappropriate dispensing; create a new module to allow law enforcement users access to both death data and toxicology information within the CPMRS to assist in their investigations; and conduct educational campaigns to introduce these new features and the benefits that would expand the ability of prescribers, pharmacists, and law enforcement to avoid and deter controlled substance misuse or diversion.

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Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection

Connecticut

The State of Connecticut Department of Consumer Protection, Drug Control Division is upgrading the Connecticut Prescription Monitoring and Reporting System (CPMRS) to the NarxCare Platform, enhancing the administrator portal features to allow prescription monitoring program (PMP) staff members to better assist all user groups, identify and correct problems, and address requests for research data. The division is adding a Mandatory Use Compliance module to produce PMP administrator reports of providers and review histories, and reports for providers of their missed reviews. It is conducting three educational campaigns to introduce the NarxCare platform, new features, and benefits to prescribers, pharmacists, and law enforcement.

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Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection

Connecticut

The Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection will use the grant funds to implement and populate a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) software Uniform Crime Reporting repository with geographic information system (GIS) capabilities. The goal is for federal, state, and local law enforcement to use this system to direct available investigative and patrol resources more efficiently and effectively.

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District of Columbia Office of the Chief Medical Examiner

District of Columbia

The District of Columbia Office of the Chief Medical Examiner (DC-OCME) has applied and been granted a Category 1a rural area grant in the amount of $1,200,000. DC-OCME Toxicology Opioid and Illicit Drug Surveillance (TOIDS) will reduce the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances on individuals and communities, including a reduction in the number of overdose fatalities, as well as mitigate the impacts on crime victims by supporting comprehensive, collaborative initiatives like conducting forensic toxicology laboratory testing of illicit drug misuse and novel testing for opioids. In addition, it will be analyzing comprehensive, real-time, regional information collection, analysis, and dissemination; and streamlining the forensic toxicology lab testing methodology through Lean Sigma Six (LSS) training of staff and LSS reform of the lab. Products include a sustainable LSS lab and staff, a comprehensive reference of new opioids, and free online resources on DC-OCME’s web page. DC-OCME will disseminate best practices with community partner and advocates. This project serves the District of Columbia with a population of 702,455. The project includes partnerships between the Network for Victim Recovery of D.C., D.C. Forensic Nurse Examiners, D.C. Metropolitan Police Department, D.C. Department of Transportation, D.C. Office of Victim Services and Justice Grants, and D.C. Department of Health. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the poverty priority, the persistent poverty counties priority, and Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Executive Office of the Governor of Delaware

Delaware

The Executive Office of the Governor of Delaware - Criminal Justice Council will implement new opioid-intervention programs in five geographically diverse localities: Dover (Kent County), Smyrna (Kent County), Millsboro (Sussex County), Seaford/Laurel (Sussex County), and Georgetown/Lewes/Milton (Sussex County). The project goals are to: (1) increase the number of law enforcement diversion programs; (2) reduce overdose deaths; (3) increase transitional housing availability; and (4) increase services for youth impacted by opioid overdoses. One initiative will involve establishing pre-arrest or post-arrest law enforcement diversion programs (using the Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative [PAARI] model) for individuals who commit low level, nonviolent, drug-related offenses by utilizing community-based substance abuse and behavioral health services. The project will also include identifying cases where youth are impacted by an overdose and providing evidence-based responses, providing transitional or post recovery housing for individuals, and improving the collection/integration of data by purchasing a statewide case management system for law enforcement and Delaware’s Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health.

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New Castle County

Delaware

The New Castle County Division of Police is proposing to expand Hero Help, a law enforcement led diversion by creating a team (substance abuse clinician, nurse, police officer, case manager, victim advocate) embedded in the patrol division, to respond immediately to 9-1-1 calls for service. Grant funds support a full-time project coordinator, nurse, child victim advocate (respond to overdose where children are impacted) and a licensed clinician. Additionally, to improve analytic capacity, develop a data collection tool to capture near real-time fatal and nonfatal overdoses. University of Delaware, Center for Drug and Health Studies, and Daniel O’Connell will serve as the research partner.

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Florida Department of Health

Florida

The Florida Department of Health will enhance the Florida Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) system, known as E-FORCSE (Electronic-Florida Online Reporting of Controlled Substance Evaluation Program), by employing an epidemiologist to provide data analysis to inform and guide health-care practitioners and policymakers and expanding existing outreach and education. E-FORCSE will also fund integration of PDMP information into clinical workflow by providing mini-grants to small physician practices and independent pharmacies.

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Pinellas County (DBA Board of County Commissioners)

Florida

Pinellas County is developing a Strategic Information Partnership (SIP) to (1) support real-time/timely data collection from key stakeholders to better articulate the current state of the problem; (2) improve communication for targeted outreach, enforcement, and education; (3) support cross-system planning and data evaluation to better inform policymakers on targeted interventions; and (4) leverage scarce resources and avoid duplication of efforts.

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Pinellas County dba Board of County Commissioners

Florida

The Pinellas County CARE Team Expansion will enhance current overdose response by increasing connections and engagements in community substance use treatment services, providing peer support to overdose survivors and families, conducting overdose fatality reviews to identify trends and potential gaps in the system of care, and increasing first responder and community access to naloxone. This project serves Pinellas County, Florida, with an estimated population of 970,532. The project includes partnerships between Pinellas County Human Services and Pinellas County Safety and Emergency Services.

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Cobb County Board of Commissioners

Georgia

The Cobb District Attorney’s Office will create an Opioid Fatality Review Project and provide wraparound services to families that have lost a loved one to an overdose; establish a case manager to provide wraparound services to opioid offenders who do not qualify for one of Cobb’s existing Accountability Courts; and establish an investigator to initiate deep-dive investigations into opioid dealers and distributors. Applied Research Services, Inc. will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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Fulton County

Georgia

The County of Fulton applied for Category 1a urban grant funding in the amount of $1,200,000. The Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Program will expand Fulton County’s comprehensive efforts to identify, respond to, treat, and support those impacted by substance use disorders and reduce impact on the criminal justice system. The Fulton County Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities (DBHDD) and its partners will expand pre-arrest diversion, case management, and training for law enforcement personnel to the city of Atlanta and two other jurisdictions using the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion model; provide recovery support services including transitional or recovery housing through Fulton DBHDD and its local partners; and offer evidence-based treatment including medication-assisted treatment through partner Grady Hospital. This project serves the city of Atlanta (population 498,044). The project includes partnerships between the Atlanta Fulton Pre-Arrest Diversion Initiative, Grady Hospital, Mary Hall Freedom House, Atlanta Recovery Center, Trinity Community Ministries, Sober Living of America, There’s Another Option, Highsmith Collins, Atlanta Police Department, and the Fulton County Offices of the District Attorney, Public Defender, and Solicitor General. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones, high-poverty areas, and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers, facilities, and emergency medical services. Dr. Kevin Baldwin from Applied Research Services serves as the lead evaluator for the proposed project.

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Georgia Bureau of Investigation

Georgia

The Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) will use the grant funds to update its in-house case management system, Justice Information Management Network (JIMNet). The goal is to increase technology to identify and impact crime trends in Georgia.

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Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council

Georgia

The Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council applied for Category 2 statewide area grant funding in the amount of $2,289,701. The Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program will (1) establish a multi-locality naloxone initiative to include continued training for law enforcement personnel and provide funding to assist with the replenishment of the opioid reversal drug; (2) establish and implement a pre-arrest/post-booking diversion program for youth and adults who have a moderate to high risk of substance abuse within Athens-Clarke County; (3) provide K-12 youth in Athens-Clarke County with increased access to education and treatment; and (4) provide a comprehensive, real-time, information collection database for the City of Savannah to expand the pre-arrest diversion program, which is funded through the FY 2018 Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site Program (COAP). This project serves serve 23 of Georgia’s 159 counties. The project includes partnerships between Athens-Clarke County Unified Government and City of Savannah.

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Iowa Governor's Office of Drug Control Policy

Iowa

The Iowa Governor’s Office of Drug Control Policy will facilitate the collation and dissemination of data from multiple sectors into a statewide opioid dashboard, the Iowa Opioid Data Exchange (IODE). The Division of Intelligence and Fusion Center will be the lead implementation agency for this project. Key partners include state agencies and other organizations with primary responsibility for administration of data, which are central to the success of this project. These partners include the Governor’s Office of Drug Control Policy, Department of Public Health, Iowa Board of Pharmacy (Prescription Drug Monitoring Program [PDMP]), Iowa Office of State Medical Examiner, Division of Intelligence/State Fusion Center (in coordination with the Midwest High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas [HIDTA]), State Crime Laboratory, Iowa Emergency Medical Services Bureau, Iowa Poison Control Center, and Iowa Division of Criminal and Juvenile Justice Planning. The multidisciplinary dashboard will provide a holistic and timely opioid-related surveillance report from a variety of public health and public safety data sets. IODE aims to improve the connectivity, cohesiveness, timeliness, and overall effectiveness of opioid-related surveillance data collection, analysis, and sharing to enhance the health and public safety response in rural communities and larger cities across Iowa.

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Idaho Department of Health and Welfare

Idaho

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW) will build a sustainable data infrastructure to ensure timely collection, analysis, and dissemination of opioid data. In addition, an action researcher will establish a suspected drug-induced death mortality review team. The data will be shared with Idaho’s strategic planning workgroup and other stakeholders. To address vulnerable populations, IDHW will work with the Idaho Office of Drug Policy to distribute naloxone in communities across Idaho. To educate prescribers in rural Idaho on substance abuse treatment and safe prescribing, IDHW will work with the University of Idaho to extend its Project ECHO program, an evidence-based, technology-enabled collaborative learning model that builds a clinician’s knowledge and ability to treat complex conditions. To evaluate Idaho’s efforts in educating prescribers on safe prescribing and prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) utilization, IDHW will contract with a third-party evaluator.

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Boone County

Illinois

Boone County applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $599,000. The Boone County Support Outreach Recovery Team will to fill the identified need for a community law enforcement officer to work with the individuals who have been arrested and fill the identified need for an addiction counselor to work with the county’s jailed population. The second purpose of this program is to fill the identified need for an addiction counselor who will work as a recovery coach with Boone County’s jailed population. This individual will deliver services such as moral reconation therapy and substance abuse counseling. This project serves Boone County, Illinois (population 53,606). The project includes partnerships between the Boone County Health Department, the multidisciplinary team, the Rosecrance, and the Belvidere Police Department.

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City of Chicago

Illinois

The Chicago Police Department (CPD) will expand their current law enforcement diversion initiative and allow the treatment provider staff to provide assessment and referral services to three additional CPD Districts. This project will be focused on the West Side of Chicago, with a population of 487,687. Funds will be used to hire treatment staff that will be able to administer the deflection program, provide training to officers in the additional districts on the program, institute quarterly HealthStat (fatal and non-fatal overdose review), and evaluation. CPD has also engaged an evaluation research partner, the University of Chicago Crime Lab. They will collect data, perform analysis, and contribute to the program and research design. Additionally, CPD has committed to integrating overdose detection mapping application program into their data collection.

