Grantee Projects

Alaska icon graphic

Alaska Department of Public Safety

Alaska

The State of Alaska Tribal Diversion Project will support multiagency efforts in planning and implementing partnerships with tribes to establish effective law enforcement diversion programs for offenders, including those who abuse illicit or prescription opioids. This funding will support project implementation, enhancement, and management and address the opioid and drug epidemic in tribal communities. The deliverables will include implemented diversion agreements, along with subgrants to Alaska Tribes to directly support their efforts. Funding will also be used to support planning and collaboration among the Department of Law, the Department of Public Safety, the Department of Health and Social Services Division of Juvenile Justice, and Alaska Tribes.

Alaska icon graphic

Bristol Bay Native Association

Alaska

The Bristol Bay Native Association will use grant funds to respond to identified gaps by facilitating the development of an outreach/quick response team to support those impacted by the opioid epidemic throughout the recovery process. The outreach/quick response team will divert survivors of overdoses to substance abuse treatment. If children are present at the time of an overdose, the team will guide the families to resources. This project will provide community-wide education and prevention activities that help build coping skills and introduce healthy alternative activities, including culturally appropriate therapeutic art therapy. The project will incorporate overdose dectection mapping application program.

Alaska icon graphic

Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

Alaska

Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska applied for a Category 1c tribal/rural area grant in the amount of $599,673. The Comprehensive Tribal Action Plan for Opioid, Stimulants, and Substance Abuse Prevention in the Tlingit and Haida Communities will increase access to supportive services for substance use, decrease hospitalizations and overdose rates, and increase public safety using a local and culturally driven approach. A tribal action plan will be produced to map a strategic plan for specific, positive change in each tribal community to address alcohol and substance misuse. This project serves Juneau, Alaska, and additional villages in southeast Alaska. The project includes partnerships between the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Village Public Safety Officer Program, Tribal Court, Alaska Department of Corrections, Juneau Alliance for Mental Health Inc., Tribal Council members, and village leaders. Priority considerations addressed in this application include opportunity zones, as well as rural and high-poverty priorities.

Alaska icon graphic

Central Council Tlingit and Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

Alaska

The Tlingit and Haida Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Prevention and Intervention Project will plan, develop, and implement a civil diversion program though the Tlingit and Haida Court that targets Native families in southeast Alaska impacted by opioid abuse. The project will utilize a stakeholder consultation model for completing assessment, capacity building, and strategic planning necessary to implement and sustain a comprehensive, culturally competent diversion program and system.

Alaska icon graphic

Native Village of Port Heiden

Alaska

The Meshik Soul Healing Project will provide screening for substance abuse and referrals to treatment and will incorporate a cultural camp in the Native Village of Port Heiden and provide for appropriate services within the context of the Aleut, Alaska, Native/American Indian culture. The project will serve the villages of Perryville, Pilot Point, Port Heiden, and Ugashik. The villages have tribal councils, which function as tribal governments and are rural communities.

Alaska icon graphic

Native Village of Port Heiden

Alaska

The Native Village of Port Heiden is a federally recognized tribe located in Port Heiden, Alaska. The village proposes to procure marine/land equipment to aid in the enforcement and interception of illegal substance importation; develop a strategic plan utilizing the Sequential Intercept Model as a guide; procure transitional sober housing; and increase/strengthen youth services.

Arkansas icon graphic

Arkansas Community Correction

Arkansas

Arkansas Community Correction will establish the capability to provide technology-assisted treatment and recovery services for adult offenders under parole or probation supervision for substance abuse in 15 rural counties by purchasing hardware and software and increasing the bandwidth in the community supervision offices.

Arkansas icon graphic

Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration

Arkansas

The Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration is applying for a Category 2 statewide area grant in the amount of $6,000,000. The Arkansas COSSAP Project will address the opioid epidemic strategically and continue providing support to areas that have been disproportionally impacted by the abuse of illicit opioids, stimulants, and other substances, as indicated by a high rate of treatment admissions for substances other than alcohol; high rates of overdose-related deaths; and lack of accessibility to treatment and recovery services. The primary focuses of the proposed projects are comprehensive, real-time, regional information collection, analysis, and dissemination; the development of peer recovery services and treatment alternatives to incarceration; and continued Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-based Program (COAP) overdose investigations involving peer recovery services and the implementation of strategies identified in the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Strategic Plan. This project serves specific counties where high rates of opioid deaths have been identified in COAP Category 2; however, the specific subrecipients for the proposed projects have not been selected. The project includes partnerships between the Department of Finance and Administration Office of Intergovernmental Services (DFA-IGS), Department Human Services, Office of State Drug Director, and the Single State Authority, in addition to a new partnership between DFA-IGS and the Arkansas Coroners’ Association. Priority considerations addressed in this application include providing services to rural communities and the fact that the individuals (populations) intended to benefit from the project reside in high-poverty and/or persistent-poverty counties.

California icon graphic

Hoopa Valley Tribe

California

The Hoopa Valley Tribe will deliver customized interventions through the criminal justice system of Humboldt County and the Hoopa Valley Tribal Court. Among this project's deliverables are a full community needs assessment, an opioid diversion work plan, the implementation of data tracking systems across multiple domains, and broadened awareness of best practices for both county and tribal partners. The proposed project will be one of the first cross-jurisdictional diversion programs in Indian Country specifically designed to meet the opioid epidemic.

California icon graphic

Orange County Health Care Agency

California

The Orange County Health Care Agency applied for a Category 1a rural area grant in the amount of $1,200,000. The Orange County Health Care Agency’s Closing the Gaps by Expanding Access for Reentry Clients program will provide (1) a transfer for those leaving Orange County Central Jail to a peer support recovery specialist for transportation and immediate connection to a case coordinator at one of four MAT and substance use disorder (SUD) treatment county clinics, (2) MAT and SUD treatment services by psychiatrists at the four county clinics, and (3) training by addiction specialist(s) for mental health workers and physicians in the county clinics on SUD and best-practices for working with MAT clients. This project serves Orange County, California, with approximately 3.2 million residents. The project includes partnerships between Correctional Health Services (CHS) and is supported by the Orange County Sheriff’s Department. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high rates of overdose deaths and a need to increase accessibility to treatment providers in the City of Santa Ana with areas of 25 percent poverty.

