Grantee Projects

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Jefferson County Board of Health

Alabama

The Jefferson County Board of Health will create the Recovery Resource Center Peer Navigation Initiative (RPC-PNI). The project's overarching goal is a 30 percent reduction in opioid overdose deaths in Jefferson County. In 2014, Jefferson County reported a 140 percent spike in heroin deaths, and from 2013 to 2016, it underwent a 340 percent increase in fentanyl deaths. The program will provide a peer navigator to connect 600 individuals to treatment services immediately after a nonfatal overdose or to identify a need for treatment services absent an overdose. RPC-PNI will also convene a multidisciplinary oversight team to develop effective strategies and provide overdose prevention education to 750 individuals in the community. The University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) Department of Emergency Medicine will serve as the project’s research partner.

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Jefferson County Commission

Alabama

The Jefferson County Commission will implement the Jefferson County Forensic Care Management Team, which will be colocated at the Jefferson County Jail. The project will expand the availability of peer recovery support services, both pre- and post-release. The University of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Psychiatry will serve as the research partner for this project.

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City of Longmont

Colorado

The Longmont Department of Public Safety, located in Boulder County, Colorado, will expand its Crisis Outreach Response and Engagement (CORE) program. Grant funds will be used to support a paramedic, two peer case managers, a project coordinator, and treatment for individuals who are struggling with substance use or co-occurring disorders. The University of Colorado, Boulder, will serve as the research partner on the proposed project.

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Executive Office of the Governor of Delaware – Criminal Justice Council

Delaware

The Delaware Criminal Justice Council, in partnership with the Division of Substance Abuse and Mental Health, will implement the Delaware Smart Criminal Justice and Treatment Change Team to effectively integrate initiatives, processes, and programs into standard treatment policies and practices maximizing efforts. Grant funds will implement programs to effectively integrate initiatives, processes, and programs into standard treatment policies and practices maximizing efforts. Grant funds will be used to implement comprehensive policies and practices identified in the planning phase and outlined in the coordinated state criminal justice and treatment plan. Subgrants will be awarded that assist and provide financial support to units of local government and community services agencies to implement strategies that support treatment and recovery service engagement; increase the use of diversion and alternatives to incarceration; and reduce the incidence of overdose death. The geographic area is the entire state of Delaware.

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City of Clinton

Iowa

Clinton, Iowa, will increase community collaboration with a multidisciplinary team to address high-frequency utilizers of multiple systems. To tackle this community epidemic, the multidisciplinary team engaged in this project has determined to formulate and implement a Drug Abuse Response Team (DART) composed of Clinton police officers and Clinton Fire Department EMS, as well as specially trained Area Substance Abuse Council members, who will work in partnership with other community agencies such as Mercy and Bridgeview to identify, educate, assist, and provide resources to at-risk individuals. In addition, a medication-assisted treatment (MAT) program will be implemented that will partner to provide peer recovery support services, cognitive behavioral therapy, and case management. Dr. Barbara St. Marie of the University of Iowa College of Nursing will serve as the research partner for the proposed project. The applicant agreed to provide data through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Hamilton County Council on Alcohol and Other Drugs

Indiana

The Hamilton County, Indiana, Council on Alcohol and Other Drugs will implement an initiative known as the Community Opioid Prevention Effort (COPE). COPE will follow the Quick Response Team (QRT) diversion model, which will provide immediate intervention at on-scene overdoses, conduct visits to survivors of nonfatal overdoses, and provide recovery support and other community resources to individuals and their families. Treatment providers and recovery coaches will develop and implement strategies to identify and provide treatment and recovery support services. COPE will also encourage cross-system planning and collaboration among community officials, law enforcement, pre-trial services, the courts, probation, health-care providers, public health providers, emergency medical services, and substance abuse treatment providers.

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Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County

Indiana

The Marion County Public Health Department will expand the Indianapolis Harm Reduction Team (IHART) Program to employ two full-time peer support specialists, who will facilitate access to treatment, health-care resources, and community-based services. IHART will hire a full-time project coordinator to oversee the operation and serve as a liaison with the criminal justice and public health systems, mental health and substance abuse treatment providers, and other government and community-based entities. Indiana University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County

Indiana

The Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County will tackle opioid misuse in Indianapolis, Indiana, by increasing community access to naloxone and connecting high-risk, opioid-misusing patients to undergo treatment for substance misuse. The project, dubbed Project POINT (Planned Outreach, Intervention, Naloxone, and Treatment), is a comprehensive response to Indiana’s opioid crisis. The project is operated by the Health and Hospital Corporation of Marion County, with close collaboration from the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department (IMPD) and the City of Indianapolis Office of Public Health and Safety. An additional project goal is to work with the Center for Criminal Justice Research to integrate data among local law enforcement, public safety, treatment, and public health agencies. The Indiana University Center for Criminal Justice Research will serve as the action research partner.