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Cook County Health

Illinois

Through this funding, Cook County Health will convene the Cook County Community Recovery Learning and Action Network to (1) address recovery housing capacity, including harm-reduction models of recovery housing and coordination for persons experiencing chronic homelessness; (2) begin development of a real-time, regional recovery housing information system, including collection, analysis, and dissemination across partners, and (3) implement and evaluate an intervention to promote referral for medications for addiction treatment, recovery support, and recovery housing for individuals with substance use disorders, with a special focus on individuals under supervision of the Cook County Adult Probation Department. This project serves Cook County, Illinois, which has 5.2 million residents. The project includes partnerships with transitional and recovery housing providers, substance use treatment providers, criminal justice partners, state agencies, community-based partners, and public health organizations. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high-poverty areas, and this project will offer enhancements to public safety in economically distressed communities (Qualified Opportunity Zones).

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Cook County Medical Examiner's Office

Illinois

Cook County will hire an epidemiologist at the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office (CCMEO) to assist in fulfilling data requests from partner agencies and performing drug-related statistical analysis pertaining to opioid-related deaths; install progressive updates in the CCMEO’s digital case management system to include additional data that may be pertinent to the collaborating agencies; and quantitate naloxone concentrations in postmortem samples if the drug is present in a decedent’s system. Partnering agencies will include the Cook County Department of Public Health, the Chicago Department of Public Health, the Cook County Health and Hospitals System, and the Chicago High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area.

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DuPage County Health Department

Illinois

The DuPage County Health Department (DCHD) will deliver medication-assisted treatment (MAT) at the DuPage County Jail, implement a data management team to unify disparate data sources related to opioid use in the county; and implement a cross-sector Overdose Fatality Review Team based on the RxStat model. The Illinois Criminal Justice Information Authority will serve as the research partner for this project.

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Illinois Department of Public Health

Illinois

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) intends to use the grant funds to bring together multidisciplinary partners in a workgroup, which will then build a centralized repository of cross-sector data, provide enhanced data analyses with data dashboard outputs based on stakeholder needs, and evaluate best practices for data dissemination into the communities. This project will leverage key data sets to create a holistic view of the Illinois environment to facilitate targeted interventions and will identify best practices for information sharing. The workgroup will report data and seek input from the Illinois Opioid Crisis Response Advisory Council, which is led by the Illinois Department of Human Services. The opioid-related data available for this project include IDPH data on overdose deaths, hospitalizations, emergency department visits, emergency transport naloxone administration, neonatal abstinence syndrome, and viral hepatitis statewide case reporting data.

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Lake County dba Lake County Health Department and CHC

Illinois

The County of Lake, doing business as Lake County Health Department and Community Health Center, applied for a Category 1a urban area grant in the amount of $1,100,024. The Lake County A Way Out 2.0 Program will focus on increasing access to treatment, increasing treatment success rates, reducing overdoses, and providing community outreach. This project will aim to have 90 percent of consumers with opioid use admitted to a treatment provider within 24 hours of initial contact and 70 percent of consumers successfully complete their first treatment episode. Also, 90 percent of consumers will receive information regarding MAT and naloxone and given an appropriate referral. Finally, 90 percent of consumers will meet with their peer recovery support specialist weekly, and one community outreach session will be conducted by the project coordinator per month. This project serves Lake County, Illinois, with a population of 703,462. The project includes partnerships between Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Sciences. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment episodes for heroin and other opioids, high rates of overdose deaths, and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities.

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Hamilton County Council on Alcohol and Other Drugs

Indiana

The Hamilton County, Indiana, Council on Alcohol and Other Drugs will implement an initiative known as the Community Opioid Prevention Effort (COPE). COPE will follow the Quick Response Team (QRT) diversion model, which will provide immediate intervention at on-scene overdoses, conduct visits to survivors of nonfatal overdoses, and provide recovery support and other community resources to individuals and their families. Treatment providers and recovery coaches will develop and implement strategies to identify and provide treatment and recovery support services. COPE will also encourage cross-system planning and collaboration among community officials, law enforcement, pre-trial services, the courts, probation, health-care providers, public health providers, emergency medical services, and substance abuse treatment providers.

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Indiana State Department of Health

Indiana

The Indiana State Department of Health (ISDH) will increase the timeliness and robustness of fatal drug overdose reporting. This will be accomplished by funding comprehensive toxicology testing for suspected cases of drug overdose deaths across Indiana. ISDH will also obtain more comprehensive demographic data of persons who have suffered fatal drug overdoses. By providing mini-grants to overcome barriers associated with using ISDH’s coroner case management system, coroners will be encouraged to utilize this system and thus provide more comprehensive demographic data on fatal overdoses. ISDH will link toxicology results with existing demographic information regarding the deceased persons and disperse aggregated data to the opioid data working group. ISDH will also develop an innovative pilot project that will involve the enhanced toxicology testing of leftover clinical samples (blood and/or urine) from patients who are treated in a hospital following a suspected drug overdose event. Such testing will provide more robust public health information including situational awareness of illicit and licit drug use that results in drug overdose events. It will also allow local and state officials to track drugs circulating in Indiana as well as identify novel substances in its communities. Finally, ISDH will utilize the data collected by the toxicology testing from both fatal and nonfatal drug overdoses to inform targeted interventions. Indiana University–Purdue University will serve as the researcher for the proposed project.

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Floyd County Fiscal Court

Kentucky

Floyd County Fiscal Court applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The Floyd County Family Services Program will (1) increase access to evidence-based treatment and recovery support services for 150 adults and/or families involved with the criminal justice system, (2) improve the health and recovery of 150 adults and/or families impacted by substance use disorders or co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse (including opioid use disorders), (3) reduce the number of overdose fatalities, and (4) improve the safety of children affected by parental drug overdose. This will be accomplished by addressing four allowable uses of funds, including (1) embedding social services (therapist) with law enforcement to rapidly respond to drug overdoses where children are affected; 2) provide naloxone for law enforcement to address opioid overdoses; 3) provide evidence-based treatment, recovery and peer recovery support services for the targeted population; and 4) coordinate with courts to prioritize and expedite treatment and recovery services to individuals at high risk for overdose and family issues stemming from SUD. This project serves Floyd County, Kentucky, with a population of 36,926. The project includes partnerships between the Mountain Comprehensive Care Center as the region’s Community Mental Health Center, Healthcare for the Homeless provider and Rape Crisis Center, Floyd County Family Court, Floyd County District Court, Floyd County Sherriff’s Office, Kentucky State Police, Appalachian Research and Defense Fund of Kentucky, Big Sandy Health Care, and Big Sandy Area Community Action Agency. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a rural community that faces a persistent-poverty and has a Qualified Opportunity Zone and areas with high rates of overdose.

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Kenton County Detention Center

Kentucky

The Kenton County Detention Center will reduce the prevalence of opioid abuse in Covington, Kentucky. In 2015, northern Kentucky lost nearly five times more residents to drug overdoses than to car accidents. This project proposes to address the issue by implementing the Kentucky Overdose Prevention and Education Project (KOPE), which has three main goals: to conduct an analysis of the severity of the opioid crisis; develop a multidisciplinary approach to address the needs of overdose survivors; and incentivize, propagate, and support pre-arrest diversion and naloxone distribution programs in the targeted region. This proposal will support naloxone distribution programs in the region. The Kenton County Detention Center will collaborate with local police departments and health-care and rehabilitation providers. Northern Kentucky University will serve as an action research partner.

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Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services

Kentucky

The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services will implement several enhancements to Kentucky’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP), KASPER. Funding will be used to implement a KASPER Direct Messaging system component to support communications and alerts among KASPER users; analyze and develop algorithms and techniques to increase the effectiveness of interstate data-sharing systems; and increase utilization of KASPER data for studies and research focusing on reducing controlled substance abuse and overdose risk factors.

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Purchase District Health Department

Kentucky

The Purchase District Health Department applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Purchase District Health Department program will implement a coordinated response to illicit opioids, psychostimulants, and counterfeit prescription drugs in Purchase. Four types of activities will be implemented: (1) provide naloxone for law enforcement and other first responders; (2) establish law enforcement and other first responder diversion programs; (3) conduct comprehensive, real-time, regional information collection, analysis, and dissemination; and (4) provide recovery support services, including recovery housing and peer recovery support services. This project serves eight counties totaling 196,563 people in western Kentucky. The project includes partnerships between law enforcement, first responders, and public health agencies who are active members of the Purchase Area Health Connections Opioid Task Force.

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University of Kentucky Research Foundation

Kentucky

The University of Kentucky Research Foundation, on behalf of the Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center (KIPRC), a bona fide agent for the Kentucky Department for Public Health (DPH), will (1) develop an algorithm-based mechanism to identify high-volume, high-risk opioid prescribing specialty groups within a health-care system to provide actionable information to health-care leadership to initiate targeted education; (2) develop an algorithm to identify inpatients whose specific principal diagnoses increase the likelihood that they will receive opioid prescriptions upon discharge and during follow-up care; and (3) develop diagnosis-specific patient education materials to facilitate a health-care system intervention for inpatients with these diagnoses. The results will be disseminated by developing reports, peer-reviewed manuscripts, and a repository of developed and tested patient- and prescriber-oriented educational materials to facilitate replication in other health-care systems and settings.

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University of Kentucky Research Foundation

Kentucky

The Kentucky Injury Prevention and Research Center (KIPRC), bona fide agent for the Kentucky Department for Public Health, intends to implement a project that will strengthen interagency as well as researcher-practitioner collaborations, expand data sharing, and improve decision making of regulatory and law enforcement agencies and public health officials in their efforts to reduce prescription drug misuse and diversion as well as illicit drug use. The goals of the project are to evaluate the impact of Kentucky Law SB32, which required the inclusion of drug conviction data in Kentucky All Schedule Prescription Electronic Reporting (KASPER); develop and provide education for prescribers and dispensers on the content of conviction data within KASPER patient reports; evaluate changes in gabapentin prescribing and diversion since gabapentin became a Schedule V controlled substance in Kentucky in 2017; analyze existing and new data sets for identification of drug abuse; and hold quarterly action team meetings to review recent data. The project's research component will be performed by action researchers from KIPRC, the Institute for Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy (IPOP), and the Center on Drug and Alcohol Research (CDAR), University of Kentucky.

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Louisiana Department of Health OPH Bureau of Health Informatics

Louisiana

The Louisiana Office of Behavioral Health is partnering with the Louisiana Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Criminal Justice to expand the Louisiana Opioid Surveillance System to include nonhealth data sources, which will be built by third-party contractor GCR, Inc. The goals are to enhance surveillance of the opioid abuse continuum from pre- and post-legislative impacts and relationships between parolees, etc., to support data-driven methods for cross-system planning and collaboration, and to engage a stakeholder group to develop best practices for data sharing efforts. A multidisciplinary action group will be formed to develop targeted interventions in select areas. Brandeis University will assist in the evaluation of longitudinal data related to the PMP.

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St. Tammany Parish Government

Louisiana

St. Tammany Parish will develop an information system to analyze and track the opioid client population across justice system and health intercepts in order to reduce cases of overdose and increase treatment and recovery service access. Key partners for this project include the 22nd Judicial District Court, the Safe Haven Advisory Board, St. Tammany Parish Hospital, the St. Tammany Parish Sheriff’s Office and Jail, and the District Attorney’s Office.