California icon graphic

Yurok Tribe

California

Yurok Tribal Health and Human Services applied for a Category 1c tribal/rural area grant in the amount of $600,000. The Regional Expectations Accede to Coordination for Healing: Opioids Undercut by Treatment (REACH OUT) program will provide pre-court and court-connected culturally responsive programs that prioritize and expedite early assessment, treatment, recovery, and other supportive services to address communities impacted by opioids, stimulants, and other substances. The program will use the following strategies: (1) tribal healing to wellness approaches; (2) peer recovery; (3) team staffing and court hearings; (4) hot spot analysis (measuring increases in MAT and other drug treatment services); and (5) community education about culturally attuned services that meet the needs of the whole individual, family, and community. This project serves rural territories in Del Norte (1,139 tribal members and 27,828 total population), Humboldt (2,024 tribal members and 136,800 total population), and Trinity (45 tribal members) counties in northwestern California. The project includes partnerships between two tribal courts, two state courts, and their justice partners’ tribal and county law enforcement, attorneys, medical clinics, hospitals, and social services. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural, high-poverty communities facing real challenges, such as lack of public transportation, limited availability of alcohol and other drug treatment, and other support services.

California icon graphic

Yurok Tribe of the Yurok Reservation

California

The Yurok Tribal Court’s long-term goal is to develop, implement, and enhance diversion programs to address the escalating opioid epidemic within the Yurok community. The Yurok Tribe will be implementing the Yurok Opioid Diversion to Healing (YODH) Program. YODH will complete a Yurok Tribal Action Plan and community assessment, implement a community education and outreach program and workplace opioid awareness program, develop and implement a screening process in collaboration with the Humboldt and Del Norte Sheriffs’ Offices and the Superior Courts, and establish a formalized diversion process.

Colorado icon graphic

Boulder County

Colorado

Boulder County applied for a Category 1b suburban area grant in the amount of $884,014. Project RENTR (Readiness, Engagement, Navigation, Treatment, and Recovery) will implement a range of allowable grant activities, including evidenced-based treatment services, peer recovery support services, pre- and post-booking treatment alternative to incarceration approaches, and court-based interventions. Project RENTR will increase services and treatment options for those with substance use disorders in pretrial/pre-booking, including those benefitting from a new Colorado law that reclassifies a misdemeanor drug felony as a misdemeanor. Project RENTR will also provide access to comprehensive screenings, assessments, case management, and treatment in the jail environment. The project will continue case management services for 90 days during the reentry process and accelerate access to community-based treatment options. This project serves Boulder County, Colorado, which has a population of 326,196. The project includes partnerships with the Boulder County Community Services Department. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high-poverty and persistent-poverty counties and Qualified Opportunity Zones.

Colorado icon graphic

City of Alamosa

Colorado

The City of Alamosa applied for Category 1c tribal/rural area grant funding in the amount of $599,997. The Angel Project will provide a non-arrest, self-referral pathway to connect addicted individuals to intensive case management and harm-reduction resources using the evidence- based Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI) model. The City of Alamosa is creating a system of care that will allow individuals to receive appropriate levels of service and treatment to address root challenges rather than utilizing a criminal justice system clearly not equipped to address substance use disorder effectively. The Angel Project will provide a third pathway into intensive case management, service coordination, and connection to harm- reduction resources. This project serves approximately 50,000 residents in the 12th Judicial District. The project includes partnerships between the City of Alamosa, Center for Restorative Programs, and the 12th Judicial District Office of the District Attorney. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the disproportionate impact of opioids and other substances on the region, the specific challenges faced by rural communities, and the high poverty area served by the project.

Georgia icon graphic

Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council

Georgia

The Georgia Criminal Justice Coordinating Council applied for Category 2 statewide area grant funding in the amount of $2,289,701. The Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program will (1) establish a multi-locality naloxone initiative to include continued training for law enforcement personnel and provide funding to assist with the replenishment of the opioid reversal drug; (2) establish and implement a pre-arrest/post-booking diversion program for youth and adults who have a moderate to high risk of substance abuse within Athens-Clarke County; (3) provide K-12 youth in Athens-Clarke County with increased access to education and treatment; and (4) provide a comprehensive, real-time, information collection database for the City of Savannah to expand the pre-arrest diversion program, which is funded through the FY 2018 Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site Program (COAP). This project serves serve 23 of Georgia’s 159 counties. The project includes partnerships between Athens-Clarke County Unified Government and City of Savannah.

Georgia icon graphic

Screven County Sheriff's Office

Georgia

The Screven County Sheriff's Office applied for Category 1c tribal/rural grant funding in the amount of $587,825. The Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program will (1) employ needs assessment tools to identify and prioritize services for jail offenders, (2) expand diversion programs for drug offenders to improve responses to offenders at high risk for overdose or substance abuse and provide alternative-to-incarceration services to those suffering from substance abuse disorders, (3) deliver an evidenced-based prevention program, and (4) offer rigorous program evaluation providing feedback and improvement opportunities. This project serves Screven County, Georgia, with a population of 14,300. The project includes partnerships between the Community Service Board of Middle Georgia, Ogeechee Division; Drug Court for the Ogeechee Judicial Circuit; and scientific partners. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a 100 percent rural county, high-poverty area, and Qualified Opportunity Zone.

Iowa icon graphic

Iowa Governor's Office of Drug Control Policy

Iowa

The Iowa Governor’s Office of Drug Control Policy will facilitate the collation and dissemination of data from multiple sectors into a statewide opioid dashboard, the Iowa Opioid Data Exchange (IODE). The Division of Intelligence and Fusion Center will be the lead implementation agency for this project. Key partners include state agencies and other organizations with primary responsibility for administration of data, which are central to the success of this project. These partners include the Governor’s Office of Drug Control Policy, Department of Public Health, Iowa Board of Pharmacy (Prescription Drug Monitoring Program [PDMP]), Iowa Office of State Medical Examiner, Division of Intelligence/State Fusion Center (in coordination with the Midwest High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas [HIDTA]), State Crime Laboratory, Iowa Emergency Medical Services Bureau, Iowa Poison Control Center, and Iowa Division of Criminal and Juvenile Justice Planning. The multidisciplinary dashboard will provide a holistic and timely opioid-related surveillance report from a variety of public health and public safety data sets. IODE aims to improve the connectivity, cohesiveness, timeliness, and overall effectiveness of opioid-related surveillance data collection, analysis, and sharing to enhance the health and public safety response in rural communities and larger cities across Iowa.