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Louisiana Department of Health

Louisiana

The Louisiana Department of Health, Office of Behavioral Health will support access to, and engagement in, treatment and recovery support services for offenders with opioid abuse in Orleans and East Baton Rouge Parishes jails, as well as increased use of diversion in Orleans, Jefferson, and St. Tammany Parishes. This will be accomplished by providing support for peer support specialists and treatment staff members at the Day Reporting Center in New Orleans, which serves both Orleans and Jefferson Parishes, and at the St. Tammany Parish Jail to enable those with opioid use disorders to be assessed and referred to a specialty court.

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Louisiana Department of Health

Louisiana

The Louisiana Department of Health’s (LDH) Office of Behavioral Health plans to implement the Louisiana Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Program (LaCOAP), a program that aims to reduce the number of opioid-related overdoses and overdose deaths among offenders. The program will develop a multiagency planning team to develop a plan to address opioid use disorders in offenders. This multidisciplinary approach includes a large number of community partners, including the Louisiana Commission on Law Enforcement and Administration of Criminal Justice, LDH’s Office of Public Health/Bureau of Health Informatics, the Louisiana Department of Public Safety and Corrections, and the New Orleans Division of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Other partners include the New Orleans Sheriff’s Department and the local governing entities that provide behavioral health services in three of the targeted parishes, to include Metropolitan Human Services District, Capital Area Human Services District, and the Florida Parishes Human Services Authority.

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Boston Police Department

Massachusetts

The Boston Police Department (BPD), in partnership with the Boston Public Health Commission, will expand and enhance a community-based, first-responder, post-overdose follow-up program in the city of Boston. Multidisciplinary teams consisting of at least one BPD member and one public health advocate will conduct home-based outreach intervention with at least 100 individuals per quarter who have recently experienced nonfatal opioid overdoses to provide access to naloxone and recovery support services. These individuals will receive prioritized access to detoxification and treatment services, as well as access to medication-assisted treatment. Dr. J. Richard Woy of JRW Associates will serve as research partner.

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City of Holyoke

Massachusetts

The Holyoke Police Department will use funds primarily for salaries that support a project coordinator, a narcotics intervention officer, a recovery coach, and a mental health supervisor. Through the Project Recovery and Engagement of Addicts and Chronic users of Heroin (REACH) Project, the Holyoke Police Department will address the significant opiate drug problem in Holyoke, Massachusetts. Project goals are to decrease the number of overdose victims, decrease the number of narcotics crimes, and increase the support systems for people addicted to opioids in Holyoke.

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City of Holyoke Police

Massachusetts

The Holyoke Police Department will implement Project Heroin Addiction Recovery Team Support (HARTS), designed to address the significant opiate drug problem in Holyoke, Massachusetts. The Holyoke Police Department will partner with the recovery coach to meet with all survivors of an opioid overdose, either in the community or at the emergency department. The University of Massachusetts, Amherst, will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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East Bridgewater Police Department

Massachusetts

Plymouth County Outreach (PCO), a police and treatment outreach approach to high-risk individuals, will continue to develop its countywide, multifaceted approach involving law enforcement, hospital, recovery, and local treatment partnerships that conduct post-overdose home follow-up visits to overdose survivors who are not initially admitted to a hospital or treatment services. The local research partner, Kelley Research Associates, created a unique, real-time overdose tracking system that supports the daily overdose response program. The East Bridgewater Police Department will make data available through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

North Carolina

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ Integrated Opioid Abuse Program will develop a task force composed of tribal decision makers who will create policies and keep agencies accountable to indicators of success. A multidisciplinary team will provide direct services to high-frequency drug users and their families. These two teams will work together to develop a plan to create a secured mental health/opioid abuse treatment center and secure transportation for participants becoming certified peer recovery support specialists.