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St. Tammany Parish Government

Louisiana

The St. Tammany Parish Government aims to reduce the incidence of opioid overdoses and increase community access to care for substance abuse and behavioral health needs in Mandeville, Louisiana. The project will plan and implement a cross-system collaboration to address opioid use and promote jail diversion, treatment, and recovery. A program coordinator will create a unified data entry system to track data on opioid users when they enter hospitals, the criminal justice system, or recovery services in order to track their progress. The grantee will analyze data metrics to identify high-frequency users for enhanced programmatic targeting.

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City of Holyoke

Massachusetts

The Holyoke Police Department will use funds primarily for salaries that support a project coordinator, a narcotics intervention officer, a recovery coach, and a mental health supervisor. Through the Project Recovery and Engagement of Addicts and Chronic users of Heroin (REACH) Project, the Holyoke Police Department will address the significant opiate drug problem in Holyoke, Massachusetts. Project goals are to decrease the number of overdose victims, decrease the number of narcotics crimes, and increase the support systems for people addicted to opioids in Holyoke.

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City of Holyoke Police

Massachusetts

The Holyoke Police Department will implement Project Heroin Addiction Recovery Team Support (HARTS), designed to address the significant opiate drug problem in Holyoke, Massachusetts. The Holyoke Police Department will partner with the recovery coach to meet with all survivors of an opioid overdose, either in the community or at the emergency department. The University of Massachusetts, Amherst, will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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City of Holyoke Police Department

Massachusetts

The City of Holyoke Police Department (HPD) applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $597,650. Project ERASE (Expansion of Recovery from Addiction to Substances Efforts) will implement a multicomponent intervention program designed to (1) support individuals with opioid, stimulant, and other illicit substance issues with interventions to reduce addictions and associated mental health needs, (2) reduce overdoses and overdose deaths through prevention and intervention strategies, and (3) reduce substance-related crime in Holyoke. This project serves Behavioral Health Network and Gandara, the Holyoke Police Department, Hampden County Sheriff, Holyoke Probation, and research partners. The project includes partnerships between the House of Corrections to provide detox treatment options and develop a law enforcement liaison between HPD, the courts, and probation personnel. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high-poverty area and enhanced public safety in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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City of Lowell

Massachusetts

The Lowell Police Department is proposing to enhance and expand the Community Opioid-Outreach Program team (Lowell Police, Fire, Health, Trinity EMS, Lowell House) by: adding a youth services coordinator to focus on the needs of children affected by the opioid epidemic, two outreach specialists to expand service to the homeless community by serving as a liaison between agencies to improve communication and connect their various resources, and conduct pro-active outreach to any individuals with substance use disorder before an overdose. Grant funds will support a coordinator, crime analyst, full-time clinical recovery specialist and youth services coordinator, outreach recovery specialist and research team. University of Massachusetts Lowell will serve as the research team comprised of researchers from Center for Community Research & Engagement, School of Criminology and Justice Studies, and Community Health and Sustainability.

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City of Newburyport

Massachusetts

Newburyport Police Department (NPD) in Massachusetts, one of the founding departments of the Essex County Outreach Program, proposes to expand the outreach program to encompass all of Essex County. The Essex County Outreach Program is a series of stigma-free entry points to treatment on demand. The program supports nonarrest or early diversion program models that reach people before they enter the criminal justice system. The program supports multiple law enforcement entry points to treatment, including self-referrals to the stations. Cross-sector collaboration and partnerships are key to the program’s success which is supported by clinicians, social workers, recovery coaches, and trained volunteers.

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City of Northampton

Massachusetts

The City of Northampton applied for Category 1a urban area grant funding in the amount of $1,194,203. The City of Northampton Public Health/Public Safety Post-Overdose Outreach Program will reduce opioid overdose deaths and enhance public safety through the development, implementation, and expansion of interventions focused on the following allowable uses: law enforcement and other first responder diversion programs; comprehensive, real-time, regional information collection, analysis, and dissemination; and naloxone for law enforcement and other first responders. The first aim of this project is to expand DART — a countywide, nationally recognized public safety/public health post-overdose, high-risk substance use disorder, and family, community, and bereavement support program. This project serves a population of 28,726 in Northampton, Massachusetts. The project includes partnerships between South County Action EMS and Northampton Recovery Center. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Commonwealth of Massachusetts dba Middlesex Sheriff's Office

Massachusetts

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts, dba Middlesex Sheriff’s Office, applied for a Category 1a urban area grant in the amount of $1,152,729. The Involving Families in Treatment of Inmates with Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) Project will reduce opioid overdose deaths and improve treatment outcomes for inmates with opioid use disorder by providing naloxone to family members and involving them in treatment. Through an enhancement of the Medication-Assisted Treatment and Directed Opioid Recovery (MATADOR) Program — which provides naltrexone, buprenorphine, methadone, and case management services — the proposed project activities include: (1) development and implementation of naloxone trainings and naloxone distribution for family members of inmates with OUD; (2) provision of a comprehensive family services program for inmates with substance use disorders, including outreach to engage families in the project, educational programs for families on substance use disorder, family counseling, and support groups, and (3) an evaluation of the project’s impact in improving treatment outcomes and reducing the risk of overdose deaths. This project serves Middlesex County, located in northeastern Massachusetts. Middlesex County, the most populous county in New England, has 1.6 million residents. The project includes partnership with Brandeis University. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin or other opioids and high rates of overdose deaths.

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Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Sheriff's Department Hampden

Massachusetts

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts Sheriff’s Department Hampden applied for a Category 1b suburban area grant in the amount of $900,000. Hampden County Sheriff’s Department’s All Inclusive Support Service Program will reduce opioid-related overdoses and related fatalities. The program will take a multipronged approach to (1) enhance a database in Hampden County that will allow for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of comprehensive, real-time overdose information, and (2) implement a law enforcement, first responder-driven multidisciplinary overdose prevention, response, and diversion referral model known as the Rapid Response and Connection Program. This project serves Hampden County, Massachusetts, which has a population of 470,406. The project includes partnerships between the Hampden County Sheriff’s Department, Office of the District Attorney, Baystate Medical Center, Trinity Health Mercy Medical Center, local law enforcement entities, and other established community partners. Priority considerations addressed in project include the disproportionate impact from substance use on a rural, high-poverty census tract and public safety impact in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Franklin County Sheriff's Department

Massachusetts

The Franklin County Sheriff’s Department applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The Community Opportunity, Network, Navigation, Exploration, and Connection Team (CONNECT) will provide real-time assistance to individuals who survived, witnessed, or are at risk of an opioid overdose (e.g., family, family drug court participants, children, and community members). Team members will make in-person follow-up visits within 72 hours to individuals who survived or witnessed an opioid overdose, including affected children, to assess health, behavioral, and social needs. In addition, team members will connect individuals to community-based behavioral health, treatment, and recovery support services, while ensuring that opioid overdose survivors and witnesses navigate care across the criminal justice, human services, and educational systems. The program will expand Naloxone availability and appropriate use by first responders and law enforcement personnel, focusing on Naloxone deserts, and establish a system that offers real-time data collection, analysis, and dissemination of key data points to reduce opioid-related deaths. This project serves 87,130 residents in 30 communities spanning two rural counties in Western Massachusetts. The project includes partnerships between research scientists Pamela Kelley and Dr. Sean Varano and other community stakeholders representing law enforcement, the peer recovery community, harm reduction, courts, housing, and other basic human needs sectors.

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Massachusetts Administrative Office of the Trial Court

Massachusetts

The Trial Court of Massachusetts, on behalf of six states (Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont), will establish a New England Regional Judicial Opioid Initiative (RJOI). This project will support comprehensive cross-system planning and collaboration among officials who work in multiple justice and justice related settings while staying focused on the judiciary and judiciary stakeholders (e.g. law enforcement, pre-trial services, the courts, probation and parole, child welfare, reentry, prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs), and emergency medical services, as well as health-care providers, public health partners, and agencies that provide substance use disorder treatment and recovery support services). The New England RJOI will also develop and enhance public safety, behavioral health, and public health information-sharing partnerships that leverage key public health and public safety data sets and implement interventions based on this information. The project will have a researcher and is presently completing contract negotiations for these services.

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Town of East Bridgewater

Massachusetts

The Town of East Bridgewater applied for Category 1a urban area grant funding in the amount of $1,200,000. Plymouth County Outreach (PCO) will enhance the current PCO model in three ways: (1) creating a reentry support system for those returning from the Plymouth County House of Corrections with identified substance use disorders; (2) developing hotspot-targeted outreach to areas experiencing disproportionately high overdose rates; (3) expanding the harm-reduction toolkit distributed during post-overdose home visits to include items related to opioids and stimulants, including naloxone. This project serves Plymouth County, which has a population of 521,202. The project includes partnerships between 27 municipal police departments in Plymouth County, as well as the Bridgewater State University Police Department, Plymouth County District Attorney and Sheriff’s offices, as well as all local hospitals and treatment facilities. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high rate of overdose deaths in a persistent poverty area.

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Maryland Department of Health

Maryland

The Maryland Department of Health will develop a multidisciplinary data-governing framework and will partner with the Chesapeake Regional Information System for our Patients (CRISP) for data linking and for the establishment of a data warehouse. The data-governing framework will inform the design of a data warehouse to more efficiently utilize state resources while enabling secure access to drug-involved data. The data-governing framework and warehouse infrastructure will work in concert to produce key, data-driven, actionable recommendations guiding the state’s opioid response and enhance public safety, public health, and behavioral health partnerships and program evaluations.

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St. Mary's County Health Department

Maryland

St. Mary’s County Health Department in Maryland will work with other community agencies to expand the data that are used to support the Opioid Intervention Team. The utilization of Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP), Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP), and first responder data will be increased. In addition, the agency will increase the multidisciplinary engagements with community organizations and neighboring jurisdictions and increase recovery support services and educational opportunities for prescribers and patients.

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Cumberland County

Maine

The County of Cumberland applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $899,824. The Bridges for ME: Person-Centered Recovery and Reentry Project will focus on the development of an advisory council with at least five community partners and memorandums of understanding with five diverse treatment providers and annual screenings of 1,200 people for SUD/OUD conditions, while offering of 600 people resource referrals and naloxone. The project will also provide an annual provision of group support and reintegration planning to 200 people in jail, as well as intensive reentry services for 150 individuals receiving community service, including MAT and peer navigator services for 60 days. This project serves Cumberland County, population 281,674. The project includes partnerships between Cumberland County Jail, Maine Pretrial Services, Co-occurring Collaborative Serving Maine, Amistad, SMART, Maine Department of Corrections Probation, Portland Police Department, MAT providers Catholic Charities Maine, Spurwink Adult Behavioral Health Services, Maine Behavioral Healthcare IMAT, Northern Light Portland Internal Medicine, and Discovery House. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Cumberland County as a region disproportionately impacted by substance abuse.