Idaho icon graphic

Idaho Department of Health and Welfare

Idaho

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare (IDHW) will build a sustainable data infrastructure to ensure timely collection, analysis, and dissemination of opioid data. In addition, an action researcher will establish a suspected drug-induced death mortality review team. The data will be shared with Idaho’s strategic planning workgroup and other stakeholders. To address vulnerable populations, IDHW will work with the Idaho Office of Drug Policy to distribute naloxone in communities across Idaho. To educate prescribers in rural Idaho on substance abuse treatment and safe prescribing, IDHW will work with the University of Idaho to extend its Project ECHO program, an evidence-based, technology-enabled collaborative learning model that builds a clinician’s knowledge and ability to treat complex conditions. To evaluate Idaho’s efforts in educating prescribers on safe prescribing and prescription drug monitoring program (PDMP) utilization, IDHW will contract with a third-party evaluator.

Illinois icon graphic

Cook County Health

Illinois

Through this funding, Cook County Health will convene the Cook County Community Recovery Learning and Action Network to (1) address recovery housing capacity, including harm-reduction models of recovery housing and coordination for persons experiencing chronic homelessness; (2) begin development of a real-time, regional recovery housing information system, including collection, analysis, and dissemination across partners, and (3) implement and evaluate an intervention to promote referral for medications for addiction treatment, recovery support, and recovery housing for individuals with substance use disorders, with a special focus on individuals under supervision of the Cook County Adult Probation Department. This project serves Cook County, Illinois, which has 5.2 million residents. The project includes partnerships with transitional and recovery housing providers, substance use treatment providers, criminal justice partners, state agencies, community-based partners, and public health organizations. Priority considerations addressed in this application include high-poverty areas, and this project will offer enhancements to public safety in economically distressed communities (Qualified Opportunity Zones).

Indiana icon graphic

Indiana Criminal Justice Institute

Indiana

The Indiana Criminal Justice Institute (ICJI) and the Indiana Division of Mental Health and Addiction (DMHA) will implement a program that will provide tablets to individuals in three pilot sites with the end goal of allowing for remote monitoring of medications and sobriety by Fayette County Community Corrections. The project, titled “Technology-assisted Treatment Expansion in Fayette County,” will operate in three pilot sites: the Fayette County Sheriff's Department, Fayette County Community Corrections, and the House of Ruth. The pilot sites will be provided with tablets and the associated software. Upon release, eligible participants will be provided with wireless communication devices to allow remote monitoring of medications and sobriety. ICJI and DMHA will collaborate with Indiana University and two local service providers.

Indiana icon graphic

Indiana Family and Social Services Administration

Indiana

The Indiana County Leaders Collaboration for Change (ICLCC) will establish and/or build upon existing collaborative relationships between first responders, the criminal justice system, child welfare and foster care, behavioral health, primary care and addiction service providers to identify, develop (or) enhance, and implement specific countywide programs designed to reduce the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances on individuals and communities. The counties will achieve this by developing (or) enhancing and implementing one or more of the following within their county: Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) model programs (new to Indiana), prebooking or postbooking treatment alternative-to-incarceration programs, education and prevention programs to connect law enforcement in schools, embed social services with law enforcement to rapidly respond to drug overdoses where children are impacted, and expand access to evidence-based treatment and recovery support services across the criminal justice system. This project serves individuals across Knox, Wayne, Fayette, Floyd, Clark, Allen, and Madison counties. The project includes partnerships between the Division of Mental Health and Addiction and seven county coalitions. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural, high-poverty, and economically distressed regions.

Indiana icon graphic

Indiana Family and Social Services Administration

Indiana

The Indiana Division of Mental Health and Addiction, in partnership with the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute (ICJI), Choices Coordinated Care Solutions (Choices), Centerstone, Relias Analytics, and the Indiana University Center for Collaborative Systems Change, seeks to address the treatment needs of justice-involved individuals of southern Indiana in seven rural counties. The project will use mobile technology hardware, software, internet connectivity, and Web-based services, along with other available resources, to assess participants in drug courts as well as individuals with opioid use disorder (OUD) to gain access to services and provide treatment when necessary as a diversion from charges.

Kentucky icon graphic

Floyd County Fiscal Court

Kentucky

Floyd County Fiscal Court applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The Floyd County Family Services Program will (1) increase access to evidence-based treatment and recovery support services for 150 adults and/or families involved with the criminal justice system, (2) improve the health and recovery of 150 adults and/or families impacted by substance use disorders or co-occurring mental illness and substance abuse (including opioid use disorders), (3) reduce the number of overdose fatalities, and (4) improve the safety of children affected by parental drug overdose. This will be accomplished by addressing four allowable uses of funds, including (1) embedding social services (therapist) with law enforcement to rapidly respond to drug overdoses where children are affected; 2) provide naloxone for law enforcement to address opioid overdoses; 3) provide evidence-based treatment, recovery and peer recovery support services for the targeted population; and 4) coordinate with courts to prioritize and expedite treatment and recovery services to individuals at high risk for overdose and family issues stemming from SUD. This project serves Floyd County, Kentucky, with a population of 36,926. The project includes partnerships between the Mountain Comprehensive Care Center as the region’s Community Mental Health Center, Healthcare for the Homeless provider and Rape Crisis Center, Floyd County Family Court, Floyd County District Court, Floyd County Sherriff’s Office, Kentucky State Police, Appalachian Research and Defense Fund of Kentucky, Big Sandy Health Care, and Big Sandy Area Community Action Agency. Priority considerations addressed in this application include a rural community that faces a persistent-poverty and has a Qualified Opportunity Zone and areas with high rates of overdose.