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New Hampshire Department of Justice

New Hampshire

The New Hampshire Department of Justice will use internet-enabled tablets and a secure application to allow for real-time case monitoring and peer recovery support. Three pilot locations were selected for this project.

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Morris County Sheriff's Office

New Jersey

The Morris County Sheriff’s Office will use funds to maintain and expand its Hope One Mobile Outreach vehicle program, which is deployed twice a week to areas experiencing a high volume of opiate overdoses. This expansion will include the launch of a Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI), utlizing municipal and county law enforcement with the assistance of community partners. The research partner, Epiphany Community Services, will be provided with the data to track client progress and report progress so that any necessary program adjustments can be made.

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City of Albuquerque

New Mexico

In response to increasing rates of opioid overdose across New Mexico, the City of Albuquerque will implement the Albuquerque Peer to Peer program, which seeks to more effectively connect survivors with substance abuse treatment immediately after an overdose incident. Between January 2015 and June 2016, the City of Albuquerque Fire Department responded to nearly 600 opiate overdoses. Peer engagement specialists will ensure a streamlined connection between survivors and those at risk of overdose presenting in the emergency department for treatment. To complement this comprehensive and sustainable approach to treatment, the University of New Mexico’s Institute for Social Research will work to evaluate the impact of the program on the city’s population. The peer engagement specialists will work closely with the Albuquerque Police Department and a handful of community-based treatment providers to reduce the incidence of opioid overdoses in Albuquerque.

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New Mexico Department of Health

New Mexico

The New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH) will partner with Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center in Santa Fe County and Presbyterian Espanola Hospital in Rio Arriba County to expand the identification of individuals with drug overdoses at these two hospitals to the NMDOH and ensure that a peer support worker is providing information on treatment resources to those who survive an overdose. The overall goal is to ensure that patients who have overdosed have access to treatment and thus end the cycle of overdose deaths. Naloxone will also be purchased through this grant for distribution. The prescription drug overdose prevention coordinator and the peer support worker will provide data for the grant reporting as well as track and analyze overdose surveillance data.

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Pueblo of Pojoaque

New Mexico

The Pueblo of Pojoaque will create the Pueblo of Pojoaque Opioid Prevention and Intervention Project, a court-based, pre-prosecution diversion program. A project coordinator and an outreach worker/case manager will be hired. The State of New Mexico Sentencing Commission will serve as the evaluation partner for the proposed project.

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Erie County

New York

In response to the 303 percent increase in synthetic opioid-related deaths from 2014 to 2015, the Erie County Department of Health will increase community access to naloxone and link overdose survivors to treatment. The project aims to more effectively link individuals across the sequential intercept model to care. In cases in which individuals cannot be connected directly to care, they can be linked to local organizations for support. Funds will also be used to create an ongoing systematic geospatial analysis of law enforcement and emergency medical services (EMS) calls for service and the product that caused each overdose. To take advantage of other information systems, the program will leverage data from I-STOP, the state’s prescription drug monitoring program. The program will be led by a multidisciplinary team with representatives from consumer peer groups, EMS, and behavioral health. Researchers from the University of Buffalo will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Erie County

New York

The Erie County Probation Department will implement the Probation Opioid Response Initiative. The focus of this effort will be to expand services to offenders diverted to probation. The program will institute the use of a validated risk assessment tool to identify probationers who are at risk for opiate/opioid overdose and place them on specialized caseloads. Two peer navigators will be assigned to work alongside probation officers. Naloxone will be distributed to probationers on the opioid caseload at assignment and to probationers who overdose within 24–48 hours after notification. Hilbert College will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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City of Dayton

Ohio

Dayton, Ohio, will enhance the Get Recovery Options Working (GROW) program. GROW is a coordinated multidisciplinary response team that includes the Dayton Police Department, Dayton Fire Department, and peer recovery specialists. Dr. Mary Huber from Wright State University will serve as the research partner for the proposed project. The applicant agreed to provide data through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Fairfield County

Ohio

Fairfield County, Ohio, will implement the Fairfield County Overdose Response Team (FORT). Strategies include deploying an Overdose Response Team to perform follow-up visits with persons who have had a nonfatal overdose; providing expedited access to treatment, including medication-assisted treatment (MAT), to persons who have had a nonfatal overdose; performing overdose fatality case reviews; connecting people who identify as having a substance use disorder with available treatment and recovery options outside of the criminal justice system; and tracking every overdose in real-time using the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP). Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Franklin County

Ohio

The Franklin County Pathways to Healthy Living Program will offer services to individuals booked into the Franklin County Correctional Center and in active withdrawal to include screening, cognitive behavioral treatment, medication-assisted treatment (MAT), and linkage to peer support. Participants will be linked with a team pre- and post-release to ensure continuity of care. Funding will support implementation of You’re Extra Special (YES) for children aged 7 to 14 with a parent diagnosed with addiction.