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City of Detroit

Michigan

The Detroit Police Department’s Opioid Abuse Diversion Program will create and implement a law enforcement-led pre- and post-arrest diversion in Detroit using the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) model. The School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project. The applicant agreed to provide data through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Clare County

Michigan

The Clare County, Michigan, Prosecuting Attorney’s Office will establish a task force to focus on drug-related problems, to include the opioid epidemic. Representatives from all five of the law enforcement agencies that service Clare County, medical personnel, substance abuse counselors, pharmacists, a representative from probation and parole, and any other professionals who are identified during the implementation will comprise the task force. Federal agencies will also be invited to participate in the task force to participate in investigations that might be more effectively prosecuted at the federal level. The assistant prosecutor in charge of the program will coordinate with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District.

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Michigan Department of State Police

Michigan

The Michigan State Police, in partnership with the University of Michigan, will develop and pilot Community Overdose Assessment Teams (COATs) in up to three counties. The purpose of a COAT will be to review each overdose to identify causes and incidences of opioid overdose deaths within the selected sites, identify risk factors and gaps in the systems, develop recommendations to agencies of each local COAT to prevent future deaths, and provide recommendations to the state on how to address the epidemic, such as changes to laws or regulations.

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City of Duluth

Minnesota

The City of Duluth applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $899,055. The City of Duluth FY 2020 COSSAP Lake Superior Diversion and Substance Use Response Team Project will improve community outreach to overdose events by expanding outreach efforts to those with amphetamine-related substance use disorders and those who experience amphetamine-related overdoses. The program will reduce barriers between outreach contact and treatment, and maintain or expand current opioid response functions. This project serves St. Louis, Carlton, and Lake counties in Minnesota, as well as the city of Superior in Wisconsin. This region has a population of approximately 289,727 people. The project includes partnerships between St. Louis County Public Health and Human Services, St. Louis County Drug Court, and the Center for Alcohol and Drug Treatment. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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City of Saint Paul

Minnesota

The City of St. Paul applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $412,125. The Recovery Access Program (RAP) will include embedded social workers provided by People Incorporated to respond to drug overdoses where children are affected. A police officer will be assigned to RAP to assist the proposed investigator with the Naloxone Plus Model and Drug Surveillance Program. The St. Paul Police Department (SPPD) proposes to use these funds to include an investigator to act as a liaison between the police, treatment facilities, and community resources, as well as to serve as an advocate for drug courts or other measures in place of incarceration when appropriate. Funds will also be used to hire an internal SPPD data analyst to collect and manage program performance and evaluation data for the purposes of program improvement and program sustainability beyond grant funding. This project serves the city of St. Paul’s population of about 310,000 individuals. The project includes partnerships with the University of Wisconsin-Madison Population Health Institute. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity zones and high-poverty area.

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Minnesota Board of Pharmacy

Minnesota

The Minnesota Board of Pharmacy will move to the new prescription monitoring program (PMP) AWARxE platform with the inclusion of the deployment of NarxCare analytics, visualizations, and clinical intervention tools. To educate users about the database and the updated functionalities to ensure continued, accurate use of the system, a Quick Tips Guide—which was an appreciated educational tool in the past—will be created and distributed. Finally, the PMP will expand the system’s report-generation capabilities as used by the PMP administrator and the PMP pharmacist consultant to analyze and identify trends and provide requested data to stakeholders.

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Minnesota Department of Public Safety—Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

Minnesota

The Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension will create a drug monitoring initiative within the Minnesota Fusion Center. Key partners include local, state, federal, and tribal public safety and public health agencies, including the Minnesota Prescription Monitoring Program (MNPMP), Minnesota Department of Health, Department of Human Services, and Minnesota Poison Control.

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Minnesota Department of Public Safety—Bureau of Criminal Apprehension

Minnesota

The Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS) will support the “Timely Treatment, Strengthened Service, and Effective Evaluation for Overdose Prevention: Linkage to Care Across Minnesota” project to achieve the following objectives in eight sites: • Reduce opioid misuse and opioid overdose death by supporting local efforts to implement effective opioid overdose prevention projects. • Support local efforts to implement treatment and recovery support linkage activities serving individuals vulnerable for drug overdose. • Support implementation of local multidisciplinary intervention models to bring together stakeholders with different perspectives and different information to identify drug overdose prevention strategies. • Enhance access to naloxone among people who use drugs to decrease overdose deaths. • Enhance successful local multidisciplinary overdose prevention activities to decrease overdose deaths. • Evaluate the extent to which additional funding to eight opioid overdose prevention projects, referred to as “Tackling Opioid Use With Networks (TOWN)”, impact the incidence of overdose in communities. • Create a TOWN Manual in collaboration with the communities to support the expansion and sustainability of the TOWN model. The eight sites will implement three evidence-based activities: (1) peer recovery specialists in emergency departments; (2) treatment linkage by emergency medical services; and (3) overdose fatality review teams. The project will also enhance six Minnesota Department of Public Safety-funded syringe services programs by providing each site with naloxone to distribute to participants who use opioids. Dr. Catherine Diamond from the Minnesota Department of Health will lead the project evaluation.

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City of St. Louis

Missouri

The purpose of this project in St. Louis, Missouri, is to develop an information sharing ecosystem in order to create a repository for storing and managing anonymized, case-level data from across the enterprise to allow authorized personnel to access aggregated data through specially designed dashboards and analytics tools for tactical and strategic decision making. We will develop the technical and governance infrastructure to securely pass information between criminal justice and public health agencies in a timely, efficient, and accurate manner that conforms to national justice information sharing standards and industry best practices. The goal is to use the summary data to monitor progress on diverting the target population to develop sustainable, community-based prevention initiatives to combat opioid misuse and promote population health. Summary data from an array of data contributors will assist the City to ensure that the practices and policies that are implemented meet the needs of the target population.

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St. Louis County

Missouri

The Opioid Community of Practice (OCP) began in October 2017 and is coordinated by St. Louis County Department of Public Health. The OCP is a multijurisdictional learning collaborative composed of public health entities and action researchers that provides a designated space for strategic planning, knowledge sharing, protocol evaluation, peer review, and innovation. OCP members are engaged in a continuous process of learning to identify barriers, highlight successful interventions, and identify new opportunities for potential collaboration. Participation of local public health agencies ripples from anchoring jurisdictions from St. Louis County, St. Louis City, St. Charles County, Kansas City, Jackson County, Clay County, Columbia–Boone County, and Springfield–Greene County. The group aims to improve outreach on OCP initiatives to the growing number of jurisdictions (currently 72) participating in the St. Louis County Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) and beyond. The group also includes researchers from the Missouri Institute of Mental Health at the University of Missouri–St. Louis and leaders from local law enforcement, the Missouri Hospital Association, United Way of Greater St. Louis, the Behavioral Health Network of Greater St. Louis, and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. The goals and objectives for this project are: (1) collaborate to improve data identification, collection, and utilization of opioid data; (2) prioritize and enhance community-based interventions and system-level strategies using improved opioid data and collective action that address social determinants of health; and (3) leverage action researchers, local public health entities, and regional data collaborative groups to evaluate the collective impact of the learning community and the impact of resulting interventions on reducing opioid misuse. St. Charles County, Kansas City, Jackson County, Clay County, Columbia–Boone County, and Springfield–Greene County. The group aims to improve outreach on OCP initiatives to the growing number of jurisdictions (currently 72) participating in the St. Louis County Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) and beyond. The group also includes researchers from the Missouri Institute of Mental Health at the University of Missouri–St. Louis and leaders from local law enforcement, the Missouri Hospital Association, United Way of Greater St. Louis, the Behavioral Health Network of Greater St. Louis, and the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services. The goals and objectives for this project are: (1) collaborate to improve data identification, collection, and utilization of opioid data; (2) prioritize and enhance community-based interventions and system-level strategies using improved opioid data and collective action that address social determinants of health; and (3) leverage action researchers, local public health entities, and regional data collaborative groups to evaluate the collective impact of the learning community and the impact of resulting interventions on reducing opioid misuse.

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Lamar County Board of Supervisors

Mississippi

The Lamar County Board of Supervisors applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $599,981. The Lamar County LEAD Program will develop a trauma-informed, comprehensive, community-based response to divert individuals experiencing opioid or stimulant misuse/abuse from the criminal justice system to treatment. The objectives are to (1) divert 100 individuals with SUD from the criminal justice system to treatment and case management service providers, and (2) provide harm-reduction case management services to 150 individuals with SUD. A total of 250 individuals will be served over the project period. This project serves Lamar County, Mississippi, which has a population of 63,300. The project includes partnerships between Pine Belt Mental Healthcare Resources’ Grant and Research Department. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the lack of accessibility to treatment providers and facilities and emergency medical services, and rural challenges.

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Mississippi State Department of Health

Mississippi

The Mississippi State Department of Health will establish a state opioid and heroin data center to serve as an information resource for Mississippi. A comprehensive analysis of multiple data sources produced from this center will be utilized by the community, health-care providers, and other stakeholders to reduce the number of inappropriate opioid prescriptions and decrease the number of opioid fatalities in Mississippi. The objectives are to leverage key data sets to create a holistic view of the environment; inform Mississippi prescribers, policymakers, law enforcement, other stakeholders, and the public about the impact of prescription drug and heroin abuse for development of data-driven, evidence-based interventions; and use data to examine state and local-level policies for conformance with best practices and facilitation of positive interventions.

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Mississippi State Department of Health

Mississippi

The Mississippi State Department of Health will improve data quality for ongoing monitoring of the impact of opioid abuse in the state by (1) incorporating Syndromic Surveillance clinical data; (2) integrating emergency medical services (EMS) data with Syndromic Surveillance so that providers may view opioid overdose events; (3) enhancing EMS data quality so as to report opioid/drug overdose events; and (4) enhancing law enforcement data quality.

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City of Billings

Montana

The City of Billings applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Billings Peer Support Diversion Program (Billings PSDP) will develop a peer support-driven prebooking diversion program that provides support for individuals at high risk of overdose or chronic substance abuse. The program will use trained and certified peer support specialists, working independently and embedded with law enforcement to engage in street outreach with the chronically homeless through mobile behavioral health crisis response. The primary objective of the project is to use evidence-based strategies to divert high-risk individuals from incarceration into treatment and social support services. The project will also overcome local barriers related to length of treatment for methamphetamine recovery and limited recovery housing options in the community. This project serves individuals who have been arrested and chronically homeless individuals with opioid or stimulant use disorders in all of Yellowstone County, with a focus on downtown Billings, where this population is concentrated. The project includes partnerships among the City of Billings, Billings Police Department, Downtown Billings Association, and Rimrock, Montana’s largest mental health and substance abuse treatment provider. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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Buncombe County Health and Human Services

North Carolina

Buncombe County Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) proposes to connect individuals at risk of overdose with substance use treatment and peer support; provide transitional or recovery housing for individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) leaving the jails or the emergency department; develop programs to address the opioid epidemic in rural areas; develop and implement a comprehensive plan to reduce the risk of overdose death and enhance treatment and recovery service engagement among the pretrial and post-trial populations leaving jails; and support the timely collection and integration of data to provide an understanding of drug trends, support program evaluation, inform clinical decision-making, identify at-risk individuals or populations, and support investigations. Buncombe County DHHS, the Sheriff’s Office, and Emergency Medical Services will implement the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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City of Jacksonville

North Carolina

The city of Jacksonville proposes to implement peer navigators to provide case management to individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD); a law enforcement-assisted diversion program (LEAD); a Quick Response Team; continuum of care for children and families of individuals with OUD, including a psychologist in the schools; and establish an overdose fatality review board. Doctors Christina Lanier and Kristen DeVall from the University of North Carolina Wilmington will evaluate the project.