Kentucky icon graphic

Purchase District Health Department

Kentucky

The Purchase District Health Department applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Purchase District Health Department program will implement a coordinated response to illicit opioids, psychostimulants, and counterfeit prescription drugs in Purchase. Four types of activities will be implemented: (1) provide naloxone for law enforcement and other first responders; (2) establish law enforcement and other first responder diversion programs; (3) conduct comprehensive, real-time, regional information collection, analysis, and dissemination; and (4) provide recovery support services, including recovery housing and peer recovery support services. This project serves eight counties totaling 196,563 people in western Kentucky. The project includes partnerships between law enforcement, first responders, and public health agencies who are active members of the Purchase Area Health Connections Opioid Task Force.

Massachusetts icon graphic

City of Northampton

Massachusetts

The City of Northampton applied for Category 1a urban area grant funding in the amount of $1,194,203. The City of Northampton Public Health/Public Safety Post-Overdose Outreach Program will reduce opioid overdose deaths and enhance public safety through the development, implementation, and expansion of interventions focused on the following allowable uses: law enforcement and other first responder diversion programs; comprehensive, real-time, regional information collection, analysis, and dissemination; and naloxone for law enforcement and other first responders. The first aim of this project is to expand DART — a countywide, nationally recognized public safety/public health post-overdose, high-risk substance use disorder, and family, community, and bereavement support program. This project serves a population of 28,726 in Northampton, Massachusetts. The project includes partnerships between South County Action EMS and Northampton Recovery Center. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones.

Massachusetts icon graphic

Franklin County Sheriff's Department

Massachusetts

The Franklin County Sheriff’s Department applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The Community Opportunity, Network, Navigation, Exploration, and Connection Team (CONNECT) will provide real-time assistance to individuals who survived, witnessed, or are at risk of an opioid overdose (e.g., family, family drug court participants, children, and community members). Team members will make in-person follow-up visits within 72 hours to individuals who survived or witnessed an opioid overdose, including affected children, to assess health, behavioral, and social needs. In addition, team members will connect individuals to community-based behavioral health, treatment, and recovery support services, while ensuring that opioid overdose survivors and witnesses navigate care across the criminal justice, human services, and educational systems. The program will expand Naloxone availability and appropriate use by first responders and law enforcement personnel, focusing on Naloxone deserts, and establish a system that offers real-time data collection, analysis, and dissemination of key data points to reduce opioid-related deaths. This project serves 87,130 residents in 30 communities spanning two rural counties in Western Massachusetts. The project includes partnerships between research scientists Pamela Kelley and Dr. Sean Varano and other community stakeholders representing law enforcement, the peer recovery community, harm reduction, courts, housing, and other basic human needs sectors.

Massachusetts icon graphic

Massachusetts Administrative Office of the Trial Court

Massachusetts

The Massachusetts Administrative Office of the Trial Court applied for a Category 2 statewide grant in the amount of $6,000,000. Project NORTH (Navigation, Outreach, Recovery, Treatment, and Hope) will increase treatment engagement and retention, decrease risk of overdose, and reduce risk of justice-system involvement. The objectives of the project are to increase access to evidence-based treatment and care coordination, decrease barriers to treatment retention, increase recovery support and recovery capital, and increase access to overdose-prevention education and naloxone distribution. This project serves 62 communities in 9 counties and 2.7 million people. Proposed locations include Boston, Brockton, Fall River, Lawrence, Lowell, Lynn, New Bedford, Pittsfield, Quincy, Springfield, Taunton, and Worcester. The project includes partnerships between the Executive Office of Health and Human Services, MassHealth (Medicaid office), Department of Public Health, Department of Mental Health, and the Massachusetts Alliance for Sober Housing. Priority considerations in this application include rural regions, high-poverty areas, and Qualified Opportunity Zones.

Michigan icon graphic

Cass County, Inc.

Michigan

Cass County, Inc. applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The Cass County COSSAP Project will employ a collaborative and comprehensive “gap-filling” approach to develop, implement, and/or expand/enhance existing trauma-informed evidence-based programming in order to identify, respond to, treat, and support those affected by illicit opioids, stimulants, and other substances. Objectives include the expansion of access to supervision, treatment, and recovery support services across the criminal justice system. The program will also create co-responder crisis intervention teams of trained law enforcement officers and behavioral health practitioners to connect individuals to trauma-informed and evidence-based co-occurring SUD treatment and recovery support services, as well as provide overdose education and prevention activities, and address the needs of children impacted by substance abuse. The project includes partnerships between 43rd Circuit Court judges, Woodlands Behavioral Healthcare Network, Office of the Sheriff, Office of the Prosecutor, Community Corrections, defense attorney, program coordinator, and the program evaluator. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the challenges that rural communities face and Qualified Opportunity Zone.

Michigan icon graphic

Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians

Michigan

The Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians (GTB) applied for Category 1c tribal/rural area grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The GTB COSSAP Project will address the current substance use issues identified by Grand Traverse Band’s Behavioral Health intakes, with statistics confirming the continued need for substance use services and recovery support for adolescents and adult federally recognized Native Americans who are experiencing depression, trauma, suicide ideation, and co-occurring disorders. This project serves 5,100 Native Americans in the GTB six-county service area located in lower northwest Michigan (Antrim, Benzie, Charlevoix, Grand Traverse, Leelanau, and Manistee counties). The project includes partnerships between GTB Public Safety and the GTB Tribal Court departments. Priority considerations addressed in this application include addressing specific challenges that rural communities face.

Michigan icon graphic

Michigan Department of Health and Human Services

Michigan

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services (MDHHS) will form a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of personnel from various community partners in an effort to work collaboratively and share data related to opioid abuse. Five Michigan counties will receive contracted substance abuse services to use during Child Protective Services (CPS) investigations, CPS open cases, and foster care cases. These services will be provided to rural counties that currently do not have access to the resources. MDHHS will provide at least ten “Connection between Trauma, Substance Abuse, and Mental Health” training sessions conducted by Dr. Stephanie Covington and her staff regarding the link between trauma and substance use. This statewide training will be available for all child welfare staff members. Finally, an online training will be developed to ensure that mandated reporters across Michigan have a robust understanding of their reporting requirements. Certification for the training will be provided. The University of Michigan will act as the action researcher to determine whether any changes to policy and child welfare practices would be beneficial.