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Guernsey County

Ohio

The Guernsey County Sheriff’s Office will increase support services for those impacted by addiction. The key component of the proposal is the implementation of a diversion program with an evidence-based curriculum at the Justice Center. Funds were also requested to purchase and install equipment to increase the safety and security of inmates in the county jail by improving the intake process at the jail.

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Hocking County

Ohio

The Hocking County Prosecutor’s Office, in collaboration with the Hocking County Sheriff’s Office, local treatment providers, and the Hocking County Health Department, has expanded an administrator role for the Hocking Overdose Partnership Endeavor (HOPE). HOPE is a coordinated, multi-disciplinary intervention and risk-reduction response team that is dedicated to connecting individuals who are at risk for overdose and/or survivors of a non-fatal overdose and their families with substance abuse and behavioral health treatment providers or peer recovery supports. HOPE consists of law enforcement, other first responders, treatment providers, child welfare providers, public health providers, and the prosecutor’s office. The applicant agreed to make data available through Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Clackamas County

Oregon

Clackamas County Community Corrections will improve the data infrastructure and develop diversion strategies that target incarcerated individuals eligible for early release into treatment, individuals on probation and reentering the community who meet the criteria for medication-assisted treatment (MAT), and supportive housing for justice-involved females to reunify with their children while receiving treatment or for those who are pregnant. BetaGov/Litmus at New York University (NYU) will serve as the evaluator for the proposed project.

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Marion County

Oregon

Marion County will expand its pilot diversion program in Salem, Oregon. This project will be based on the Law Enforcement-Assisted Diversion (LEAD) model.

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Marion County

Oregon

Marion County will expand its Law Enforcement-Assisted Diversion (LEAD) initiative in targeted neighborhoods in Salem, Oregon. The Oregon Criminal Justice Commission will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Rhode Island State Police

Rhode Island

The Rhode Island State Police will implement the Heroin-Opioid Prevention Effort (HOPE) Initiative, the nation’s first statewide law enforcement-led opioid overdose outreach program, modeled after the Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI). The HOPE Initiative engages law enforcement personnel in a proactive outreach strategy to combat the opioid overdose epidemic by bringing together substance-use professionals and members of law enforcement with the mission of reaching out to individuals at risk of overdosing and encouraging them to be assessed and treated. The project will support the technology, professional expertise, and partnerships needed to gather comprehensive data, perform outreach visits, execute research, and contribute to the administration of the HOPE Initiative. Data gathered through the HOPE Initiative will be shared with the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP). Kelley Research Associates will serve as the project evaluator.

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Rhode Island State Police

Rhode Island

The Rhode Island State Police will implement the Heroin-Opioid Prevention Effort (HOPE) Initiative, the nation’s first statewide law enforcement-led opioid overdose outreach program, modeled after the Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI). The HOPE Initiative engages law enforcement personnel in a proactive outreach strategy to combat the opioid overdose epidemic by bringing together substance-use professionals and members of law enforcement with the mission of reaching out to those who are at risk of overdosing and encouraging them to be assessed and treated. The project will support the HOPE Initiative by enhancing the ongoing efforts of state and local government to address the opioid overdose epidemic, including gathering real-time law enforcement data on opioid overdoses to identify individuals with opioid use disorder. In addition, the project will support a program involving law enforcement and case management to provide outreach to individuals with opioid use disorder. Outreach efforts will include victims and child welfare services. Data gathered through the HOPE Initiative will be shared with the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP). Kelley Research Associates will serve as the project evaluator.