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Cumberland County Health Department

North Carolina

Cumberland County will expand post-overdose outreach to the entire community, provide linkage to care opportunities for persons experiencing a non-fatal overdose, creating an opioid fatality review, and enhance diversion programs by removing barriers to transitional housing.

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Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

North Carolina

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ Integrated Opioid Abuse Program will develop a task force composed of tribal decision makers who will create policies and keep agencies accountable to indicators of success. A multidisciplinary team will provide direct services to high-frequency drug users and their families. These two teams will work together to develop a plan to create a secured mental health/opioid abuse treatment center and secure transportation for participants becoming certified peer recovery support specialists.

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Henderson County/Henderson County Health Department

North Carolina

The Henderson County Health Department, through the County of Henderson, applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The funds will be used to expand access to recovery support services. The program seeks to provide peer-delivered services with a focus on rehabilitation and recovery, utilizing North Carolina certified peer support specialists and care coordinators. Services provided by the certified peers include psychosocial rehabilitation, habilitation, family support and training, short-term crisis intervention, and empowerment. This project serves a suburban area or medium-sized county with a population between 100,000 and 500,000. The project includes partnerships between Henderson County’s Behavioral Health Summit, Free Clinix, and Hope RX.

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Lenoir County

North Carolina

The County of Lenoir applied for Category 1b grant funding for the amount of $288,713. The purpose of the project is to improve capacity of the district’s Family Accountability and Recovery Court (FARC) to serve families involved in the family court system due to substance dependence. Project objectives include providing more seamless and comprehensive treatment, as well as recovery services to parents with substance use disorders through increased staff capacity, enhanced training and professional development, and expanding treatment and complementary services. The project also aims at addressing systemic barriers faced by parents with substance use disorders through family transitional housing and expanded transportation assistance, as well as improving FARC performance through evaluation and performance management. This project serves North Carolina’s 8th Judicial District (Lenoir, Wayne, and Green counties). The total population of the district is 201,483. The project includes partnerships between Lenoir County, the 8th Judicial District FARC program, Hope Restorations Inc., Kinston Community Health Clinic, and the National Center for State Courts. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural challenges, high and persistent poverty, and improved safety in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Surry County Government

North Carolina

Surry County Government applied for Category 1c grant funding in the amount of $595,568. The project will establish an accessible continuum of care to reduce the impact of substance use on the community. Currently, two essential components are lacking in the community: (1) data analysis to link needs, treatment, and services; apprise cost effectiveness; and track impact outcomes countywide; and (2) transportation assistance for people needing treatment. This proposal outlines a plan to implement these two critical elements. This project serves Surry County, North Carolina, which has a population of 73,232. The project includes partnerships between preventive, treatment, recovery, social, and justice service agencies in the county. Priority considerations addressed in this application include: rural, Qualified Opportunity Zones, a high rate of treatment admissions, high rates of overdose and overdose death, and a high rate of drug-related crime.

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Wayne County Sheriff's Office

North Carolina

The Wayne County Detention Center, through the Wayne County Sheriff’s Office, applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The purpose of the project is to provide best practices in developing, implementing, and sustaining a jail-based medication-assisted treatment (MAT) program during incarceration and upon release. The benefits include stemming the cycle of arrest, incarceration, and release typically linked to substance use disorders; helping to maintain a safe and secure jail for inmates and staff; and reducing costs, since data indicate that MAT for opioid use disorders is cost-effective. This project serves Wayne County, North Carolina, which is the fourth largest agricultural county in the state with over 123,000 residents. The project includes partnerships between Southern Health Partners, Wayne County’s Day Reporting Center, Wayne County Health Department, and One to One with Youth, Inc. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones and persistent poverty.

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Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services

Nebraska

The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services will form a multidisciplinary action group; develop a data dashboard utilizing a combination of vital records data, hospital discharge data, Nebraska Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (NePDMP) data, and geographic information of treatment services available in Nebraska; and increase the number of toxicology trainings and reports on suspected drug-related overdose fatalities. This data dashboard will aid in areas such as developing targeted interventions, creating data-driven responses, and determining best practices. The action group will encompass representatives from areas such as behavioral health and treatment agencies, pharmacies, hospitals, law enforcement, and local agencies, all of whom will then oversee the development of this dashboard. The prescription drug overdose prevention epidemiologist will be the staff member responsible for collecting and reporting the required performance measures.

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Bergen County

New Jersey

The County of Bergen applied for a Category 1a urban area grant in the amount of $1,200,000. The BCPO-COSSAP Project will establish a comprehensive, evidence-based response to the opioid crisis. This response will be composed of multiple teams and initiatives, including the Heroin Addiction Recovery Team (HART), Fair Lawn Initiative (FLI), and a county-level Overdose Fatality Review Team. These teams will work independently and share data to best coordinate response needs for opioid and addiction needs across Bergen County. This project serves Bergen County, which is home to 948,046 residents. The project includes partnerships between the Bergen County Police Chiefs Association; Bergen County police departments; Newark Community Solutions, Center for Court Innovation; Center for Alcohol and Drug Resources, a division of Children’s Aid and Family Services; Bergen County Health Department and Division of Alcohol and Drug Dependency; and New Bridge Medical Center. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Bergen County’s 12 Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Bergen County Prosecutor's Office

New Jersey

The goal is to use grant funds to establish a data-sharing platform and agreements among all stakeholders to exchange critical pieces of information (or data elements) to conduct real-time data analysis. The process would entail using victim information contained in existing data sets to develop a notification system to alert stakeholders in real time when a high-frequency overdose victim becomes “active” in one of the data sets. The activation would also trigger a response by health care partners to provide the appropriate intervention and treatment options. This notification system would be leveraged through artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning techniques.

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Camden County

New Jersey

The Camden County Department of Corrections (CCDOC) applied for Category 1a grant funding in the amount of $1,200,000. The Comprehensive Substance Use and Recovery Support Program for Incarcerated Individuals in the Camden County Correctional Facility (CCCF) will expand the department’s capacity to identify, respond to, treat, and support individuals incarcerated in the CCCF with a history of substance use, specifically individuals with a non- opioid use disorder. Through the use of substance use and recovery support services for individuals both pre- and post-release, this project serves Camden County, New Jersey, which has a population of approximately 513,000 across 37 municipalities. The project includes partnerships between Camden County Department of Health and Human Services Office of Mental Health and Addictions, CFG Health Network, and CCDOC’s contracted medical and mental health provider, as well as partnerships with Project HOPE, the Center for Family Services, Volunteers of America, Genesis Counseling Centers, and the New Jersey Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services. These agencies will support CCDOC reentry efforts, providing vital support to individuals such as housing, MOUD, SU, and mental health counseling, employment, and job-readiness training. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a high-poverty area and Qualified Opportunity Zone. There are six objectives of the proposed program. Objective 1 includes the implementation of a substance use screening tool and assessment during the booking and classification phase to effectively identify individuals incarcerated with a substance use disorder. Objective 2 provides substance use counseling and support services for individuals (both in person and via telehealth) while incarcerated in CCCF. Objective 3 provides integrated care coordination for individuals during a period of incarceration to promote and foster health equity of the justice-involved population. Objective 4 provides peer recovery support services to individuals transitioning home following release from the CCCF through the development of Peer Support Teams. Objective 5 provides recovery support housing to individuals that have engaged in substance use and/or receiving MOUD and are housing insecure at the time of release from CCCF. Lastly, Objective 6 is focused on establishing a Reentry Release Center to include a team of CDACs to continue the coordination of services upon release from CCCF.

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City of Paterson

New Jersey

The City of Paterson, New Jersey, applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Paterson Coalition for Opioid Assessment and Response (Pat-COAR) will support for a peer recovery support specialist to perform proactive outreach on a group and personalized basis with residents in “hot spot” areas, as identified based on the collective data and research of Pat-COAR. The program will also support an Overdose Fatality Review Team to better analyze and understand overdose cases and trends, allowing Pat-COAR to identify any gaps in services or policies that would potentially minimize its high rate of overdoses. Also, the program provides to hire staff needed to build the capacity and sustainability of Pat-COAR over time, as well as support the proposed activities. This project serves the city of Paterson, which has a population of 145,800 residents. The project includes partnerships between law enforcement entities from the local (Paterson Police Department), county (Passaic County Prosecutor’s Office), and interstate/federal (New York/New Jersey High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area) levels; addiction and health professionals from local (Paterson Department of Health and Human Services/Division of Health), county (Passaic County Department of Health and Human Services/Division of Mental Health and Addiction Services), and regional (St. Joseph’s University Medical Center) levels; community-based partners who work hands-on to develop policy (Health Coalition of Passaic County) and programs (Eva’s Village) to support the region’s substance-using residents; and traditional Narcan distributors (Paterson Fire Department and Paterson Emergency Medical Services). Priority considerations addressed in this application include the needs of high-poverty areas; supporting law enforcement in Qualified Opportunity Zones; and addressing areas with a high rate of primary treatment admissions for heroin/opioids, high rates of overdose deaths, and a lack of accessibility to treatment providers.

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Morris County Sheriff's Office

New Jersey

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office will use funds to maintain and expand its Hope One Mobile Outreach vehicle program, which is deployed twice a week to areas experiencing a high volume of opiate overdoses. This expansion will include the launch of a Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI), utlizing municipal and county law enforcement with the assistance of community partners. The research partner, Epiphany Community Services, will be provided with the data to track client progress and report progress so that any necessary program adjustments can be made.

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State of New Jersey, Department of Law and Public Safety

New Jersey

The New Jersey Department of Law and Public Safety (DLPS) will collaborate with state agencies to develop a computerized, data-sharing dashboard, known as the Integrated Drug Awareness Dashboard (IDAD). The IDAD will leverage data sets specific to each agency, such as the New Jersey State Police and the Division of Consumer Affairs, and include identified and de-identified arrest and drug seizure data and Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) data in one centralized platform. The goal is to synthesize multiagency information to create specialized and user-specific reports that will improve the sharing of opioid information across state agencies. The dashboard will create a holistic picture of the opioid environment, help develop targeted interventions, develop analytic opioid hot spots, and push notifications. Montclair State University will serve as the action research partner.

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State of New Jersey, Department of Law and Public Safety

New Jersey

The New Jersey Department of Law and Public Safety (DLPS) will collaborate with state agencies to develop a computerized, data-sharing dashboard, known as the Integrated Drug Awareness Dashboard (IDAD). The IDAD will leverage data sets specific to each agency, such as the New Jersey State Police and the Division of Consumer Affairs, and include identified and de-identified arrest and drug seizure data and Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) data into one centralized platform. The goal is to synthesize multiagency information to create specialized and user-specific reports that will improve the sharing of opioid information across state agencies. The dashboard will create a holistic picture of the opioid environment, help develop targeted interventions, develop analytic opioid hot spots, and push notifications. Montclair State University will serve as the action research partner.