Michigan icon graphic

St. Joseph County

Michigan

The County of St. Joseph applied for Category 1c rural/tribal area grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The County of St. Joseph COSSAP Project will employ a collaborative and comprehensive “gap-filling” approach to develop, implement, and/or expand/enhance existing trauma-informed evidence-based programming in order to identify, respond to, treat, and support those affected by illicit opioids, stimulants, and other substances. Objectives include the expansion of access to supervision, treatment, and recovery support services across the criminal justice system. The project will also create Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) to enhance co-responder crisis intervention teams to connect individuals to trauma-informed and evidence-based co-occurring SUD treatment and recovery support services; provide overdose education and prevention activities; and address the needs of children impacted by substance abuse. This project serves St. Joseph County, Michigan, with a population of 60,964. The project includes partnerships between the 45th Circuit Court of Michigan, sheriff, Community Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services, defense attorney, Office of the Prosecutor, Community Corrections, program evaluator, and program coordinator. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the specific challenges that rural communities face and a Qualified Opportunity Zone.

North Carolina icon graphic

Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

North Carolina

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians’ Integrated Opioid Abuse Program will develop a task force composed of tribal decision makers who will create policies and keep agencies accountable to indicators of success. A multidisciplinary team will provide direct services to high-frequency drug users and their families. These two teams will work together to develop a plan to create a secured mental health/opioid abuse treatment center and secure transportation for participants becoming certified peer recovery support specialists.

North Carolina icon graphic

Henderson County/Henderson County Health Department

North Carolina

The Henderson County Health Department, through the County of Henderson, applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The funds will be used to expand access to recovery support services. The program seeks to provide peer-delivered services with a focus on rehabilitation and recovery, utilizing North Carolina certified peer support specialists and care coordinators. Services provided by the certified peers include psychosocial rehabilitation, habilitation, family support and training, short-term crisis intervention, and empowerment. This project serves a suburban area or medium-sized county with a population between 100,000 and 500,000. The project includes partnerships between Henderson County’s Behavioral Health Summit, Free Clinix, and Hope RX.

North Carolina icon graphic

Lenoir County

North Carolina

The County of Lenoir applied for Category 1b grant funding for the amount of $288,713. The purpose of the project is to improve capacity of the district’s Family Accountability and Recovery Court (FARC) to serve families involved in the family court system due to substance dependence. Project objectives include providing more seamless and comprehensive treatment, as well as recovery services to parents with substance use disorders through increased staff capacity, enhanced training and professional development, and expanding treatment and complementary services. The project also aims at addressing systemic barriers faced by parents with substance use disorders through family transitional housing and expanded transportation assistance, as well as improving FARC performance through evaluation and performance management. This project serves North Carolina’s 8th Judicial District (Lenoir, Wayne, and Green counties). The total population of the district is 201,483. The project includes partnerships between Lenoir County, the 8th Judicial District FARC program, Hope Restorations Inc., Kinston Community Health Clinic, and the National Center for State Courts. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural challenges, high and persistent poverty, and improved safety in Qualified Opportunity Zones.

North Carolina icon graphic

Surry County Government

North Carolina

Surry County Government applied for Category 1c grant funding in the amount of $595,568. The project will establish an accessible continuum of care to reduce the impact of substance use on the community. Currently, two essential components are lacking in the community: (1) data analysis to link needs, treatment, and services; apprise cost effectiveness; and track impact outcomes countywide; and (2) transportation assistance for people needing treatment. This proposal outlines a plan to implement these two critical elements. This project serves Surry County, North Carolina, which has a population of 73,232. The project includes partnerships between preventive, treatment, recovery, social, and justice service agencies in the county. Priority considerations addressed in this application include: rural, Qualified Opportunity Zones, a high rate of treatment admissions, high rates of overdose and overdose death, and a high rate of drug-related crime.

North Carolina icon graphic

Wayne County Sheriff's Office

North Carolina

The Wayne County Detention Center, through the Wayne County Sheriff’s Office, applied for Category 1b grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The purpose of the project is to provide best practices in developing, implementing, and sustaining a jail-based medication-assisted treatment (MAT) program during incarceration and upon release. The benefits include stemming the cycle of arrest, incarceration, and release typically linked to substance use disorders; helping to maintain a safe and secure jail for inmates and staff; and reducing costs, since data indicate that MAT for opioid use disorders is cost-effective. This project serves Wayne County, North Carolina, which is the fourth largest agricultural county in the state with over 123,000 residents. The project includes partnerships between Southern Health Partners, Wayne County’s Day Reporting Center, Wayne County Health Department, and One to One with Youth, Inc. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones and persistent poverty.

New Hampshire icon graphic

New Hampshire Department of Justice

New Hampshire

The New Hampshire Department of Justice will use internet-enabled tablets and a secure application to allow for real-time case monitoring and peer recovery support. Three pilot locations were selected for this project.

New Mexico icon graphic

New Mexico Human Services Department

New Mexico

The New Mexico Human Services Department applied for Category 2 statewide area grant funding in the amount of $6,000,000. The implementation and enhancement of Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) programs in New Mexico will reduce criminal behavior, decrease criminal justice and emergency health service utilization, and improve public safety by supporting the development of LEAD in tribal and nontribal jurisdictions. The project aims to reduce drug overdose and improve the quality of life for people with a substance use disorder while supporting a coordinated collaborative response to behavioral health among criminal justice, social service, and public health systems. This project serves approximately 900,000 residents in New Mexico. The project includes partnerships between Bernalillo County, Santa Fe County, Taos County, Lea County, San Juan County and San Miguel County. Priority considerations addressed in this application include the high rate of individuals in New Mexico jails and prisons estimated to have an untreated substance use disorder and the high rates of racial disparity in corrections.

New Mexico icon graphic

Pueblo of Pojoaque

New Mexico

The Pueblo of Pojoaque will create the Pueblo of Pojoaque Opioid Prevention and Intervention Project, a court-based, pre-prosecution diversion program. A project coordinator and an outreach worker/case manager will be hired. The State of New Mexico Sentencing Commission will serve as the evaluation partner for the proposed project.