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Shelby County Government

Tennessee

The Shelby County Division of Community Services will use addiction peer recovery specialists to link individuals with substance abuse to treatment and case management services, bridge the gap between victims and resources, and be on call 24/7/365 with law enforcement, emergency medical services, and local emergency rooms working to identify patients and encourage them into treatment. The University of Memphis will serve as the research partner for this project.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services will develop the Sullivan County Overdose Response Team (SCORT) in Sullivan County. Grant funds will be used to support a coordinator and peer navigator(s), and a case manager will provide support services to both individuals who have overdosed and victims as well as administrative grant support. The case manager will also coordinate with the Tennessee Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (TADEC) and the Sullivan County District Attorney’s Office through the Sullivan County Family Justice Center. The SCORT coordinator will be responsible for exporting and uploading all relevant data into the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP) data collection tool. An independent evaluator will serve as the project evaluator.

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Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services will develop the Hamilton County Police and Community Overdose Response Team (PCORT) in Hamilton County. Grant funds will be used to support a coordinator and peer navigator(s), and a case manager will provide support services to both individuals who have overdosed and victims, as well as providing administrative grant support. The case manager will also coordinate with the Tennessee Alliance for Drug Endangered Children (TADEC) and the Hamilton County District Attorney’s Office through the Hamilton County Family Justice Center. The PCORT coordinator will be responsible for exporting and uploading all relevant data into the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP) data collection tool. An independent evaluator will serve as the project evaluator.

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Harris County Community Supervision and Corrections Department

Texas

The Harris County Community Supervision and Corrections Department will develop protocols for diverting appropriate individuals to treatment assessments and community-based care; develop protocols for smoothing the transition between in-custody medication-assisted treatment (MAT] to community supervision and continued treatment for those exiting to probation; and link opioid-abusing individuals with recovery coaches to support recovery efforts, reduce barriers, and improve community engagement.

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Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Texas

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice Technology-assisted Treatment will expand the continuum of care for participants who need services for opioid abuse but lack the resources (e.g., transportation, recovery support) to obtain the services. The proposed pilot sites shall service clients who have used or abused opioids and are returning to a rural county in or surrounding one of the four cities (Amarillo, Longview, Odessa, and Texarkana) listed among the nation’s top 25 cities identified as having opioid users. These Texas counties may include but are not limited to Angelina, Bowie, Camp, Cass, Cook, Delta, Ector, Fannin, Franklin, Grayson, Gregg, Harrison, Hopkins, Houston, Hunt, Jasper, Kaufman, Lamar, Marion, Midland, Morris, Navarro, Nacogdoches, Newton, Nueces, Panola, Polk, Potter, Red River, Rockwall, Rusk, Sabine, San Augustine, San Jacinto, Shelby, Titus, Trinity, Tyler, and Upshur.

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Mason County

Washington

From 2009 to 2014, deaths related to heroin have doubled in Mason County, Washington; the county had the fourth-highest rate of death (2011–2013) attributed to opiates, with a rate of more than 14.1 per 100,000 compared with the state rate of 8.6 per 100,000. This project includes a public education campaign, a prescription drug take-back component, and naloxone distribution as well as a comprehensive look at Mason County’s treatment and recovery system. Project goals include reducing the number of opioid-related deaths, increasing the number of opioid users who own naloxone take-home kits, developing a local recovery and treatment services network. and improving public awareness about the dangers of opioids and about local treatment and recovery support services.

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Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation

Washington

The Puyallup Tribe of Indians, a federally recognized tribe in western Washington State, will implement the Community Reentry Services Project. Members reentering the community from inpatient treatment or a correction facility will receive treatment, case management, peer-to-peer mentorship, and vouchers for housing and transportation.

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Seattle Police Department

Washington

The Seattle Police Department, in partnership with the Washington State Department of Corrections, King County Prosecuting Attorney’s Office, and the Public Defenders Association, will enhance in-custody access to services, mentoring, and peer support; expand reentry access to services (including stable housing and opioid abuse-related treatment), mentoring, and peer support; and provide options for diversion to treatment for persons on community supervision instead of return to custody. BetaGov/Litmus at New York University (NYU) will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Kenosha County

Wisconsin

The Kenosha County Opioid Overdose Reduction Project was created in response to the high nonfatal overdose and opioid-related death rates in the community. The project utilizes state-certified peer support specialists to link overdose survivors and their families with treatment and support services. Local hospitals and the EMS community are partners in the effort to establish contact shortly after the initial overdose. The Kenosha County Opioid Overdose Task Force was formed in 2017 to promote awareness and education regarding opioid-related substance use disorders, overdose prevention, and harm reduction and to facilitate partnerships among member agencies - including EMS, hospitals, treatment providers, the recovery community, county government, the district attorney's office, probation and parole, the health department, the medical examiner's office, and law enforcement.