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Pueblo of Pojoaque

New Mexico

The Pueblo of Pojoaque will create the Pueblo of Pojoaque Opioid Prevention and Intervention Project, a court-based, pre-prosecution diversion program. A project coordinator and an outreach worker/case manager will be hired. The State of New Mexico Sentencing Commission will serve as the evaluation partner for the proposed project.

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Nevada State Board of Pharmacy

Nevada

The Nevada State Board of Pharmacy will support the proactive use and enhancement of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) by (1) enhancing the Nevada PDMP with the addition of NarxCare, a software platform that will improve prescription monitoring program (PMP) reports by allowing for the incorporation of NarxCare analytics, visualizations, clinical intervention tools, and additional public health data sets into Nevada’s PMP AWARxE database; (2) improving the quality and accuracy of PMP data through an extension of the Board of Pharmacy and PMP’s current Audit Project, which looks at the accuracy and completeness of the data in the Nevada PMP; and (3) enhancing the PMP’s ability to provide quality reports of suspected fraudulent or otherwise unlawful or inappropriate prescribing patterns to authorized law enforcement agencies and/or occupational licensing boards for further investigation.

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Reno Police Department

Nevada

The Reno Police Department, in partnership with the Washoe County Health Department and other community partners, will implement evidence-based practices in the field of tobacco prevention by launching a mass-reach health communication campaign with the goal of changing the social norms surrounding prescribed opioids. This program will also follow up with individuals/families who have experienced a suspected overdose and provide information regarding resources such as how to seek a substance abuse evaluation and/or counseling, medication-assisted treatment (MAT) and other treatment, and where to obtain naloxone. Finally, the program will launch a prescriber education campaign.

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Dutchess County Health Department

New York

The Dutchess County Department of Behavioral and Community Health will lead an effort to prevent overdose fatalities through timely, comprehensive information sharing within a communitywide collaborative that includes public safety, public and behavioral health, and other vested partners. This will strengthen community capacity to respond to acute overdose-related risks and build a sense of shared efficacy and resiliency in the face of an ongoing, ever-evolving epidemic. These goals will be achieved by applying objective methodology in three areas: (1) transformation of an existing underdeveloped task force into a streamlined, well-equipped, data-driven, opioid response collaborative, (2) enhanced overdose surveillance relating to populations at risk as well as emergent, high-risk substances, and (3) comprehensive capacity building initiatives aimed at integrating harm-reduction principles into existing service delivery models and identifying and addressing disparities in access to behavioral health services.

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Erie County

New York

Erie County, New York, will establish an opioid mortality review board to inform future public health practice and policy related to primary and secondary prevention of opioid addiction and mortality through action research that operationalizes insight gained from mortality reviews.

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Erie County

New York

In response to the 303 percent increase in synthetic opioid-related deaths from 2014 to 2015, the Erie County Department of Health will increase community access to naloxone and link overdose survivors to treatment. The project aims to more effectively link individuals across the sequential intercept model to care. In cases in which individuals cannot be connected directly to care, they can be linked to local organizations for support. Funds will also be used to create an ongoing systematic geospatial analysis of law enforcement and emergency medical services (EMS) calls for service and the product that caused each overdose. To take advantage of other information systems, the program will leverage data from I-STOP, the state’s prescription drug monitoring program. The program will be led by a multidisciplinary team with representatives from consumer peer groups, EMS, and behavioral health. Researchers from the University of Buffalo will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Erie County

New York

The County of Erie applied for Category 1a urban area grant funding in the amount of $1,200,000. The Erie County New York Comprehensive Quick Response Program to Overdose will enhance the county’s Law Enforcement Diversion Programs using the Quick Response Program to Overdose (QRP model). The model will blend various strategies to work in a comprehensive manner, including expanding naloxone distribution/deployment by law enforcement, police remotely referring overdose survivors from the field to MAT in emergency departments (using the Buffalo MATTERS telemedicine appointment capability), and leveraging the HIDTA ODMAP app to link survivors to the public health peer teams for follow-up and navigation to long-term treatment agencies. The Erie County Comprehensive Quick Response Program to Overdose will provide a seamless flow after an opioid overdose rescue by police. ODMAP will initiate a follow-up through the public health peer response team, who will reach out to the survivor to offer support at each stage of the process and track their engagement with treatment. This project serves Erie County, with a population of 925,702. The project includes partnerships between public health, law enforcement, emergency medicine services, high- intensity drug trafficking areas (ODMAP program), county mental health, family advocates, and the SUNY at Buffalo research evaluation partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include targeting high-poverty areas and designated Qualified Opportunity Zones in economically distressed areas of Erie County.

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Office of the Bronx County District Attorney

New York

The Bronx District Attorney, in partnership with the Bronx Criminal Court and the Center for Court Innovation/Bronx Community Solutions, will address the crisis in opioid deaths and overdose by enhancing the Overdose Avoidance Recovery (OAR) Program. This enhanced OAR Program will be expanded into two additional courtrooms. BetaGov/Litmus at NYU will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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The City of Ithaca

New York

The City of Ithaca applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Ithaca LEAD Program (ILP) will reduce repeated arrests and incarceration for people whose unlawful conduct stems from unmet behavioral health needs in the city of Ithaca and adjacent towns in Tompkins County, New York. ILP will reduce racial disparities in criminal justice involvement for the region’s African-American population, reduce unnecessary arrests and prosecutions imposed on the justice system, improve officer efficiency, maximize the value of the city’s community-based service array, and improve outcomes for this complex population. In the era of COVID-19, these changes are especially critical. Across the nation, officers are confronting new challenges in interacting with people on the street; jails are striving to reduce incarceration so as to mitigate COVID-19 risks; and judges, attorneys, and court staff are seeking to reduce congestion in courtrooms. This project serves the city of Ithaca, New York. The project includes partnerships with Tompkins County District Attorney and Legislature, Community Leadership Team DCI, Ithaca Police Department, Tompkins County Sheriff, REACH Medical, Greater Ithaca Activities Center, and the LEAD National Support Bureau. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones, as well as challenges faced by rural communities and high-poverty areas.

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Adams County

Ohio

The Adams County Health Department will embed a community care coordinator within the Sheriff's Office, Probation Department and County Court to provide a real-time interface between community recovery resources and the criminal justice system; expand capacity of the quick response team; expand drug treatment opportunities to incarcerated individuals, including MAT; establish peer recovery support for individuals returning to the community before release; establish a Handle with Care program; and establish an overdose fatality review committee.

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Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board of Cuyahoga County

Ohio

The Alcohol, Drug Addiction and Mental Health Services Board of Cuyahoga County will use grant funds to support a Data Subcommittee of the Heroin and Opioid Task Force (HOTF). The Data Subcommittee will develop an action plan and a blueprint for an integrated data sharing platform to be implemented by the HOTF. Begun Center of Case Western Reserve University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Butler County of Ohio

Ohio

Butler County of Ohio applied for Category 1B grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Butler County COSSAP project aims to reduce the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances on individuals within its communities, through reducing the number of overdose fatalities, as well as mitigating the impacts of on crime victims by supporting comprehensive, collaborative initiatives. This project serves Butler County, home to a population of 382,000. The project includes a partnership with Miami University’s Center for School-based Mental Health Programs. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural challenges in a high-poverty area and Qualified Opportunity Zone.

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City of Columbus, Department of Public Safety

Ohio

The City of Columbus Department of Public Safety applied for grant funding in the amount of $1200,000 under Category 1A. This project serves the 1,316,756 residents of the city of Columbus and Franklin County, Ohio. The Rapid Response Emergency Addiction Crisis Team (RREACT) EMS Outreach Unit is a unit within the Division of Fire’s Training and Emergency Medical Services Bureau and is supported by the Division of Police’s Crisis Response Team. RREACT EMS outreach members include firefighters/paramedics, Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) certified peace officers, a substance use case manager, a registered SUD nurse, a family case manager, and trauma specialist. This multidisciplinary outreach team goes directly into communities to connect with opioid users who survive overdose, but then refuse EMS transport to the emergency room. The goal of the outreach unit is to proactively create connections and build relationships with opioid users. RREACT follows up with addicted individuals in the community within 48 hours of nonfatal overdose; checks in on their immediate health and wellness; provides resource information, and creates opportunities for users to link with harm-reduction supplies, treatment programs, and social service supports. RREACT actively partners with local treatment providers, public health departments, justice agencies, and Franklin County’s Family and Children First Council to achieve desired project outcomes. Gretchen Hammond with Mighty Crow, Inc. serves as the evaluator for the proposed project. The applicant is eligible for COSSAP priority consideration based on overdose rates in Franklin County and the City of Columbus and the project’s impact on increased public safety in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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City of Dayton, Ohio

Ohio

The Dayton Police Department (DPD) — serving the city of Dayton, Ohio (population 146,040) — sought grant funding from COSSAP Category 1b in the amount of $899,964 to provide services in Dayton, mitigating the incidence of overdose/overdose deaths and addressing a substantial increase in opioids, stimulants, and other illicit substance use. DPD will support development, implementation, and expansion of a comprehensive, quick-response model by adding additional staff of certified peer support personnel, including in-reach services with the Montgomery County Jail, and targeting veterans and other identified at-risk populations. DPD will apply best-practice law enforcement strategies, including installation of FLOCK Safety License Plate Reader units and upgrading family-friendly interview rooms into evidence-based prevention programs operated by WestCare Ohio, and will contract with Cordata Health Initiatives to implement a customizable database designed for and currently being utilized by COSSAP-funded programs in Ohio to track and report quick-response and peer-lead services. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Columbus Public Health

Ohio

The objective of the initiative is to enhance public safety, behavioral health, and public health by leveraging existing data sets to inform implementation of highly focused opioid interventions. Columbus Public Health will hire a HIDTA/ODMAP data integration project manager and contract with an IT vendor to develop and implement application program interfaces to export real-time, first responder overdose data from the local records management system to ODMAP. The project team will then train local police and fire departments on how to access and analyze countywide HIDTA data. Columbus Public Health will also hire a substance use disorder epidemiologist to combine local public health and social determinant data with HIDTA public safety data. This data set will serve as the foundation for a countywide interactive overdose data tool. Mighty Crow, Inc. will serve as the evaluator for the data integration project.

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Dayton and Montgomery County

Ohio

Public health – Dayton and Montgomery County will work with county partners and Ascend Innovations to create a more robust multidisciplinary approach to data sharing by incorporating law enforcement data, coroner’s office data, mortality data, crime lab data, criminal justice data, treatment data, hospital emergency department and inpatient encounter data, and naloxone administration data. The data will be used by the county’s Community Overdose Action Team and the Poisoning Death Review Committee to create a comprehensive view of the addicted population in Montgomery County, Ohio, and to assist in developing specific plans for prevention and intervention strategies. Ascend Innovations will also serve as the evaluator on the proposed project.