New York icon graphic

Albany County

New York

Albany County applied for a Category 1b suburban area grant in the amount of $898,062. The Growing LEAD: Increasing Operational Capacity to Improve and Expand Service in Albany County program will be increased with the addition of case managers to grow caseload capacity by 200 percent, an increase of approximately 50 new clients annually. Additionally, a full-time, dedicated project director and community engagement and outreach coordinator will be hired to improve coordination between partners and the public, increase public awareness of LEAD, and develop policies and procedures to better serve LEAD communities. This project serves the city of Albany, with a population of over 97,000. The project includes partnerships between Albany County Executive Office, District Attorney’s Office, sheriff, mayor of Albany, City of Albany Police Department, Center for Law and Justice, and Central Avenue Business Improvement District. Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones.

New York icon graphic

Erie County

New York

The County of Erie applied for Category 1a urban area grant funding in the amount of $1,200,000. The Erie County New York Comprehensive Quick Response Program to Overdose will enhance the county’s Law Enforcement Diversion Programs using the Quick Response Program to Overdose (QRP model). The model will blend various strategies to work in a comprehensive manner, including expanding naloxone distribution/deployment by law enforcement, police remotely referring overdose survivors from the field to MAT in emergency departments (using the Buffalo MATTERS telemedicine appointment capability), and leveraging the HIDTA ODMAP app to link survivors to the public health peer teams for follow-up and navigation to long-term treatment agencies. The Erie County Comprehensive Quick Response Program to Overdose will provide a seamless flow after an opioid overdose rescue by police. ODMAP will initiate a follow-up through the public health peer response team, who will reach out to the survivor to offer support at each stage of the process and track their engagement with treatment. This project serves Erie County, with a population of 925,702. The project includes partnerships between public health, law enforcement, emergency medicine services, high- intensity drug trafficking areas (ODMAP program), county mental health, family advocates, and the SUNY at Buffalo research evaluation partner. Priority considerations addressed in this application include targeting high-poverty areas and designated Qualified Opportunity Zones in economically distressed areas of Erie County.

New York icon graphic

New York State Unified Court System

New York

The New York State Unified Court System will partner with the Center for Court Innovation (CCI) and the New York State Office of Alcoholism and Substance Abuse Services to implement the New York State Opioid Reduction Teleservices Program. Up to three opioid courts will be selected—based on demonstrated need and rural location—to receive technology-based access to medication-assisted treatment (MAT) providers. The court system and CCI researchers will develop materials to educate the field about using remote technology to improve treatment, judicial monitoring, and MAT induction.

New York icon graphic

Seneca Nation of Indians

New York

The Seneca Nation of Indians Peacemakers Court will address the increasing number of opioid overdoses and overdose-related deaths in the Seneca National Territories by reducing reliance on emergency health care and the criminal justice system by high-frequency opioid users. In partnership with Seneca Strong, a community-based drug and alcohol prevention and recovery program, the Peacemakers Court will create a community-driven, culturally competent diversion project that will specifically target Native American opioid utilizers who have a high number of contacts with multiple systems. The project coordinator will assemble a multidisciplinary team responsible for developing the program’s policy and procedures. Programming will include culturally specific professionals and confidential trainings and individualized wraparound services, in addition to a data analysis.

New York icon graphic

Seneca Nation of Indians

New York

The Seneca Nation of Indians applied for Category 1c tribal/rural area grant funding in the amount of $595,366.30. The Seneca Nation’s Native Connections Clubhouse Program (SNNCP) will provide opioid, stimulant, and substance abuse education, prevention, and intervention programming that connects law enforcement agencies with K-12 students and provides ongoing community support systems for at-risk youth. Objective one is to provide school administrations, students, and families with access to law enforcement agencies through the School Resource Officer Program; connecting K-12 students to opioid, stimulant, and substance abuse education, prevention, and intervention programming and resources. Objective two is to provide Native American youth and families with access to evidenced-based opioid, stimulant, and substance abuse prevention and intervention strategies/tools/programs beyond traditional school/business hours by opening an after-hour’s safe place, the Clubhouse, for a minimum of 25 hours per week on the Allegany Territory. This project serves the Seneca Nation of Indians Tribe. The project includes partnerships between Lakeshore Central Schools and Silver Central Schools.

New York icon graphic

St. Lawrence County

New York

St. Lawrence County applied for Category 1b suburban area grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The St. Lawrence County Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, and Substance Abuse Site-based Program (COSSAP) utilizes patient-centered care to facilitate access to substance use treatment for individuals with opioid use disorder who are not currently getting the needed care. The program will expand harm-reduction services and recovery support opportunities, as well as increase access to communicable disease testing and preventive care to individuals in high-risk populations. Also, the program will provide essential patient-centered addiction services for the people at greatest risk for overdose. This project serves the 109,558 residents of St. Lawrence County. The project includes partnerships between St. Lawrence County Community Services, St. Lawrence Health Systems, Seaway Valley Prevention Council, the Maximizing Independent Living Center, and New Hope Transformation Ministries (dba Grace House). Priority considerations addressed in this application include Qualified Opportunity Zones and the specific challenges that rural communities face.

Ohio icon graphic

Butler County Mental Health and Addiction Recovery Services Board

Ohio

Butler County will expand the existing pilot Quick Response Team (QRT) to the more rural areas of the county, establish victim services by hiring a care coordinator, expand school-based groups for children of opiate abusers, and establish law enforcement and court-based diversion options for nonviolent opioid abusers. Miami University of Ohio will serve as the local research partner. The applicant agreed to provide data through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

Ohio icon graphic

Butler County of Ohio

Ohio

Butler County of Ohio applied for Category 1B grant funding in the amount of $900,000. The Butler County COSSAP project aims to reduce the impact of opioids, stimulants, and other substances on individuals within its communities, through reducing the number of overdose fatalities, as well as mitigating the impacts of on crime victims by supporting comprehensive, collaborative initiatives. This project serves Butler County, home to a population of 382,000. The project includes a partnership with Miami University’s Center for School-based Mental Health Programs. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural challenges in a high-poverty area and Qualified Opportunity Zone.