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Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin

Wisconsin

The Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin will develop a Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI) model of law enforcement diversion to reduce opioid abuse and the number of overdose fatalities. Grant funds will be used to support a program coordinator, who will assist in implementing the program; a clinical therapist; and three peer support specialists. The applicant agreed to make data available through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

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Milwaukee County Housing Division

Wisconsin

The Milwaukee Prostitution and Opioid Diversion Project (MPOD) within the Milwaukee County Housing Division will establish a public health and justice partnership to address the unique needs of women in street prostitution and sex trafficking who abuse illicit or prescription opioids (and other drugs) and frequently come into contact with the justice system for prostitution or drug-related arrests or as victims of sex trafficking. MPOD will enhance service capacity in the current Sisters Diversion Project, a municipal pre-arrest prostitution diversion program, building on the pre-existing partnership among the Milwaukee Police Department, the Milwaukee County Behavioral Health Division, the Milwaukee County District Attorney’s Office, local treatment agencies, and the Medical College of Wisconsin; and enhance coordination and services for women in Milwaukee County’s Early Interventions Program (specifically, its pretrial diversion program). MPOD will engage the Medical College of Wisconsin as the research partner for this project.

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Winnebago County District Attorney

Wisconsin

The Winnebago County District Attorney will improve data infrastructure and develop diversion strategies for people with opioid use disorders using evidence-based components. BetaGov/Litmus at New York University (NYU) will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

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Berkeley County Council

West Virginia

Aiming to reduce drug overdose rates in Martinsburg, West Virginia, the Berkeley County Council will implement the Berkeley County Volunteer Support Network. In 2014, Berkeley County had approximately 71 percent as many fatal overdoses per 100,000 people as Baltimore. To remedy the issue, the project strives to expand direct services to overdose survivors and improve the city’s ability to connect individuals to treatment services. Funds will also be utilized to conduct an analysis of the project’s effectiveness. The project will collaborate with the Berkeley County Health Department, the Berkeley County Day Report Center, the West Virginia State Police, the Martinsburg Police Department, and West Virginia University Medicine.

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City of Huntington

West Virginia

The City of Huntington, West Virginia, will implement a community Quick Response Team (QRT) that will include medical care providers, law enforcement, and recovery and treatment providers, along with research partners. This multidisciplinary team will strive toward a significant reduction in the number of overdoses, with an emphasis on the recurrent cases. Federal funds will be used to assess project participants’ needs and assess their capabilities and preferences to determine appropriate plans for intervention, which includes, but is not limited to, provision of access to recovery and treatment services. Community capacity and cohesion will be fostered by engaging and educating those communities that have been disproportionately affected by the crisis in substance abuse, mental health, treatment, and recovery service awareness. The overall target through the collaborative efforts of the QRT is to decrease the number of overdoses by at least 20 percent annually and the number of recurrent overdoses by 40 percent annually. The Marshall University Department of Public Health will serve as an action research partner.

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Logan County Commission

West Virginia

The Logan County Commission, in partnership with the Southwestern Regional Day Report Center in Logan, West Virginia, will implement the Fresh Start program, which will facilitate access to treatment services to overdose survivors. West Virginia has the highest drug overdose death rate in the nation. Overdoses attributed to prescription drug overdoses are especially prevalent in the southernmost counties of West Virginia, including Logan County. At the center of the program will be agricultural and artisan programming, which aims to reconnect clients with their communities. The program will offer community mentoring, interagency teamwork, life-based skills development sessions, craftsmanship, artisanship, and credit attainment through the local community college. Another key component of the program is the creation of the Logan County Health Department Satellite site, to provide increased access to basic health-care services. Marshall University will serve as the project’s research partner.

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West Virginia Division of Administrative Services, Justice and Community Services

West Virginia

The West Virginia Division of Justice and Community Services (WVDJCS) partnered with the West Virginia Office of Research and Strategic Planning (ORSP), the West Virginia Division of Health and Human Resources Bureau of Behavioral Health and Health Facilities (BBHHF), county commissions, and nonprofit residential recovery programs. Funds will be used to assist multiple-day report centers and residential recovery programs in increasing the number of peer recovery coaches and expanding available peer recovery services throughout the state.

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