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Fairfield County

Ohio

Fairfield County, Ohio, will implement the Fairfield County Overdose Response Team (FORT). Strategies include deploying an Overdose Response Team to perform follow-up visits with persons who have had a nonfatal overdose; providing expedited access to treatment, including medication-assisted treatment (MAT), to persons who have had a nonfatal overdose; performing overdose fatality case reviews; connecting people who identify as having a substance use disorder with available treatment and recovery options outside of the criminal justice system; and tracking every overdose in real-time using the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP). Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Franklin County

Ohio

Franklin County, Ohio, applied for grant funding under Category 1A in the amount of $1,200,000. This project will serve individuals incarcerated at the Franklin County Jail and screened as at-risk for substance use dependency and drug-related overdose. The purpose of the project is to (a) reduce drug-related overdoses and deaths, (b) increase peer support and treatment referral and linkage, (c) increase access to medication-assisted treatment pre- and post-release, and (d) decrease recidivism. The Fast Track to Treatment initiative includes partnerships with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, Franklin County Municipal Court, Southeast Inc., Alvis180, and ADAMH. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a program model that focuses services in a county with a demonstrated disproportionate number of drug overdose deaths (43.3 overdoses per 100,000 as compared to the U.S. rate of 20.7 overdose deaths per 100,000) and program implementation intended to improve public safety by targeting services in federally designated Qualified Opportunity Zones. Dr. Gretchen Clark-Hammond, CEO of Mighty Crow, shall serve as program evaluator for the proposed project.

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Franklin County Municipal Court

Ohio

Franklin County Municipal Court applied under Category 1A for grant funding in the amount of $903,289 to support and enhance its MAT, Assessment, Referral, Care and Hope (MARCH) project. This project serves Franklin County and the areas surrounding Columbus, Ohio, with an estimated population of 922,223. The purpose of the project is to continue to fund, expand, and enhance the court’s MAT program — an innovative and effective collaborative effort among Franklin County and City of Columbus justice and government stakeholders. Grant funds would continue to support the positions of MAT project manager and one community case manager through 2023. Enhancements would add an additional community case manager and a contracted peer support specialist to significantly increase the capacity of the program, opening more days to in-custody referrals and facilitating the offering of a full-time behavioral health walk-in clinic. The project includes partnerships between Franklin County Municipal Court, Columbus City Attorney, Office of Justice Policy and Programs, Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, Franklin County ADAMH Board, and a variety of community behavioral health providers. The MARCH program will enhance public safety in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services

Ohio

The Ohio Office of Criminal Justice Services (OCJS) applied under Category 2 on behalf of the State of Ohio for grant funding in the amount of $6,000,000 for the First Responder Diversion Programs in Ohio project. Through this grant, first responder diversion (FRD) programs will be created and/or expanded in rural and urban areas across Ohio. The project serves Cuyahoga, Fairfield, Franklin, Hamilton, Lawrence, Lorain, and Mansfield counties. Federally designated Qualified Opportunity Zones and high-poverty areas were a consideration in identifying several of the pilot sites. The project partners include OCJS, Cordata, Talbert House, the University of Cincinnati, and drug task forces in participating FRD sites.

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Ross County Health District

Ohio

Ross County Health District applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The Ross County Peer Recovery Service Center will expand access to treatment and recovery support services for individuals at high risk of overdose involving opioids, stimulants, and other substances through a new program of countywide coordination of recovery support services. System coordination will occur early in the individual’s involvement with the criminal justice system, identifying key recovery sites for navigation and service connection. The project will employ a dedicated peer recovery services coordinator who works out of the Ross County Community Action Commission (RCCAC) through a newly developed service line: a countywide Peer Recovery Service Center (PRS Center). In addition, dedicated recovery housing capacity will be a part of the recovery support system, as will an enhanced network of peer recovery supporters. The Ross County Peer Recovery Service Center will enhance the applicant’s current integrated service delivery system that promotes public health, sustained recovery, and safety for the community. This project serves Ross County, with a population of 76,666. The project includes partnerships between the RCCAC, Ross County Sheriff’s Office and Ross County Jail, Ross County Probation, Post Overdose and Response Team, Ross County Common Pleas Court, Ohio University-Chillicothe, the Ross County Recovery and Outreach Center. Priority considerations addressed in this application include documentation of rural challenges.

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Clackamas County, Health Housing and Human Services

Oregon

Clackamas County applied for grant funding in the amount of $900,000 under Category 1B for the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) Plus project. This project serves the 424,747 residents of Clackamas County, which consists of urban, suburban, and rural areas spanning 1,879 square miles (larger than the state of Rhode Island). The primary goals of LEAD Plus are to continue and enhance the implementation of the LEAD program and add a new layer of coordination that connects the many opioid and substance abuse efforts in the county into a truly comprehensive and integrated approach. Key partners included in this project include the Clackamas County District Attorney’s Office, Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office, Milwaukie Police Department, the Indigent Defense Corporation, homeless/houseless service providers, and substance abuse treatment providers. There are no priority considerations with this project.

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Marion County

Oregon

Marion County will expand its Law Enforcement-Assisted Diversion (LEAD) initiative in targeted neighborhoods in Salem, Oregon. The Oregon Criminal Justice Commission will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Montgomery County

Pennsylvania

The Montgomery County Department of Public Safety (MCDPS) will develop and enhance public safety, behavioral health, and public health information sharing partnerships that leverage key public health and public safety data sets (e.g., de-identified prescription drug monitoring program [PDMP] data, naloxone administrations, emergency medical services [EMS] run data, fatal and nonfatal overdose data, 9-1-1 dispatch information) by implementing the Emergency Medical Overdose Surveillance System (EMODSS) Project. The EMODSS Project will be established as a permanent initiative under MCDPS, Division of Homeland Security, Intelligence Fusion Center. The EMODSS Project will be used to supplement Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP) data with a goal of creating an automatic feed from EMODSS to ODMAP. The information acquired through EMODSS will enhance the Liberty High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDTA) regional situational awareness picture.

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Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) will fund projects for counties that work with the Technical Assistance Center at the University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy’s Program Evaluation and Research Unit to implement evidence-based programs to reduce overdose deaths.

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Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency will sponsor the Forensic Drug Chemistry Surveillance Project to support five counties (Beaver, Franklin, Lackawanna, Schuylkill, and Washington) in establishing new quantitative, real-time forensic drug chemistry analysis workflow protocols. These new protocols will identify responsive strategies that enhance investigations by connecting cases and promoting rapid dissemination of critical information. Accurate, complete, and timely forensic drug chemistry data within a region can help law enforcement plan strategic and immediate responses based on local needs, and larger public safety investigative agencies will be able to use the drug intelligence to monitor trends and intercept drug trafficking routes. Improved drug testing will also enhance public information sharing about the dangers of drugs in the community. The University of Pittsburgh School of Pharmacy Program Evaluation and Research Unit will serve as a research partner.

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Pennsylvania Department of Health

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania Department of Health will develop and implement a systematic, sustainable Web-based solution to obtain timely and accurate statewide drug overdose death report data from Pennsylvania county coroners and medical examiners. Overdose death data collected and analyzed through this solution will be used to support statewide, county, and local-level drug death information sharing for public safety, behavioral health, and public health prevention, as well as rescue and treatment initiatives. This data will also be incorporated into Pennsylvania’s Opioid Data Dashboard.

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Pennsylvania State Police

Pennsylvania

The Pennsylvania State Police will use funds to implement Project TRIAD, which will synchronize innovative, technology-driven enforcement strategies, leveraging information received through community input. Project TRIAD is named for its three component parts: Component 1–Targeted Enforcement; Component 2–Problem Oriented Policing through Community Partnerships; and Component 3–Public Outreach. In addition, a research component will be funded to assess impact.

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Lancaster County

South Carolina

Lancaster County, South Carolina, will implement a pre-arrest diversion program based on the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) model. A research partner will be selected at the time of the award. The applicant agreed to make data available through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Lancaster County

South Carolina

The entire county of Lancaster is 98,012 residents. The proposed project will provide resources for training of every law enforcement officer in the county on LEAD (Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion); promote visible prescription drug takeback strategies; and assist with training, handling, and distribution of naloxone. Priority considerations include the presence of a Qualified Opportunity Zone, poverty, and rural challenges. This application is for Category 1c grant funding.

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City of Gallatin

Tennessee

The Gallatin Police Department (Sumner County, Tennessee, population 191,283) — in partnership with the Sumner County Sheriff’s Office, local treatment provider Volunteer Behavioral Health, local courts, and scientific consultants — requests $892,085 from the Bureau of Justice Assistance FY 2020 Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program (Category 1b: Competition ID BJA-2020-17024) to implement a law enforcement-led substance abuse response to address the county’s increasing substance abuse problem. The proposed community-based strategy to address substance abuse and overdose risk will be implemented through enhancing connections to treatment; delivering evidence-based recovery services including needs assessment, individualized treatment plans, case management, medicated assisted treatment (MAT); providing a police-led awareness and prevention program to the county’s K-12 population, as well as a provision of Narcan to officer first responders. OJP priorities addressed include serving a designated Qualified Opportunity Zone, high-poverty areas, evidence-based services delivery, and program evaluation.

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Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County

Tennessee

The Metro Public Health Department proposes to implement the Opioid Overdose Reduction Program which will implement a robust overdose monitoring and data reporting system, to drive the strategic planning of the Overdose Reduction Workgroup, a multi-disciplinary team of over 26 agencies and organizations. The program will conduct an analysis of the severity of the opioid crisis in Nashville and provide much needed data to community stakeholders. Additionally, they will implement an Overdose Fatality Review Team to further investigate overdose causes, trends and opportunities for earlier intervention. Grant funding is requested for: a full-time comprehensive opioid abust program coordinator and full-time epidemiologist, .35 FTE opioid response coordinator will carry out project requirements.

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Tennessee Bureau of Investigation

Tennessee

The Tennessee Bureau of Investigation Crime Lab will decrease response times for reporting drug analysis and case results to stakeholders, expand forensic testing to improve the comprehensiveness of drug data available, and develop an avenue to report drug abuse in more real time than is currently available in the state.

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Tennessee Department of Health

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Health will create an overdose epidemic response coordinator position; integrate data on overdoses that occur and are treated in the field, including data from emergency medical services and law enforcement; and increase the ability to expand analytic work such as studying the roles of new drugs of concern including gabapentin, stimulants, and illicit drugs.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services is applying for category 2 in the amount of $6,000,000. This project will increase local community’s capacity to respond to the presence of Substance Use Disorders (SUDs) among justice involved individuals and reduce the impact of SUDs among justice involved individuals. This project will include partnerships with the Tennessee Department of Health to support the expansion of Medication Assisted Treatment (MAT) in COSSAP jail sites and the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation to support Drug Endangered Children Task Forces, Field Based Drug Testing, and overdose data mapping. This project serves to support ten new implementation project sites; 1) Blount, 2) Roane, 3) Anderson, 4) Bradley, 5) Dickson, 6) Cheatham, 7) Roane, 8) Tipton, 9) Grundy and 10) Montgomery counties. Priority Considerations: Qualified Opportunity Zones: All 10 sites targeted for this COSSAP project have Qualified Opportunity Zones in their county: See Attachment 6. High-Poverty Areas or Persistent-Poverty Counties: Two of the targeted counties: Grundy and Cocke are rated by the TN Dept of Economic and Community Development as “Distressed”, while the other eight (8) counties are rated as “Transitional”. Poverty rates for all targeted counties are above the national average (12.3%) with Grundy (28.5%), Cocke (25.0%) and Bradley (18.0%) all exceeding the Statewide poverty rate of 16.7%. Address Specific Challenges That Rural Communities Face: Six of the ten sites selected have more than (50%) of their population residing in rural areas, which Grundy County having (100%) of its population residing in a rural area.