Ohio icon graphic

Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction

Ohio

The Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction will partner with the Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services under the Bureau of Correctional Recovery Services to develop virtual reality products aimed at enhancing treatment services for people with opioid abuse and others with opioid involvement. The pilot sites include two prisons: Dayton Correctional Institution and Warren Correctional Institution. In addition to the two prison sites, two community-supervision offices, both in isolated rural areas with limited access to treatment, have been selected as pilot community sites: Pike County Adult Parole Authority and Scioto County Adult Parole Authority. BetaGov/Litmus at New York University (NYU) will serve as the research partner for the proposed project.

Oklahoma icon graphic

Muscogee (Creek) Nation

Oklahoma

The Muscogee (Creek) Nation (MCN), the fourth-largest federally recognized tribe in the United States, is proposing the MCN COAP and Treatment Project. Project MCN will pursue three goals. First, MCN will develop an internal referral process to identify tribal citizens suffering from opioid abuse who need additional services and support or citizens at higher risk as a result of exposure. Second, MCN will create an internal database of patient health information to inform and evaluate patient needs for treatment and prevention opportunities. Third, MCN will increase the number of providers certified and licensed for medication-assisted treatment and new telebehavioral health options at a primary care facility. Use of these expanded options will be driven by data analysis and recommendations from a research partner.

South Carolina icon graphic

Lancaster County

South Carolina

The entire county of Lancaster is 98,012 residents. The proposed project will provide resources for training of every law enforcement officer in the county on LEAD (Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion); promote visible prescription drug takeback strategies; and assist with training, handling, and distribution of naloxone. Priority considerations include the presence of a Qualified Opportunity Zone, poverty, and rural challenges. This application is for Category 1c grant funding.

South Carolina icon graphic

Oconee County

South Carolina

The purpose of this program is to design and implement a collaborative intervention strategy that provides (pre-booking or post-booking) treatment alternative-to-incarceration programs serving individuals at high risk for overdose or substance abuse utilizing evidence-based recovery support services (transitional/recovery housing and peer support) and medication-assisted treatment (MAT). To meet these objectives, the proposed initiative will provide: 1) assessment-based individualized treatment plans, 2) MAT (Medication Assisted Treatment), 3) transitional housing at the OARS Center, 4) cognitive behavioral therapy, and 5) peer support services. Services will be delivered in the Oconee Addiction Recovery & Solutions Center located adjacent to the Oconee Law Enforcement Center that, as a communitywide enterprise, was recently renovated for this purpose. OARS will coordinate with the Oconee County Sheriff’s Office, the Oconee County Detention Center, the Oconee County Drug Court, the 10th Judicial Circuit Solicitor’s Office, and the Center for Family Medicine to deliver the proposed initiative through: 1) the development of a comprehensive, locally driven evidence-based response to opioids, stimulants, and other substances with expanded access to supervision, treatment, and recovery support services; 2) supporting law enforcement and other first responder diversion programs for nonviolent drug offenders to improve responses to offenders at high risk for overdose or substance abuse and provide alternative-to-incarceration services to those suffering from substance abuse disorders; 3) needs assessment tools to identify and prioritize services for jail offenders; 4) the use of evidenced-based treatment practices; and 5) rigorous program evaluation by Clemson University providing feedback and improvement opportunities.

Tennessee icon graphic

Cocke County, Tennessee, Government

Tennessee

Cocke County Government, located in the rural Appalachian Mountain region of eastern Tennessee, applied for grant funding under Subcategory 1b in the amount of $899,488. This project serves Tennessee's 4th Judicial District, which includes Cocke, Sevier, Jefferson, and Grainger counties and has a total combined population of 212,069. The purpose of the proposed Tennessee Recovery Oriented Compliance Strategy (TN-ROCS) Enhancement and Evaluation project is (1) to increase the capacity of this innovative court-based intervention program to link individuals across the district at high risk of overdose to appropriate, evidence-based behavioral health treatment and recovery support services; and (2) to independently validate the TN-ROCS model, such that key findings related to program quality and implementation fidelity can inform current and future data-driven expansion efforts. This project includes partnerships between Cocke County, 4th Judicial District Circuit Court Judge Duane Slone, Dr. Stephen Loyd, Dr. Jennifer Anderson, American Institutes for Research, and Rulo Strategies. All four priority considerations are addressed in this application. Cocke County is a geographically isolated rural area that is plagued by persistently high rates of poverty, substance use, and overdose fatality. Additionally, one census tract within Cocke County (9207.00) has been designated as a Qualified Opportunity Zone.

Tennessee icon graphic

Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services

Tennessee

The Tennessee Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services will support the expansion of behavioral telehealth care services in nine counties in Tennessee, seven of which are designated as rural-based, according to the Economic Research Service Rural-Urban Commuting Areas definition. Each of the participating counties has a poverty rate above the statewide average.

Texas icon graphic

Texas Department of Criminal Justice

Texas

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice Technology-assisted Treatment will expand the continuum of care for participants who need services for opioid abuse but lack the resources (e.g., transportation, recovery support) to obtain the services. The proposed pilot sites shall service clients who have used or abused opioids and are returning to a rural county in or surrounding one of the four cities (Amarillo, Longview, Odessa, and Texarkana) listed among the nation’s top 25 cities identified as having opioid users. These Texas counties may include but are not limited to Angelina, Bowie, Camp, Cass, Cook, Delta, Ector, Fannin, Franklin, Grayson, Gregg, Harrison, Hopkins, Houston, Hunt, Jasper, Kaufman, Lamar, Marion, Midland, Morris, Navarro, Nacogdoches, Newton, Nueces, Panola, Polk, Potter, Red River, Rockwall, Rusk, Sabine, San Augustine, San Jacinto, Shelby, Titus, Trinity, Tyler, and Upshur.

Washington icon graphic

Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation

Washington

The Confederated Tribes of the Chehalis Reservation applied for Category 1c grant funding in the amount of $339,519, and proposes a Chehalis Comprehensive Opioid, Stimulant, Substance Abuse Site-based Program to be run by Tsapowum, the Chehalis Tribal Behavioral members of the Chehalis Reservation, which has a population of 922. The Chehalis COSSAP proposes to increase the Chehalis tribal response to opioids in the tribal community by providing a comprehensive MAT program by distributing Narcan to tribal first responders, including Chehalis Tribal Police Officers, staff at the Chehalis Tribal Wellness Center, and staff of Tsapowum. These specially chosen departments are first responders to overdose, as well as members of the Chehalis Tribal Opioid Task Force. These departments support the Chehalis COSSAP goal of reducing overdoses by half and overdose deaths to zero by 2023. Priority considerations addressed in this application include rural and high poverty areas.

Washington icon graphic

Makah Indian Tribe of the Makah Indian Reservation

Washington

In the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Site-Based Program application, the Makah Tribe is proposing to utilize funding under Category 1: Local or Tribal Applicants, Subcategory 1c. The applicant intends to utilize funds from this application to continue funding the two FTE positions from the previous application: the COSSAP case manager and one coordinator, who will implement the LEAD program, develop MAT protocols, and help further expand the Sisuk Houses. There are no priority considerations for this application.

Washington icon graphic

Makah Indian Tribe of the Makah Indian Reservation

Washington

Multiple departments within the Makah Tribal Organization have developed the concept of a “Healing Together House” (HTH). The HTH project will support a Law Enforcement-Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program as an alternative to the judicial system, addressing those who cycle in and out of the system with no resolution to their underlying needs. The project will develop a drop-in house to provide services such as a 24-hour safe place, recovery coaching, and a space to share meals with and provide education to a community.

Washington icon graphic

Puyallup Tribe of Indians

Washington

The Puyallup Reservation applied under Category 1C for grant funding in the amount of $600,000. The area is highly urbanized as the cities of Tacoma, Fife, Puyallup, Federal Way, and Milton overlap and abut with the Tribe’s Reservation. Pierce County has a population of 876,764. Community Family Services, a department within Puyallup Tribal government administration, connects clients to individualized treatment depending on what stage of recovery a person is in, and services include case management and connection to cultural services. The Puyallup Tribe proposes using grant funding to improve client outcomes by providing inpatient treatment at a culturally appropriate, dual-diagnosis facility, as well as mental health assessments for individuals with mental health concerns and enhanced reentry services for individuals in treatment or incarcerated. The proposed project will positively impact families impacted by opioid, stimulant, and other substance abuse disorders, and improve the quality of life within the Puyallup Tribal community as a whole. The only priority consideration addressed in this application is for a Qualified Opportunity Zone.

Washington icon graphic

Puyallup Tribe of the Puyallup Reservation

Washington

The Puyallup Tribe of Indians, a federally recognized tribe in western Washington State, will implement the Community Reentry Services Project. Members reentering the community from inpatient treatment or a correction facility will receive treatment, case management, peer-to-peer mentorship, and vouchers for housing and transportation.

Wisconsin icon graphic

Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians

Wisconsin

The Bad River Band of Lake Superior Tribe of Chippewa Indians will expand drug and alcohol treatment through the development and implementation of halfway house services and hiring counseling staff to provide services to clients seeking substance abuse counseling.

Wisconsin icon graphic

Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians

Wisconsin

The Lac Courte Oreilles Band of Lake Superior Indians (a federally recognized Indian Tribe) applied under Category 1c for grant funding in the amount of $589,959. This project will serve the Ojibwe Indian membership of the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe (LCO) of rural northern Wisconsin. The population of the Tribe is 7,796, with thousands more familial descendants. The purpose of the project is to provide evidence-based opioid treatment that supports services to tribal individuals in need of transitional or recovery housing with a Bimaadiziwin tribal culture-based peer recovery support services, including medication-assisted treatment and recovery. The project will improve collaboration and partnerships between tribal and community-serving agencies in support of an EBT “wraparound” system of comprehensive Anishinaabe culture-based mental health treatment and recovery that uses the ASAM Criteria to determine the most appropriate level of treatment and care. This project includes important partnerships between the LCO Residential Treatment Center and tribal and county human services agencies, such as: LCO Comprehensive Community Services, LCO Tribal Court, LCO Bizhiki Wellness Center, Social Services Department, Vocational Rehabilitation Program, and the Minimaajisewin Home Program. OJP policy priority areas for Category 1 that are addressed by this project application from the Lac Courte Oreilles Tribe applicant are: applications that address specific challenges that rural communities face, individuals who reside in high-poverty areas (the reservation), and individuals who offer enhancements to public safety in economically distressed communities.

Wisconsin icon graphic

Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin

Wisconsin

The Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin will develop a Police Assisted Addiction and Recovery Initiative (PAARI) model of law enforcement diversion to reduce opioid abuse and the number of overdose fatalities. Grant funds will be used to support a program coordinator, who will assist in implementing the program; a clinical therapist; and three peer support specialists. The applicant agreed to make data available through the Overdose Detection Mapping Application Program (ODMAP).

Wisconsin icon graphic

Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin

Wisconsin

The Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin will mitigate the impact of opioid abuse on crime victims within the Menominee tribal jurisdiction by hiring two full-time crisis response case managers at Tribal Social Services to work with first responders, the Clinic of Behavioral Health, and the Child Protection Team when children are present at the scene of an overdose or are impacted by familial substance abuse. The grant funds will also be used to support a program coordinator who will assist in implementing the program, a clinical therapist, and a family preservation worker.

West Virginia icon graphic

West Virginia Division of Administrative Services, Justice and Community Services

West Virginia

The West Virginia Division of Justice and Community Services (DJCS) will address the opioid crisis in West Virginia by increasing the number of technology-assisted treatment services for individuals involved with the justice system because of an opioid use disorder in rural areas. The program plans to provide mental health services, addiction recovery services, and alternative sanctions or diversions. These services will be implemented through existing community corrections programs and future partnerships to provide risk and need assessments, group counseling, and individual counseling. The project will purchase and install the necessary hardware and software in 12 community corrections programs. The Office of Research and Strategic Planning, a unit within the DJCS, will provide for the research needs of the project.

Diamond shaped graphic accent