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Bexar County Commissioners Court

Texas

Bexar County Commissioners Court will create a strategic plan, develop a dashboard of all data related to opioid use and abuse, and fund evidence-based outpatient and residential treatment. The University of Texas at San Antonio will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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Montgomery County

Texas

The Montgomery County, Texas, District Attorney’s Office will take the lead with a multiagency collaboration to comprehensively tackle issues surrounding prescription opioid abuse in the county. A preventive and proactive data-driven approach will be adopted to identify doctor shoppers, “pill mill” doctors, problematic pharmacies, and prescription opioid addicts. The goal is to hold doctors and pharmacies accountable and to prosecute doctor shoppers who divert prescription opioids to streets for profit. The two primary components of the project include a pre-crime unit and a Prescriber Outreach and Education Program.

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Utah Department of Health

Utah

The Utah Department of Health Violence and Injury Prevention Program proposes to develop a data information sharing system with public safety and local health departments. The key indicators will include mortality, morbidity, and prescription of behavior-related data using data from death certificates, medical examiner records, syndromic surveillance, prescription drug monitoring data (known as the Controlled Substance Database), emergency department records, and poison control data. These efforts will assist in developing an information sharing system that is timely to inform prevention efforts.

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Arlington County Government

Virginia

Arlington County Department of Human Services’ Behavioral Health Division (BHD) applied for grant funding under Category 1B in the amount of $899,815 over three years. This project will serve Arlington County (population 235,000) and is particularly focused on response in high-poverty regions of the county where opioid use and opioid overdoses remain prevalent. The project also works across traditional jurisdictional boundaries to provide wraparound services for individuals identified as high risk or otherwise involved in the Arlington criminal justice system. The purpose of this project is to improve access to and treatment in the detoxification program; provide early intervention to people arrested on substance use-related charges and identify alternatives to incarceration; improve recovery options by adding a reentry program to an established residential program; maintain collaboration between the police and BHD to address opioid overdoses and activity hotspots; assess and provide interventions for children and families impacted by substance use; and evaluate the use of evidence-based treatment and outcomes. The proposed addition of 1.0 FTE therapist and 1.0 FTE case manager will allow BHD to enhance services along the Sequential Intercept Model. The therapist will be focused on establishment, implementation, and evaluation of evidence-based programming in a variety of treatment settings and will be the clinical lead for the creation of diversion service plans and “Plans of Safe Care” for substance-exposed infants. The case manager will serve as the lead clinical staff for co-response with police and fire services to the community, and will provide community outreach, education, and naloxone distribution. Both positions will expand the reach of MAT programming in the county and will address gaps identified through comprehensive community assessment. A key feature of the proposal is a collaboration with an academic partner, Dr. Taxman from George Mason University, to evaluate performance, including outcomes and outputs, along with the development of fidelity assessments to measure evidence-based practice adoption. The project expands upon existing partnership with the police and fire departments, Child Protective Services, the offices of the sheriff, the public defender, and the Commonwealth’s attorney.

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Chesterfield County

Virginia

Chesterfield County Sheriff’s Office is applying for grant funding in the amount of $1,192,430. This project serves the metro Richmond area with a population of over 500,000 and is submitted under Subcategory 1a. The purpose of the project is to provide specialized pretrial supervision to individuals at high risk for overdose and expand reentry planning and medication-assisted treatment to inmates. The project includes partnerships between the Chesterfield County Sheriff’s Office, Chesterfield Community Corrections Services, Chesterfield Mental Health Supportive Services, and a local evaluator. Priority considerations addressed in this application include providing services to Qualified Opportunity Zones, addressing persistent poverty, and serving a region that has been disproportionately impacted by substance abuse.

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Fairfax County Office of Strategy Management

Virginia

Fairfax County will develop a Secure Integrated Data approach with engagement by representatives of the Fairfax County health and human services community; public safety, education, legal, and technology representatives of the organizations involved; state prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) representatives; and service providers to adopt and promote the information sharing efforts. The team will develop data governance structures to support the policy for data sharing and then develop a data sharing model by using global information sharing standards to share data across various systems. George Mason University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project. IJIS Institute will provide technical support for the development of a data governance structure.

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Vermont State Agency of Human Services

Vermont

The State of Vermont Department of Health Division of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs will identify community-level data sets pertaining to opioid use/misuse and associated physical, mental, environmental, and social health consequences and develop a data platform for community groups to access and manipulate data to identify pertinent local areas of concern. Vermont is recruiting a research partner for the proposed project.

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Makah Indian Tribe of the Makah Indian Reservation

Washington

In the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Program application, the Makah Tribe is proposing to utilize funding under Category 1: Local or Tribal Applicants, Subcategory 1c. The applicant intends to utilize funds from this application to continue funding the two FTE positions from the previous application: the COSSAP case manager and one coordinator, who will implement the LEAD program, develop MAT protocols, and help further expand the Sisuk Houses. There are no priority considerations for this application.

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Washington State Department of Health

Washington

The Washington State Department of Health (DOH) will link prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) data with various public health data sets housed within DOH and expand data visualizations and data sharing to help Washington State (and local partners) make data-based decisions regarding treatment and prevention of prescription drug-related health outcomes.

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Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians

Wisconsin

The Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Indians (a federally recognized Indian Tribe) applied under Category 1c for grant funding in the amount of $589,959. This project will serve the Ojibwe Indian membership of the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe (LCO) of rural northern Wisconsin. The population of the Tribe is 7,796, with thousands more familial descendants. The purpose of the project is to provide evidence-based opioid treatment that supports services to tribal individuals in need of transitional or recovery housing with a Bimaadiziwin tribal culture-based peer recovery support services, including medication-assisted treatment and recovery. The project will improve collaboration and partnerships between tribal and community-serving agencies in support of an EBT “wraparound” system of comprehensive Anishinaabe culture-based mental health treatment and recovery that uses the ASAM Criteria to determine the most appropriate level of treatment and care. This project includes important partnerships between the LCO Residential Treatment Center and tribal and county human services agencies, such as: LCO Comprehensive Community Services, LCO Tribal Court, LCO Bizhiki Wellness Center, Social Services Department, Vocational Rehabilitation Program, and the Minimaajisewin Home Program. OJP policy priority areas for Category 1 that are addressed by this project application from the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe applicant are: applications that address specific challenges that rural communities face, individuals who reside in high-poverty areas (the reservation), and individuals who offer enhancements to public safety in economically distressed communities.

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Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin

Wisconsin

The Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin will mitigate the impact of opioid abuse on crime victims within the Menominee tribal jurisdiction by hiring two full-time crisis response case managers at Tribal Social Services to work with first responders, the Clinic of Behavioral Health, and the Child Protection Team when children are present at the scene of an overdose or are impacted by familial substance abuse. The grant funds will also be used to support a program coordinator who will assist in implementing the program, a clinical therapist, and a family preservation worker.

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Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin

Wisconsin

The Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin will develop a Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI) model of law enforcement diversion to reduce opioid abuse and the number of overdose fatalities. Grant funds will be used to support a program coordinator, who will assist in implementing the program; a clinical therapist; and three peer support specialists. The applicant agreed to make data available through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Milwaukee County

Wisconsin

Milwaukee County, with an estimated population of 945,726, through the Milwaukee County Medical Examiner’s Office and in collaboration with the Milwaukee Community Justice Council, the Medical College of Wisconsin, and a variety of public health and public safety partners, sought $1,200,000 in Subcategory 1a grant funding to create a Milwaukee Overdose Public Health and Safety Team (OD-PHAST). This project would expand and further coordinate current efforts to address overdoses, as well as overall substance misuse issues across the county. The OD-PHAST project aims to: (1) expand the delivery and analysis of near real-time data between multiple public health and public safety partners; (2) utilize both aggregate data and insights from case reviews to develop strategies and recommendations for changes to reduce the likelihood of future overdose incidents; (3) increase capacity to deliver timely toxicology findings to public health and safety partners; (4) enrich understanding of fatal overdose risk factors through expanded next-of-kin interviews; and (5) connect families impacted by overdose, particularly children, to services to mitigate the impact of the trauma experienced. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high-poverty areas and Qualified Opportunity Zones.

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West Allis Health Department

Wisconsin

The West Allis Health Department will implement the Cardiff Model, an enhanced violence surveillance system and intervention that involves information sharing and violence prevention among law enforcement, public health, and the medical field. The model requires (1) the collection, linking, and mapping of interpersonal violence information from emergency departments, police departments, and other relevant areas (e.g., emergency medical services [EMS]); and (2) the convening of a multidisciplinary stakeholder consortium to discuss and utilize timely information to implement data-informed violence-prevention activities. The Cardiff Model has not been evaluated regarding its impact in the United States and requires evaluation in the proposed health-care, population, and environmental contexts. Further, by incorporating and discussing opioid-related data sets (e.g., the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program [ODMAP], the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program [PDMP]) alongside violence data sets, this model may have utility for addressing the intersection of violence and opioid misuse. The Medical College of Wisconsin and its Comprehensive Injury Center will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Wisconsin Department of Justice

Wisconsin

The Wisconsin Department of Justice, in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Health Services, will develop a comprehensive state plan that will assist the state and localities in engaging and retaining individuals in the justice system in diversion, treatment, and recovery services. This plan will identify training and technical assistance programs for localities aimed at improving treatment engagement and client outcomes; supporting the tracking, compiling, coordinating, and dissemination of statewide and local data; and expanding the collaborative efforts between state and local agencies. Funding is also provided to implement the plan once it is approved.

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Wisconsin Department of Justice

Wisconsin

The Wisconsin Department of Justice (DOJ), in partnership with the Wisconsin Department of Safety and Professional Services, Department of Health Services, and Medical College of Wisconsin, will develop and enhance local and state information sharing partnerships by adding overdose fatality review teams in eight jurisdictions, providing training to these new teams, and piloting a bidirectional information sharing of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) with the DOJ, emergency medical services, and the medical examiner to better inform prescribers of overdose activity.

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City of Charleston

West Virginia

The City of Charleston will use funding to hire a full-time coordinator and peer recovery coaches and support joint funding of a data analyst with the West Virginia Drug Intervention Institute (WV DII) at the University of Charleston to expand data analysis. Project partners include Thomas Hospital and WV DII. The City of Charleston has engaged WW DII at the University of Charleston as its research and evaluation partner.

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West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources

West Virginia

The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources proposes a partnership among the West Virginia Office of Emergency Medical Services (EMS); the West Virginia Poison Control Center; medical examiners; the West Virginia Office of Maternal, Child and Family Health; and EMS, fire, and law enforcement personnel. The project will develop and enhance information sharing partnerships by linking data and distributing performance measure reports with respect to prehospital naloxone administration as well as fatal and nonfatal overdoses. The University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill Department of Emergency Medicine EMS Performance Improvement Center will serve as the research partner for the proposed project. A Web service will be developed that delivers data to the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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